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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: surrealism

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  • Dada Vs Surrealism - 1,228 words
    Dada Vs. Surrealism What elements of dada and surrealism suggest the influence of Freud? The 20th Century marked a changed in how people viewed the known world. Since its beginning art has played a major role in how people were able to express themselves. The early 20th century brought rise to new and exciting art forms. These were types of writings, paintings and, documentaries that no one had ever seen before. From expressionism to Dadaism types of work ranged by all means of the artist. About the 1920's a new wave of art would soon be seen worlds over. This art form introduced psychology in a new way to look at the conscious and subconscious minds. From the beginning Dadaism and surrealis ...
    Related: dada, surrealism, andre breton, western culture, psyche
  • Dali And Surrealism - 816 words
    Dali And Surrealism The Outline I. The early life of Dali : A- The Place and Time of his birth. B-The incident of his dead brother. C-The effect of his brother on him. D- His study and the beginning of his drwings. II. The Surrealistic era and Dali : A-The two important gifts. B-The price of the gifts. C-Loosing his paintings before the Nazi invasion. D-The elements that appear in most of his paintings. C. The Slave Market and the bust of Voltaire (1940) : A-The Picture description. B-The double Imagery in the picture. C-Gala in the picture. D-Sexuality in the picture. E-The land of Catalonia. Dr. Amin Tarek Balbaa ECLT 113(21) 15-5-2000 5th Paper: Essay on a Surrealistic painting Dali and S ...
    Related: dali, salvador dali, surrealism, french philosopher, slave market
  • Surrealism - 902 words
    Surrealism As World War I came to an end, the Dada movement evolved into a new movement called Surrealism. This medium of art created a palette of purity and hope though automatism and use of dreams. The Surrealists strove for simplicity and spontaneity or as some called it, automatism. They wanted to answer the question how shall I be free? and to express thought without any tainted preconceptions. They believed automatism would reveal the true and individual nature of anyone who practiced it, far more completely than could any of his conscious creations. For automatism was the most perfect means for reaching and tapping the unconscious. (Stangos 125) This free style of expression, first us ...
    Related: surrealism, world war i, unconscious mind, point of view, technique
  • Surrealism - 1,034 words
    Surrealism pure psychic automatism intended to express the true process of thought free from the exercise of reason and from any aesthetic or moral purpose mister sands / hmw oao jem coones art to the observer is an obsession art to the artist is an addiction few groups in the 20th century have been as influential as the surrealists. surrealism came at a time of dramatic upheaval, both historically and culturally, and grew to encompass all forms of art, wether it be drama, literature, painting, photography or cinema. indeed, their influence was so great that echoes of the breakthroughs made by such seers as breton, artaud, man ray, and dali can still be heard today. surrealism rose from the ...
    Related: surrealism, balance sheet, modern art, human existence, trigger
  • Alexander Sandy Calder - 490 words
    Alexander Sandy Calder Alexander Sandy Calder was born into a family of renowned artists who encouraged him to create from a very young age. As a boy, he had his own workshop where he made toys for himself and his sister. He received a degree in mechanical engineering in 1919 but soon after decided to pursue a career as an artist. Calder attended classes at the Art Students League in New York from 1923 to 1926, supporting himself by working as an illustrator. In 1926 Calder arrived in Paris where he developed his Cirque Calder,a work of performance art employing small-scale circus figures he sculpted from wire, wood, cloth, and other materials. Through these elaborate performances, Calder me ...
    Related: alexander, calder, sandy, mechanical engineering, avant garde
  • American Impressionism - 954 words
    American Impressionism In the years following the Civil War, American art underwent a fundamental shift. The traditional Romantic style of painting, which focused on portraying majestic scenes in stark, vivid lines and shapes, gave way to a new concern for light and atmosphere. It was the age of Impressionism. Impressionism was not indigenous to America. In fact, its origins lay in France, which had long been at the fore of artistic innovation. The French Impressionists threw off the shackles of traditional painting in favor of an airier, lighter style. The purpose of Impressionism was to convey the impression of an object by capturing the patterns of light and color on and surrounding it. T ...
    Related: american, american art, american artists, early american, great american, impressionism
  • Anais Nin - 1,631 words
    Anais Nin Anais Nin was a passionate woman, not only in her works but also in her life. The fact that she lived life to the fullest is what made her books so intriguing. Although her diaries were a chronicle of her experience, her fiction showed the reader sides of her while displaying everyone's innermost desires. In her own words Nin says, "the role of the writer is not to say what we can all say, but what we are unable to say" (Rollins), and she does exactly that. For this reason her works take one on a journey through one's soul and allows the pondering which may never have been considered. This feeling of self discovery is quite powerful and erotic; the enpowerment supplies a feeling of ...
