Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: bertha

  • 24 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • Abraham Maslow - 1,910 words
    Abraham Maslow ABRAHAM MASLOW Born April1,1908 Abraham Maslow was the oldest of seven children born to his parents in Brooklyn New York. Feeling pressure from his parents to achieve academic greatness, Abraham went through early childhood with few friends. Focusing mainly on his studies Maslow had a quiet and unfulfilling adolescence. Abraham started off his college career by attending city college in New York were he began to study law, as his father had wanted him to do. He soon lost interest and transferred to the University of Wisconsin and studied psychology. Here Maslow received, in 1934, his Ph.D. During his college career Abraham married his cousin Bertha Goodman, his parents did not ...
    Related: abraham, abraham maslow, maslow, social order, third force
  • Alfred Nobel His Prizes - 1,163 words
    ... need for cutting labor costs. At this point Alfred and his father were tragically reminded of the peril of nitroglycerine due to the Heleneborg disaster in which Emil was killed as well as some others.4 After this point both Alfred and Immanuel were emotionally traumatized. Soon after Emils death Alfred focused on the manufacturing methods of nitroglycerine and eventually created conditions in which it was rendered harmless. In speaking of Alfred Nobels response to the death of his brother Evlanoff states: He blamed himself with bitterness He mourned that he had not been able to accomplish this sooner, so Emil need not have died. He could never forget the dreadful day of the Heleneborg ...
    Related: alfred, alfred nobel, nobel, nobel peace, nobel peace prize, nobel prize
  • Brazilian Economy - 1,016 words
    ... mption, although this will lag behind the other drivers of growth. Industrial production grew in February for the fifth time in seven months, the first time Brazil has posted such a broad expansion since late 1997 (LaitnFocus) Public debt growth accelerated after mid-1995 due to the need to stabilize short-term capital inflows drawn by high domestic interest rates. This policy together with the need to extend central bank credit to the financial sector to help troubled banks has also led to a growing quasi-fiscal deficit. The Real's value has held well below its weakest point early in 1999 (around R2: $1), ending 1999 at R1.79: $1. Although debt repayments are forecast to be higher in th ...
    Related: brazilian, brazilian economy, economy, open economy, world economy
  • Cancer - 1,487 words
    Cancer Introduction According to Mollet, cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States. Estimates for 1982 indicate that 430,000 Americans will have died of some form of cancer. If national trends continue, some fifty-three million Americans now alive will contract cancer sometime during their lifetime. Of this inverse number, approximately one-half will die of cancer despite a medical effort to cure and prevent cancer (300). Although 45 percent of the detected cases of serious cancer are curable, an increase of 5 percent in the last ten years, it is obvious that measures can be taken to increase the cure rate and also prevent onset of various cancers. Clark suggested that ...
    Related: american cancer, breast cancer, cancer, colon cancer, human cancer, lung cancer, prevent cancer
  • Charlemagne - 1,109 words
    Charlemagne Charlemagne Charlemagne, also known as Charles the Great, became the undisputed ruler of Western Europe. As Western Europe was deteriorating Charlemagne was crowned the privilege of being joint king of the Franks in 768 A.D. People of Western Europe, excluding the church followers, had all but forgotten the great gifts of education and arts that they had possessed at one time. Charlemagne solidly defeated barbarians and kings in identical fashion during his reign. Using the re-establishment of education and order, Charlemagne was able to save many political rights and restore culture in Western Europe. Charlemagne was born in 742 A.D., to a very famous and well-known family. Char ...
    Related: charlemagne, western europe, civil wars, roman catholic, spanish
  • Culture Awareness - 1,454 words
    Culture Awareness I was planning to take a leisurely trip this summer, but now I think I'll have to change my plans. Instead I'll probably have to take a crash course in Sensitivity for the Culturally Unaware. Maybe it's because I grew up in Chicago, perhaps the most culturally diverse city in the country. Maybe it's because I have a mulatto niece and nephew. Maybe it's because my cousin's last name is now Hernandez. Maybe it's because my wife's cousin is a Native American. Or maybe it's because we Poles have borne the brunt of more jokes than any other ethnic group, but all this time I thought I was aware of other cultures and the feelings of members of other ethnic groups and minorities. N ...
    Related: awareness, interstate highway, american experience, speed limits, pride
  • England Latin Anglia, Political Division Of The Island Of Great Britain, Constituting, With Wales, The Principal Division Of - 4,616 words
    England (Latin Anglia), political division of the island of Great Britain, constituting, with Wales, the principal division of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. England occupies all of the island east of Wales and south of Scotland, another division of the United Kingdom. Established as an independent monarchy many centuries ago, England in time achieved political control over the rest of the island, all the British Isles, and vast sections of the world, becoming the nucleus of one of the greatest empires in history. The capital, largest city, and chief port of England is London, with a population (1991 preliminary) of 6,378,600. It is also the capital of Great Britai ...
