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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: syndrome

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  • Downs Syndrome, Turners Syndrome, And Redgreen Color Blindness - 682 words
    1.) Three genetic disorders are Down's syndrome, Turner's syndrome, and Red-green color blindness. They are all caused by undesirable genes inherited by normal genetic mechanisms. These mutations are usually recessive because dominant ones usually die. Turner's Syndrome is caused by faulty cell division known as non disjunction. This occurs when chromosomes fail to separate. IN this disorder, the affected have one "x" chromosome. The effect are an underdeveloped female, mental retardedness, and sterility. Down syndrome is a condition caused by an oddosome that occurs on the pair #21. It results in severe abnormality physical and mental defects. For example, shorter bubble-shape eyes, short f ...
    Related: blindness, down syndrome, downs, cell division, external environment
  • Battered Woman Syndrome Defense - 5,603 words
    ... tle training in dealing with domestic violence cases. The techniques are usually to defuse the situation. Rarely do officers make an arrest. Police departments have what is called "stitch rule" this is a victim needs to have a certain amount of stitches before officers are required to make an arrest. People always ask the same question, well why did she call for help? When the woman finals builds up the courage to actually call the police for help, they arrive to do nothing for her except maybe make situation worst. The worst part of the authorities failing in helping a person is when these people (police officers, prosecutors) believe that they have no business in the next man's busines ...
    Related: battered women, insanity defense, self defense, syndrome, woman
  • Battered Womens Syndrome: A Survey Of Contemporary Theories In 1991, Governor William Weld Modified Parole Regulations And Pe - 1,755 words
    ... s theory, explaining help organizations are too overwhelmed and limited in their resources to be effective and therefore do not try as hard as they should to help victims. Whatever the case may be, the researchers argue that we can better understand the plight of the battered woman by asking did she seek help and what happened when she did, rather than why didn't she leave. Because the survivor theory of learned helplessness attributes the battered woman's plight to ineffective help sources and societal indifference, a logical solution would entail increased funding for programs in place and educating the public about the symptoms and consequences of domestic violence. There are battered ...
    Related: battered women, contemporary, governor, modified, parole, survey, weld
  • Downs Syndrome - 639 words
    DownS Syndrome Description: Juvenile, non-fiction, informational, picture book, accompanied by text. Jon O, as the boy with Downs Syndrome is called, is the main character of this childrens book. His parents, siblings, schoolmates, and friends were the other characters that made up the story. The story briefly sums up what Jon O is like and why he is a special boy. Jon O was categorized as retarded by the family doctor before he was even born, and the book portrayed him as a special child that had many differences from all the normal people around him. Elaine Ominsky made very clear all of the childs differences and made every accomplishment out to be nothing short of a miracle. The Wolfensb ...
    Related: downs, syndrome, social roles, classroom setting, pictures
  • Downs Syndrome, It Is One Of The Most Frequently Occurring Chromosomal Abnormalities Found In Humans Effecting People Of All - 1,868 words
    Down's Syndrome, it is one of the most frequently occurring chromosomal abnormalities found in humans effecting people of all ages, races and economic levels. It is a chromosomal anomaly in cell development that results in a person being born with forty-seven chromosomes instead of the normal forty-six chromosomes. People with Down syndrome may have mild to severe learning disabilities and physical symptoms, which include a small skull, extra folds of skin under the eyes, and a protruding tongue. Roughly one out of every one thousand children born making it the most common genetic disorder. Down syndrome affects over 350,000 people, in the United States alone. Down syndrome has plagued the h ...
    Related: chromosomal, down syndrome, downs, human body, human race, occurring
  • Ehlersdanlos Syndrome - 1,054 words
    Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Ehlers-Danlos sydrome (EDS) is a rare inherited group of connective tissue disorders characterized by defects of the major structural protein in the body (collagen). Collagen is a tough fibrous protein that plays an essential role in binding, holding together, strengthening, and providing elasticity to bodily cells and tissues. There are six major types of EDS that I will discuss, however I will only go into detailed discussion on two of the six types of EDS. The two major types of EDS are Classical EDS and Hypermobile EDS. These two types make up 90% of all EDS cases. I will discuss the general symptoms of these two types along with pathology, then diagnostic factors, ...
    Related: syndrome, motor development, ethnic groups, life expectancy, mild
  • Fetal Alchohol Syndrome - 1,192 words
    Fetal Alchohol Syndrome Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Many pregnant women are not aware of the complications that are involved with pregnancy. The greater majority of young women see pregnancy as a way of bringing a life into the world but do not use precaution in their dietary habits to prevent the destruction or inhibition of such a life. Most pregnant women continue on their drinking and drug abuse binge right throughout their pregnancy. They do not think ahead to the inexplicable damage that it could do to their fetus. What they do not know is that when a woman drinks while pregnant it could do damage, and pose problems not only to herself, but to the fetus that she is carrying. The problem? FA ...
