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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: sympathy

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  • Sympathy By Dunbar - 1,128 words
    Sympathy By Dunbar The poem "Sympathy", by Paul Laurence Dunbar suggests to the reader a comparison between the lifestyle of the caged bird, and the African American in the nineteenth century. Paul Laurence Dunbar's focus of "Sympathy" is how the African American identifies and relates to the frustrations and pain that a caged bird experiences. Dunbar begins the poem by stating, "I know what the caged bird feels, alas!" which illustrates the comparison of a caged bird to an African American. Dunbar writes a poem with vivid and descriptive language throughout. Dunbar uses this to emphasize his point that someone tied up in bondage and chains figuratively is not fortunate enough to enjoy the f ...
    Related: dunbar, laurence dunbar, paul laurence dunbar, sympathy, physical abuse
  • Sympathy In Wrights Native Son - 916 words
    Sympathy in Wright's Native Son In Native Son, Richard Wright introduces Bigger Thomas, a liar and a thief. Wright evokes sympathy for this man despite the fact that he commits two murders. Through the reactions of others to his actions and through his own reactions to what he has done, the author creates compassion in the reader towards Bigger to help convey the desperate state of Black Americans in the 1930s. The simplest method Wright uses to produce sympathy is the portrayal of the hatred and intolerance shown toward Thomas as a black criminal. This first occurs when Bigger is immediately suspected as being involved in Mary Daltons disappearance. Mr. Britten suspects that Bigger is guilt ...
    Related: native, native son, richard wright, sympathy, black community
  • Thousand Cranes By Yasunari Kawabata - 1,659 words
    "Thousand Cranes" by Yasunari Kawabata ILLUSTRATE THE ROLE WHICH MRS OTA AND HER DAUGHTER FUMIKO PLAY IN BRINGING ABOUT THE REFORMATION OF KIKUJI'S CHARACTER TO COME TO TERMS WITH HIS PAST. IN WHAT WAYS (IF ANY) DOES THIS HELP HIM BECOME A BETTER PERSON? Kawabata's "Thousand Cranes" is a novel that puts little emphasis on story lines, placing more value on emotions, reflections, symbolism and such. The rather crude (at first sight) plot of this complicated piece of Japanese literature is concentrated on a tangled web of relationships of the past, riddled with jealousy, insecurity and deep mistrust. Kikuji Mitani, the main character, has grown up watching many of these triangular and adultero ...
    Related: first impressions, the girl, main character, insecurity, secure
  • A Fairy Tale - 1,177 words
    A Fairy Tale A fairy tale. Ruby Red, a tale of deceit By Robyn Smith The winter in Argroutsmere had always set on early. It was October, all hallows eve and winter was already here, infact one of the coldest that this small quaint kingdom had ever seen. The trees turned to glass, their branches heavy in a frozen ache, layer upon layer of feather light crystals had gracefully drifted and floated from the heavens, to make this land as pure and white as above. The bear tracks below filling in slowly, the owner long passed. A blanket of fleece covered the earth, a barrier between warmth below and harsh cold above. The lake was of crystal, jewels hidden in the bushes, Sharp daggers of ice, hung f ...
    Related: fairy, fairy tale, tale, invisible hand, over time
  • A Feminist Reading Of Dh Lawrences - 1,932 words
    A Feminist Reading of D.H. Lawrences The Rocking Horse Winner The man that does not know sick women does not know women. - S. Weir Mitchell "The Rocking Horse Winner" is the story of a boys gift for picking the winners in horse races. An omniscient narrator relates the tale of a boy whose family is always short of money. His mother is incapable of showing love and is obsessed with the status that material wealth can provide. This paper will explore the premise that D.H. Lawrence presented the figure of the mother as the villain; a loathsome, unloving character with no commitment to genuine values. This evil mother figure will ultimately be the "male-destroyer" by turning her "nameless" husba ...
    Related: feminist, teddy bear, spend time, rocking-horse winner, breakfast
  • A Journey Though The Golden Gates Of Promise - 2,284 words
    ... because, without them, the United States would become overpopulated and it would slowly deteriorate. If Congress did not create the quota laws as a way to control who is allowed to enter the country, it would leave the magnificent "Golden Gates" open to anyone who wanted to enter the promise land. It is insane to even consider letting everyone of every ethnicity into the United States because the results would be devastating for the American society. American citizens often criticize that the quota laws discriminate towards different ethnic groups, but, in reality, it is common sense to prefer letting immigrants into the country that are more likely to "fit in" with the cultures being p ...
    Related: golden, promise, another country, labor laws, reject
  • A Major Role In The Continuation Of Modern Society Is Our Leaders And The Roles They Play They Are The Ones Who Will Show Us - 1,418 words
    A major role in the continuation of modern society is our leaders and the roles they play. They are the ones who will show us the way, so to speak. But who will these people, these leaders, be? What qualities and characteristics do leaders possess? And why is it we the people follow these leaders? But first, what is leadership? Leadership is a process whereby one group member influences and coordinates the behavior of other members in pursuit of the groups goals. This specific group member, the leader, provides guidance, specialized skills, and environmental contacts that help obtain the goals of the group. Some activities, or responsibilities, of the leader are planning, organizing, and con ...