    Related: church of england, division, great britain, latin, principal, southern england
  • Gargoyle - 1,238 words
    Gargoyle Just What is a Gargoyle? A Gargoyle is a grotesquely carved human or animal figure found on an architectural structure, originally designed (believe it or not) to serve as a spout to throw rainwater clear of a building. They later became strictly ornamental and assumed many forms. The Natural and Unnatural History of Gargoyles The gargoyle often makes his perch On a cathedral or a church Where, mid eclesiastic style He smiles an early Gothic smile Oliver Herford Welcome. Your are about to meet a peculiar race of creatures which inhabited the great cathedrals of the Middle Ages, proliferating between the 11th and 13th centuries. Some of their decendants have ventured away from church ...
    Related: national geographic, greeks and romans, male female, strictly, nose
  • History Of Nursery Ryhmes - 1,554 words
    History Of Nursery Ryhmes When you think of nursery rhymes, do you think of innocent, silly games you played as a child? Think again. Most of the nursery rhymes that have become so popular with the children were never intended for them. Most began as folk songs or ballads sung in taverns. These songs (rhymes) all most always were written to make fun of religious leaders or to gossip about kings and queens (Brittanica pars. 1-5). Nursery rhymes are being studied the past few decades as a way to help children learn their alphabet and numbers. These rhymes have been proven affective in helping children's language skills improve. As I began to explore different nursery rhymes, I found that they ...
    Related: history, history channel, nursery, nursery rhymes, oral history, social history
  • Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte - 1,592 words
    Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte Jane Eyre would have only found bad, she now also finds good. Also, du The novel, Jane Eyre, by Charlotte Bronte is a thought provoking book that deals with the heroine, Jane, trying to break free of the social orders of the nineteenth century, in order to free herself from the restraints of the "class" system of the time and to free her heart from her inner self. In order to express this theme, Bronte creates five places that represent the emotion of her heart: Gateshead, Lowood, Thornfield, Moor End and Ferndean. By creating these five settings, Bronte leads us on a Journey, with Jane narrating, away from the concrete situation into a world of symbolism. On th ...
    Related: bronte, charlotte, charlotte bronte, eyre, jane, jane eyre, thornfield jane
  • Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte - 848 words
    Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte In Charlotte Bronte Jane Eyre, the main character faces many struggles. One of the struggles she faces is the temptation to run away with the man she loves and be his mistress or to marry a man who offers her the contrary where it would be a legal and highly respectable marriage but with no genuine love. Jane Eyre returns to Rochester because she values love and passion more than reason and when she hears his mysterious voice calling for her, she is also sure that Rochester and her share a spiritual link. Jane must decide between two men who have similar characteristics but are offering her almost exact opposite relationships. Jane must decide between reason and ...
    Related: bronte, charlotte, charlotte bronte, eyre, jane, jane eyre
  • Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte - 1,390 words
    Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte Title: Jane Eyre Author: Charlotte Bronte Genre: fictional novel Setting: 19th century England, Yorkshire Moors Point of View: first person Narrator: Jane Eyre telling it as an adult flashing back to her childhood CHARACTERS: Jane Eyre: Jane is the orphaned daughter of a poor parson and his disinherited wife. She lives at Gateshead Hall in the care of her aunt, Sarah Gibson Reed. She is lonely and depressed here because she is abused emotionally and physically. She later enrolls at Lowood, a boarding school for poor, orphaned girls. There, Jane distinguishes herself in her classes and finds love and compassion through the kindness of Ms. Temple and Helen. She ev ...
    Related: bronte, charlotte, charlotte bronte, eyre, jane, jane eyre
  • Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte 1816 1855 - 1,493 words
    Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte (1816 - 1855) Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte (1816 - 1855) Type of Work: Psychological romance Setting Northern England; 1800s Principal Characters Jane Eyre, an orphan girl Mrs. Reed, Jane's aunt, and mistress of Gateshead Hall Edward Rochester, the once-handsome owner of Thornfield Manor St. John Rivers, a young clergyman Story Overveiw Orphaned at birth, Jane Eyre was left to live at Gateshead Hall Manor with her aunt-in-law, Mrs. Reed. Jane remained at the estate for ten years, subjected to hard work, mistreatment, and fixed hatred. After a difficult childhood, the shy, petite Jane was sent to Lowood School, a semi-charitable institution for girls. She excell ...
    Related: bronte, charlotte, charlotte bronte, eyre, jane, jane eyre, thornfield jane
  • Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte Theme - 1,703 words
    Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte Theme Longing for Love Charlotte Bronte created the novel "Jane Eyre," with an overriding theme of love. The emotional agony that the main character experiences throughout the novel stem from the treatment received as a child, loss of loved ones, and economic hardships. To fill these voids, Jane longs for love. Ironically, Jane rejects affection at some point throughout the novel though it is that which she seeks. Her painful childhood experiences create an emotional center derived from this pain. Thus, she views love as consuming and it is not a high priority in Jane's life. She accepts the fact that she will probably live her life in loneliness. From the onset ...