    Related: alchohol, alcohol syndrome, fetal, fetal alcohol, fetal alcohol syndrome, syndrome
  • Fetal Alchohol Syndrome - 1,152 words
    ... stract thinking, and limited problem solving skills. With all these problems they often have difficulty in holding down a job because of their unreliability, lack of social skills, and functional illiteracy. There are many different factors involved in fetal development in relation to FAS. The two things involved that stand out the most are teratogens and acetaldehydes. These two stand out as the things that are not in a detailed way nutritionally involved. No laboratory tests can rule out the diagnosis of FAS but growing research is directed toward finding the underlying mechanisms that contribute to fetal alcohol damage. Scientists also are searching for genetic and biochemical charact ...
    Related: alchohol, fetal, fetal alcohol, syndrome, amino acids
  • Fetal Alcohol Syndrome - 460 words
    Fetal Alcohol Syndrome In one week 10,000 babies are born in Canada. Twenty are born with Fetal Alcohol syndrome (FAS). One hundred with other alcohol related birth defects. FAS is most often described as the leading cause of mental retardation. FAS is not genetic or inherited and is %100 preventable. Fetal Alcohol syndrome refers to a constellation of physical and mental birth defects that may develop in individuals whose mothers consumed alcohol during pregnancy. It is an organic disease that is characterized by central nervous system involvement, growth retardation, and characteristic facial features. Prenatal alcohol exposure also causes malformation of major organs including heart, kidn ...
    Related: alcohol, alcohol syndrome, fetal, fetal alcohol, fetal alcohol syndrome, prenatal alcohol exposure, syndrome
  • Fetal Alcohol Syndrome - 1,797 words
    Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) is a condition affecting children born to women who drink heavily during pregnancy. There are three criteria used to describe the effects of prenatal alcohol exposure and to make a diagnosis of FAS. The first of these is a pattern of facial anomalies, these features include:  Small eye openings  Flat cheekbones  Flattened groove between nose and upper lip  Thin upper lip These characteristics can gradually diminish as the child ages, but it is important to note that diagnosis does not change because of this. The second criteria is growth deficiencies:  Low birth weight  Decelerating weight ove ...
    Related: alcohol, alcohol and drugs, alcohol syndrome, fetal, fetal alcohol, fetal alcohol syndrome, prenatal alcohol exposure
  • Fetal Alcohol Syndrome - 1,768 words
    Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: A Preventable Birth Defect If women didnt drink anymore during pregnancy, there would never be another baby born with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome or Fetal Alcohol Effect (McCuen 33). This is a very powerful statement. It is also a very simple cure for an alarmingly high birth defect that all women have the power to stop. Every year more than 40,000 American children are born with defects because their mother drank alcohol while pregnant (McCuen 34). That is 1 to 3 per 1,000 live births (McCuen 31). Many of these cases go undiagnosed It is also the number one cause of mental retardation in the United States, and one of the three leading causes of bir ...
    Related: alcohol, alcohol dependency, alcohol syndrome, drink alcohol, fetal, fetal alcohol, fetal alcohol syndrome
  • Fetal Alcohol Syndrome - 912 words
    Fetal Alcohol Syndrome How does alcohol affect the unborn baby? What kinds of effects may result in the child and it will it affect it for the rest of his or her life? Whenever you take a drink, the alcohol readily crosses the placenta and enters the babies bloodstream. However the babies tiny developing system is not equipped to handle alcohol and is effected much more severely than is the mother. Every time you take a drink the unborn baby takes a drink as well. Nobody really knows how much alcohol it takes to harm an unborn baby. As the consumption increases so do the risks. Another report suggests that not only can alcohol cause birth defects it can also create leukemia. This new study i ...
    Related: alcohol, alcohol syndrome, fetal, fetal alcohol, fetal alcohol syndrome, syndrome
  • Fetal Alcohol Syndrome - 1,147 words
    Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Fetal Alcohol Syndrome/Fetal Alcohol Effects is a problem running rampant and out of control all across America. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome is the effect of pregnant women-drinking alcohol. Through education, we can eradicate this expensive and debilitating disease that is plaguing our children and our country. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome was first diagnosed about 25 years ago. A group of doctors at the University of Washington in Seattle corned the term Fetal Alcohol Syndrome in 1973 (Dorris 143). Prior to this Fetal Alcohol Syndrome/Fetal Alcohol Effects children were misdiagnosed as problem children or Learning Disabled. Some were mistaken for bad kids ...
    Related: alcohol, alcohol consumption, alcohol syndrome, drink alcohol, fetal, fetal alcohol, fetal alcohol syndrome
  • Fetal Alcohol Syndrome - 1,176 words
    ... a spotty memory, where they may remember, for example, something that happened a year ago, but cannot remember the day before. In addition, they have an inflexibility of thought, where a person with the syndrome can only understand a concept expressed in one way. Once that concept has been learned that one way, it is hard for the individual to understand it in any other context. A difficulty in predicting outcomes is another disability shared by FAS victims. For example, a child with FAS might not be able to foresee what will happen when he knocks over a cup of juice. A child with FAS often tends to make the same mistake repeatedly. Another disturbing trait shared by FAS affected people ...