    Related: good leader, leadership role, modern society, prentice hall, new jersey
  • A Portrait Of The Artist As A Young Man - 822 words
    A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man A Portrait of Stephen Dedalus as a Young Man A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man is above all a portrait of Stephen Dedalus. It is through Stephen that we see his world, and it is his development from sensitive child to rebellious young man that forms the plot of the novel. There are many Stephens, often contradictory. He is fearful yet bold, insecure yet proud, lonely and at the same time afraid of love. One Stephen is a romantic who daydreams of swashbuckling heroes and virginal heroines. The other is a realist at home on Dublin's most sordid streets. One Stephen is too shy to kiss the young lady he yearns for. The other readily turns to prostitu ...
    Related: artist, portrait, portrait of the artist as a young man, greek myth, different aspects
  • A Rose For Emily A Closer Look - 1,288 words
    A Rose For Emily A Closer Look 12/2/97 period 1 William Faulkners A Rose for Emily tells the story of a young woman who is violated by her fathers strict mentality. After being the only man in her life Emilys father dies and she finds it hard to let go. Emily was raised in the ante-bellum period before the Civil War. This story takes place in the Reconstruction Era after the war when the North takes control of the South. Like her father Miss Emily possesses a stubborn outlook towards life, she refuses to change. This short story explains Emily, her mystified ways and the townsfolks sympathetic curiosity. The plot of the story is mainly about Miss Emilys attitude about change. On the first of ...
    Related: a rose for emily, emily, emily grierson, rose for emily, black woman
  • A Rose, The Universal Symbol Of Love - 637 words
    A Rose, the Universal Symbol of Love In William Faulkner's A Rose for Emily, Miss Emily Grierson is a lonely old woman, living a life void of all love and affection; although the rose only directly appears in the title, the rose surfaces throughout the story as a symbol. In contemporary times, the rose also symbolizes emotions like love and friendship. The rose symbolizes dreams of romances and lovers. These dreams belong to women, who like Emily Grierson, have yet to experience true love for themselves. Throughout the life of Emily Grierson, she remains locked up, never experiencing love from anyone but her father. She lives a life of loneliness, left only to dream of the love missing from ...
    Related: true love, rose for emily, william faulkner, contemporary times, teaches
  • A Rough Man - 1,341 words
    A Rough Man Rough, vigorous, hot-tempered and rich is what Mark Twain grew up to be. Born 1835 in Missouri, Florida he always did what he needed to in order for him to reach his goal. Even though he dropped out of school at the age of twelve, when his father died, he accomplished numerous things. Mark began writing when he took the job of a journalist. The tale 'The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County' was his first success. After a trip by boat to Palestine, he wrote The Innocents Abroad. As his writing career blossomed, he also became successful as a lecturer. In 1870 got married, and a few years later he and his wife settled in Hartford, Connecticut. Huckleberry Finn is Twain's ma ...
    Related: rough, mysterious stranger, gilded age, point of view, imagination
  • A Tale Of Two Cities Two Cities - 1,154 words
    A Tale of two cities - Two Cities Two Cities Jarvis Lorry, an employee of Tellson's Bank, was sent to find Dr. Manette, an unjustly imprisoned physician, in Paris and bring him back to England. Lucie, Manette's daughter who thought that he was dead, accompanied Mr. Lorry. Upon arriving at Defarge's wine shop in Paris, they found Mr. Manette in a dreadful state and took him back to London with them. Mr. Manette could not rember why he had been imprisoned, or when he was imprisoned. He was in a state of Post Tramatic Stress Dis-order. All the years of imporisonment led to his insanity, his life was in danger almost every second of his imprisoned life. In 1780, five years later, Lucie, Mr. Lorr ...
    Related: tale, tale of two cities, central idea, prison experience, imprisonment
  • A Thematic Analysis Of Alfred Hitchcocks Psycho - 1,465 words
    A Thematic Analysis of Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho Arts- Movies A Thematic Analysis of Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho has been commended for forming the archetypical basis of all horror films that followed its 1960 release. The mass appeal that Psycho has maintained for over three decades can undoubtedly be attributed to its universality. In Psycho, Hitchcock allows the audience to become a subjective character within the plot to enhance the film's psychological effects for an audience that is forced to recognise its own neurosis and psychological inadequacies as it is comp  elled to identify, for varying lengths of time, with the contrasting personalities of the film's m ...