    Related: ethan frome, good company, literary device, surrealism, walsh
  • Betty Boop - 767 words
    Betty Boop Betty Boop The best case study in animation to illustrate the powerful influence society has over the types of films that are produced is the story of Betty Boop. She was a major cartoon character before the Production Code of 1934 was put into place, and her dramatic and fatal transformation illustrates how a product created under one set of standards often withers when placed in a new set. At the same time, the Code alone cannot explain why this dizzy little flapper degenerated so quickly. Betty Boop exists today solely as a merchandising item. Betty's face and figure can be found on T-shirts, posters, and all sorts of things. Her current popularity in merchandise is somewhat pu ...
    Related: betty, school education, case study, exotic dancer, calloway
  • Catch 22 - 1,169 words
    Catch 22 Heller's principle emphasis is on the internal struggle with conflicting values and the characters' evolution. He creates a quandary that Yossarian explores throughout the novel, and establishes Yossarian's world as one turned upside down by war. After exploring this chaotic condition and the mess it creates on people's values, Yossarian finally arrives at his decision to withdraw from the conflict. In the first half of the war, Yossarian runs. As he comes to terms with himself, he takes responsibility and explores life beyond himself. Identifying his adversary after careful reasoning, Yossarian names the enemy as 'anybody who's going to get you killed, no matter which side he's on. ...
    Related: catch, catch 22, first half, young woman, irony
  • Crime And Punishment And Invisible Man - 1,117 words
    Crime And Punishment And Invisible Man Why Do I Exist? Existentialism in Crime and Punishment and Invisible Man The works of Dostoevsky and Ellison are both obvious existential novels, but they exist on two different levels of existentialism. In Invisible Man the invisible narrator has to deal with the enemy of a chaotic and prejudice world around him. In contrast Roskolnokov in Crime And Punishment is his own enemy, and struggles with his two separate identities. One which feels he is superior to ordinary men and the other which is kind, caring and sensitive to those around him. The movie, "Erin Brockovich" also deals with existentialism, and still on another level. She has to overcome a do ...
    Related: crime, crime and punishment, invisible, invisible man, punishment
  • Cubism - 1,057 words
    Cubism Before the twentieth century, art was recognized as an imitation of nature. Paintings and portraits were made to look as realistic and three-dimensional as possible, as if seen through a window. Artists were painting in a flamboyant style. French postimpressionist Paul Czannes flattened still lives, and African sculptures gained in popularity in Western Europe when artists went looking for a new way of showing their ideas and expressing their views. In 1907 Pablo Picasso created the painting Les Damsoilles dAvignon, depicting five women whose bodies are constructed of geometric shapes and heads of African masks rather then faces. This new image grew to be known as cubism. The name ori ...
    Related: cubism, art deco, georges braque, spanish civil war, injured
  • Dulce Et Decorum Est - 609 words
    Dulce Et Decorum Est Explication of Dulce et Decorum Est In his poem exhibiting the gruesome imagery of World War I, Dulce et Decorum Est, Wilfred Owen conveys his strongly anti-war sentiments to the reader. Through the irony found in the ending, horrific imagery, and the feeling of surrealism woven into the poem, Owen forces the reader to experience the war, and therefore feel almost as decisively about it as he does. Owen applies the rhetorical situation, sensory imagery, and figurative language to contribute to the power and anti-war sentiment of the poem. The rhetorical situation in the poem helps to make the reader accept the poems message by showing that the speaker may be trusted to b ...
    Related: decorum, dulce, dulce et decorum est, figurative language, world war i
  • Dylan Thomas And Death Shall Have No Dominion - 1,055 words
    Dylan Thomas - And Death Shall Have No Dominion The Author and His Times When, in 1939, W. H. Auden and Christopher Isherwood set sail for the United States, the so-called 'All the fun' age ended. Auden's generation of poets' expectations came to nothing after the end of the Spanish Civil War, and they, disillusioned, left the European continent for good. In the late 1930s the school of Surrealism reached England, and Dylan Thomas was one of the few British authors of the time who were followers of this new trend in the arts. He shared the Surrealist interest in the great abstracts of Love and Death, and composed most of his work according to the rules of Surrealism. His first two volumes, E ...
    Related: dominion, dylan, dylan thomas, english literature, central theme
  • Dylan Thomas Companion - 1,036 words
    Dylan Thomas Companion Auden and Christopher Isherwood set sail for the United States, the so-called 'All the fun' age ended. Auden's generation of poets' expectations came to nothing after the end of the Spanish Civil War, and they, disillusioned, left the European continent for good. In the late 1930s the school of Surrealism reached England, and Dylan Thomas was one of the few British authors of the time who were followers of this new trend in the arts. He shared the Surrealist interest in the great abstracts of Love and Death, and composed most of his work according to the rules of Surrealism. His first two volumes, Eighteen Poems and Twenty-five Poems were published in the middle of the ...