    Related: alcohol, alcohol syndrome, drugs & alcohol, fetal, fetal alcohol, fetal alcohol syndrome, syndrome
  • Fetal Alcojhol Syndrome - 1,654 words
    Fetal Alcojhol Syndrome Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) refers to a group of physical and mental birth defects resulting from a womens drinking alcohol heavily or at crucial stages during pregnancy. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome was first named and treated in the late 1960's. This condition results from the toxic effect of alcohol and its chemical factors on the developing fetus. FAS is the leading cause of mental retardation occurring in 1 out of every 750 births. The frequency of FAS occurs about 1.9 times out of every 1000 births according to the latest figures, and minor effects can be seen in up to 20% of pregnancies per year. This number changes drastically for women who a ...
    Related: alcohol syndrome, fetal, fetal alcohol, fetal alcohol syndrome, syndrome
  • Fragile X Syndrome - 623 words
    FRAGILE X SYNDROME Fragile X Syndrome is an inherited genetic condition associated with mental retardation. It is caused by a mutation of the "X" chromosome. Fathers cannot pass the disease onto their sons, because females always give an "x" chromosome where a man gives either an "x" or a "y." If a man gives a "y" chromosome, then the result is a boy baby, and since the disease is only carried in the "x" chromosome, a boy can only inherit this disease from his mother. A girl, on the other hand, can inherit the disease from either her father or mother. Interestingly enough, more boys than girls are affected by this disease. Fragile X syndrome appears in children of all ethnic, racial, and eco ...
    Related: down syndrome, fragile, fragile x syndrome, syndrome, northern california
  • Hiv Multiple Bereavement Syndrome - 1,987 words
    Hiv & Multiple Bereavement Syndrome HIV/AIDS and Multiple Bereavement: Is the psychological impact of multiple loss intensified by social factors? "The advent of AIDS has created a new population of people who suffer multiple bereavements as well as threats to their own lives." (Murray-Parkes, 1998, p. xii) The populations most affected by HIV/AIDS live in two geographical locations: the USA and Africa (WHO, 1998) . In 1997 four million people in the Sub-Saharan Africa were newly reported as having seropositive status (WHO, 1998). In North America this figure was 44 thousand (WHO, 1998). Seropositive rates among Gay men in New York City are reported at 36 to 67% (Dean L, 1995). Infection rat ...
    Related: bereavement, multiple, syndrome, financial resources, york city
  • Iliotibial Band Friction Syndrome - 1,377 words
    Iliotibial Band Friction Syndrome Iliotibial Band Friction Syndrome Iliotibial band friction syndrome(ITBFS) also known as runners knee is a very common athletic injury that effects the knee. Runners knee is especially prone to long distance runners or athletes who participate in activities that require highly repetitive running. In greater detail I will be discussing the causes of this injury specifically the biomechanics, anatomy and symptoms involved, also ways of preventing this injury by identifying common training errors and the appropriate training modifications needed, and finally a variety of ways for treatment and rehabilitation to help improve the injury. Causes Anatomy/Biomechani ...
    Related: band, friction, syndrome, research paper, final phase
  • In 1981, A New Fatal, Infectious Disease Was Diagnosedaids Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome It Began In Major Cities, Such - 744 words
    In 1981, a new fatal, infectious disease was diagnosed--AIDS (Acquired Immuno-Deficiency Syndrome). It began in major cities, such as New York, Los Angeles, Miami, and San Francisco. People, mostly homosexual men and intravenous drug users, were dying from very rare lung infections or from a cancer known as Kaposis sarcoma. They have not seen people getting these diseases in numerous years. Soon, it also affected hemophiliacs, blood recipients, prostitutes and their customers, and babies born from AIDS-infected women. AIDS was soon recognized as a worldwide health emergency, and as a fatal disease with no known cure, that quickly became an epidemic. When high-profile victims began to contrac ...
    Related: acquired immunodeficiency, deficiency syndrome, immunodeficiency, immunodeficiency syndrome, infectious, infectious disease, syndrome
  • Irritable Bowel Syndrome - 1,363 words
    Irritable Bowel Syndrome IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME Suffering in Silence Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), is a common disorder of the intestines that affects nearly one out of five people in the United States. According to the book, Irritable Bowel Syndrome & the Mind-Body-Brain-Gut Connection by William B. Salt II, IBS is the most common functional gastrointestinal disorder. The symptoms include constipation, diarrhea or alternating bouts of both, bloating, abdominal pain and many other problems. Symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome usually begin during adolescence or early adulthood. Altered bowel movements occur over periods of days to weeks. Occasionally, symptoms may be continuous. In a gi ...
    Related: bowel, irritable bowel syndrome, syndrome, johns hopkins, eating habits
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