    Related: alfred, alfred hitchcock, psycho, thematic, thematic analysis
  • A Traveler Is Resolute And Independent - 1,973 words
    A Traveler is Resolute and Independent Tenets of Wordsworth in Resolution and Independence Romanticism officially began in 1798, when William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge anonymously published Lyrical Ballads. This work marked the official beginning of a literary period which had already begun many years before 1798. A work is defined to be of a certain period by its characteristics, therefore to be considered a Romantic work, the work must contain aspects which are termed "Romantic." A few typical "Romantic" aspects are: love of the past; sympathy to the childs mind; faith in the inner goodness of man; aspects of nature having religious, mystic, and symbolic significance; and reco ...
    Related: traveler, william wordsworth, role model, lyrical ballads, sleepless
  • Abnormal Psychology - 1,197 words
    Abnormal Psychology In a world full of fears, perhaps the worst one a human being should haveis that to be afraid of his fellow man. The human that should be mostfeared is the one that has Anti-Social Personality Disorder or in laymensterms the psychopath. The psychopath is probably the most deviant mindthat exists and treatment is not very successful because there is not a cureor drug to control it. The solution in my mind to control the problem ofsociopaths is to let them live in colonies with each other. Through myresearch I will develop an understanding of this personality disorder andconvince you the reader that my solution might be a viable solution. Thesociopath is a combination of ot ...
    Related: abnormal, abnormal psychology, psychology, hyperactivity disorder, violent behavior
  • Abortion - 1,084 words
    Abortion Leslie Booher College Writing I 10/29/99 Abortion Abortion is the deliberate termination of a pregnancy. Most people know what abortion is thats the simple part, what gets more complicated is the moral issue surrounding it. There are some people who believe that abortion is a personal issue that should be decided by the mother and that if she decides to abort the baby that is ok. The other side of the issue is for the people like myself who feel that abortion is wrong in any situation. Is abortion killing? Yes abortion is killing a pre born child just because it is called removal doesnt mean that it is not killing. Yes the ultimate intention is removal, but it is carried out by a me ...
    Related: abortion, people believe, moral issue, college writing, womb
  • Abraham Lincoln - 1,117 words
    Abraham Lincoln Abraham Lincoln, the 16th president of the United States, guided his country through the most devastating experience in its national history--the Civil War. He is considered by many historians to have been the greatest American president. Early Life Lincoln was born on Feb. 12, 1809, in a log cabin in Hardin (now Larue) County, Ky. Indians had killed his grandfather, Lincoln wrote, "when he was laboring to open a farm in the forest" in 1786; this tragedy left his father, Thomas Lincoln, "a wandering laboring boy" who "grew up, litterally [sic] without education." Thomas, nevertheless, became a skilled carpenter and purchased three farms in Kentucky before the Lincolns left th ...
    Related: abraham, abraham lincoln, lincoln, mary todd lincoln, nancy hanks lincoln, thomas lincoln, todd lincoln
  • Absurd - 1,338 words
    ... hinoceros, as being the Nazi influence, and Berenger, the main character, as an ordinary man in an extraordinary situation. The chaos of the early to mid-twentieth century influenced Ionesco's life and work's greatly. He struggled with the concept of the absurd and soon became the father of the theatre of the absurd. He led men such as Samuel Beckett and Jean Genet to a greater understanding of the absurd. Samuel Beckett was one of the greatest names of the theater of the absurd. He spent a lifetime of hardship and work to overcome the challenges of his low self-esteem and confidence. He grew up in Dublin, Ireland, in a prominent family. After college, he was employed as James Joyce's se ...
    Related: absurd, modern world, liberation organization, middle class, autobiographical
  • According To Aristotle, A Tragedy Is A Form Of Theater That Replicates A Solemn Action With The Intention Of Stirring Dread A - 1,073 words
    According to Aristotle, a tragedy is a form of theater that replicates a solemn action with the intention of stirring dread and sympathy in the viewer. Sophocles Antigone and Arthur Millers All My Sons both fit into this category. Both stories consist of a tragic hero, Creon and Joe Keller in this instance. According to Aristotles Poetics, a tragic hero is someone not all good or all bad, and whose downfall is caused by a tragic flaw or "hamartia". Later the hero comes to a realization of their flaw, which usually comes too late for them to redeem themselves. Creon and Keller are both tragic heroes that fit into Aristotles model, whose downfall is caused by greed, excessive pride and a belat ...
    Related: dread, intention, solemn, theater, tragedy
  • Adventures Of Huck Finn - 1,195 words
    ... is casual dialogue ironically, as a was to underscore the chilling truth about the old south, that it was a society where perfectly "nice" people didn't consider the death of a black person worth their notice. Because of his upbringing, the boy starts out that slavery is part of the natural order; but as the story unfolds he wrestles with his conscience, and when the crucial moment comes he decides he will be damned to the flames of hell rather than betray his black friend. And Jim, as Twain presents him, is hardly a caricature. Rather, he is the moral center of the book, a man of courage and nobility, who risks his freedom risks his life -- for the sake of his friend Huck. (Swalden 2) ...
    Related: adventures of huckleberry finn, finn, huck, huck finn, huckleberry finn
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