    Related: companion, dylan, dylan thomas, w. h. auden, spanish civil war
  • Elizabeth - 540 words
    Elizabeth Bishop Why Elizabeth Bishop was Considered to be Dickonsonian in Her Writing Style Poet Elizabeth Bishop was as simple as she was complex. The lucid and uncomplicated images she created with her seemingly elementary style were anything but; in fact, the complexity that resides within her characteristically simple prose, which demonstrate a purity and precision like no other, are known only to those who can see beyond their faзade. Attention to outer detail and an unquenchable desire to portray her inner pain, Bishop favored a more simplistic approach to convey the immense pain and suffering she endured throughout her life. Utilizing the concepts of surrealism and imagery, as ...
    Related: elizabeth, american poets, new england, writing style, punctuation
  • Hamlet Brutal Truth - 1,127 words
    Hamlet Brutal Truth Annonymous For decades, Guy Debord’s The Society of the Spectacle was only available in English in a so-called 'pirate' edition published by Black & Red, and its informative—perhaps essential—critique of modern society languished in the sort of obscurity familiar to political radicals and the avant-garde. Originally published in France in 1967, it rarely receives more than passing mention in some of the fields most heavily influenced by its ideas—media studies, social theory, economics, and political science. A new translation by Donald Nicholson-Smith issued by Zone Books last year, however, may finally bring about some well-deserved recognition t ...
    Related: hamlet, modern society, modern state, social theory, favoring
  • His Purpose Was To Express The Totality Of Life And Find The Real Through External - 1,001 words
    His purpose was to express the "totality of life" and "find the real through external experiences". He was celebrated for his elongated figures that followed his break from the surrealists. But, who was Alberto Giacometti? Alberto Giacometti was born in 1901 in the Italian speaking town Borgonova, Switzerland. Being the son of Giovanni Giacometti, an impressionist painter, he was encouraged in art at an early age. Giacometti had great confidence in his drafting ability at the age of 10, and at 14 he began sculpting. When he turned twenty, he moved to Paris to continue his studies but shortly returned home. Back home, Alberto Giacometti studied with the famous sculpture Bourdelle. With him he ...
    Related: external, literary movement, unconscious mind, twentieth century, isolated
  • Jean Arp - 511 words
    Jean Arp Art is a fruit that grows in man, like a fruit on a plant, or a child in its mother's womb, once commented Jean Arp--a remarkable twentieth-century sculptor, painter and poet associated with and a forefather of the Dada and Surrealist movements. The avant-garde artist was born on September 16, 1887 in Strasbourg, France, where he studied at the Ecole des Arts et Mtiers. In 1905, he transferred to the Weimar Academy and then to Paris at the Acadmie Julian in 1908, and subsequent to graduation resumed his painting in Weggis, Switzerland in isolation. By 1912, Jean Arp had become associated with the Blaue Reiter, or Blue Rider, a group of Expressionist artists in Munich, where he exhib ...
    Related: jean, tristan tzara, wassily kandinsky, avant garde, academy
  • Jean Arp - 509 words
    Jean Arp "Art is a fruit that grows in man, like a fruit on a plant, or a child in its mother's womb," once commented Jean Arp--a remarkable twentieth-century sculptor, painter and poet associated with and a forefather of the Dada and Surrealist movements. The avant-garde artist was born on September 16, 1887 in Strasbourg, France, where he studied at the Ecole des Arts et Mtiers. In 1905, he transferred to the Weimar Academy and then to Paris at the Acadmie Julian in 1908, and subsequent to graduation resumed his painting in Weggis, Switzerland in isolation. By 1912, Jean Arp had become associated with the Blaue Reiter, or Blue Rider, a group of Expressionist artists in Munich, where he exh ...
    Related: jean, tristan tzara, avant garde, second wife, cardboard
  • Joan Miro - 968 words
    Joan Miro Working Thesis: The Catalan struggle and Spanish Civil War greatly influenced Joan Mir s art; Miros techniques of forceful strokes with paint and ceramics enable Mir to express his feelings and depict the Catalan peoples struggle through art. I. Surrealism in the 1920s A.) Born into a Catalan culture B.) Intense nationalist activity C.) Masia D.) Clement Greenburg II. Lack of interest in political matters A.) Spanish Civil War B.) Being Catalan C.) Catalan struggle for freedom III. Career in art A.) 1911 enrolled at design school B.) Frances Gal C.) 1914 Mirs earliest painting 1.) Paris-1920/changes 2.) The Hunter IV. Anger in Mirs art A.) Spaces of his art are occupied B.) New ten ...
    Related: joan, miro, spanish civil, modern art, shut
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