    Related: bronte, charlotte, charlotte bronte, eyre, jane, jane eyre, thornfield jane
  • Jane Eyre Violence - 945 words
    Jane Eyre - Violence Jane Eyre - Violence Discuss Charlotte Brontë's use of violence, in the text Jane Eyre, that captures the reader's attention in relation to scenes, settings and characterisations? The author of Jane Eyre, Charlotte Brontë, uses depictions of mental, physical and natural violence throughout the text to interest the reader and create springboards towards more emotional and dramatic parts of the novel. By doing this, Brontë not only uses violence to capture the reader's attention, but also leads the reader on an interesting journey throughout the book. This violence is raised through three particular things that include the following. Scenes, such as the burn ...
    Related: eyre, jane, jane eyre, violence, first instance
  • Martin Scorsese - 1,454 words
    Martin Scorsese Martin Scorsese. Movie critic, Roger Ebert, has called him a "directing god". He has been called the "most influential and best director of their time" by fellow director, George Lucas. Director Martin Scorsese has been an influential director for the past twenty years. In the 60's class of directors that included, Francis Ford Coppola, George Lucas, Brian De Palma, and Steven Spielberg. Scorsese ranks with this class of artists, and his movies have changed the film industry of America (Friedman I). The impact of Scorsese can be shown in a number of ways, such as his style of directing, the films that he has made, and also the relationships that he has made in the film indust ...
    Related: martin, martin scorsese, scorsese, best director, mean streets
  • Maya Angelou - 1,297 words
    Maya Angelou A poet, an author, a play-write, an actress, a mother, a civil-rights activists, historian and most important a survivor. Perhaps Maya Angelou, award winning author of many books is one of the most influential African Americans in American history. I believe that she rates at the top of the list of American authors, with Hemingway, Hawthorne, and Voight. I believe through my research and reading of Maya Angelou that she should be among the members of The American Authors Hall of Fame. Maya was born on, April 4th, 1928 as Marguerite Johnson, in St. Louis Missouri. She was raised in Stamps Arkansas, by her Grandmother Annie Henderson and Her Uncle Willie. Stamps was a rural segreg ...
    Related: angelou, maya, black girl, north carolina, boyfriend
  • Muddy Waters - 832 words
    Muddy Waters Muddy Waters Blues as an art form gave Blacks a medium to manifest their feelings. Feelings ranging from humorous to silly to depressed. Fortunately for a entire genre of music, the only way for Mckinley Morganfield to express himself was through song. Morganfield better known as Muddy Waters became a legendary blues vocalist /guitarist. When the Blues industry saw commercial success many of its artists also saw rising fame. Muddy Waters enjoyed success in the industry up until and even after his death in 1983. Morganfield was born April 4, 1915 to Ollie Morganfield and Bertha Jones. He was born in Rollingfork, Mississippi. Near their two room shack in Rollingfork there was a cr ...
    Related: muddy waters, richard wright, rock & roll, robert johnson, saturday
  • Mysticism - 4,845 words
    ... e is the passage: And however much our Lady lamented and whatever other things she said, she was always in her inmost heart in immovable detachment. Let us take an analogy of this. A door opens and shuts on a hinge. Now if I compare the outer boards of the door with the outward man, I can compare the hinge with the inward man. When the door opens or closes the outer boards move to and fro, but the hinge remains immovable in one place and it is not changed at all as a result. So it is also here . . . (Clark and Skinner, 1958, p. 167; emphasis mine). A hinge pin moves on the outside and remains unmoving at its centre. To act and yet remain in her inmost heart in immovable detachment depict ...
    Related: mysticism, religious experience, human beings, oxford university press, empty
  • The Canterbury Cathedral - 1,630 words
    The Canterbury Cathedral For at least fourteen hundred years the worship of God has been offered on the site of this Cathedral, and through the prayers of the Church his power and grace have shaped human lives. Ever since the murder of Archbishop Thomas Becket in the Cathedral in 1170, Canterbury has attracted thousands of pilgrims. This tradition continues to this day, and a large team of Welcomers, Guides, Cathedral Assistants and Chaplains are there to give all visitors a warm welcome. The Cathedral and Metropolitical Church of Christ Canterbury is a holy place of pilgrimage, founded by St Augustine for the worship of Almighty God and the honour of Christ our Saviour. It is the seat of th ...
    Related: archbishop of canterbury, canterbury, canterbury cathedral, cathedral, the archbishop of canterbury
  • 24 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2