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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: subjectivism

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  • Allegory Of Cave Not Essaylots Of Info - 2,868 words
    ... SS. HE COULD NOT UNDER THESE CIRCUMSTANCES COMPETE VERY EFFECTIVELY WITH THE OTHER PRISONERS IN MAKING OUT THE SHADOWS ON THE WALL. WHILE HIS EYESIGHT WAS STILL DIM AND UNSTEADY, THOSE WHO HAD THEIR PERMANENT RESIDENCE IN THE DARKNESS COULD WIN EVERY ROUND OF COMPETITION WITH HIM. THEY WOULD AT FIRST FIND THIS SITUATION VERY AMUSING AND WOULD TAUNT HIM BY SAYING THAT HIS SIGHT WAS PERFECTLY ALL RIGHT BEFORE HE WENT UP OUT OF THE CAVE AND THAT NOW HE HAS RETURNED WITH HIS SIGHT RUINED. THEIR CONCLUSION WOULD BE THAT IT IS NOT WORTH TRYING TO GO UP OUT OF THE CAVE. INDEED, SAYS PLATO IF THEY COULD LAY HANDS ON THE MAN WHO WAS TRYING TO SET THEM FREE AND LEAD THEM UP THEY WOULD KILL HIM. MO ...
    Related: allegory, allegory of the cave, cave, info, human beings
  • Existentialism - 413 words
    Existentialism Existentialism has been defined as a philosophical movement or tendency, emphasizing individual existence, freedom and choice that influences many diverse writers in the 19th and 20th centuries. The philosophical term existentialism came from Jean Paul Sartre, a French philosopher. He combined the theories of a select few German philosophers, the phenomenology of Edmund Husserl, the metaphysics of G.W.F. Hegel and Martin Heidegger, and the social theory of Karl Marx. This philosophy became a worldwide movement. One phenomenon of this theory is its proliferation. Since its creation it has remained a part of contemporary thought. One explanation for this is its applicability to ...
    Related: existentialism, french philosopher, paul sartre, jean paul sartre, radical
  • Free Speech - 1,249 words
    Free Speech The first amendment to the constitution guarantees the right of free speech and of the press. Unfortunately, some individuals have used this right to protect themselves from litigation when they produce material that is pornographic, hateful or when they use ethically questionable methods when reporting a story. The government has attempted to intervene through passing laws and imposing regulations. The problem with placing restrictions on free speech is that the question of who will decide what is appropriate and what is not will inevitably be raised. There are two positions when debating this issue : 1) protect free speech even though some people abuse it or 2) freedom of speec ...
    Related: free speech, freedom of speech, public interest, life story, aristotle
  • Locke - 1,273 words
    ... to truths which are valid only in the field of consciousness. Is it possible to break through this iron ring of phenomenalism and attain knowledge of external beings, essences existing outside the realm of the mind? In order to affirm the existence of external things we need demonstration, since things are not known immediately. Locke admitted this fact explicitly: It is evident the mind knows not things immediately, but only by intervention of the ideas it has of them. (Essay, IV, iv, 2.) Locke believed that he could break the ring of subjectivism in which he had isolated himself, and demonstrate the existence of the three beings that constitute the object of traditional metaphysics: na ...
    Related: locke, existence of god, thomas hobbes, cause and effect, intervention
  • One Of The Most Popular Social Groups Of The Last Three Thousand Years Is Religion Although It Has Existed From Seemingly The - 1,041 words
    One of the most popular social groups of the last three thousand years is religion. Although it has existed from seemingly the beginning of man, it is not yet clear why this organized practice has continued. Religion, as it seems, began to explain several different phenomenon. However, with updates in technology to explain these phenomenon, why do numbers of religious followers seem to be increasing? It can be said that hardly anyone currently believes that god or a series of gods are the cause of rain, fire, and other sorts of everyday occurrences. However, the following of a god or gods is still very much at large, and actually appears to be increasing. This begs the question why. Why has ...
    Related: religion, religion and culture, seemingly, social groups, social identity
  • Power Struggles In Society - 1,745 words
    Power Struggles in Society Mills, Schudson, and Gitlin show different approaches to society and the role of mass media. Each approach helps illustrate a different focus on society. They each hold special relevance in a discussion of the history of societal beliefs. The Mass Society refers to the overall belief C. Wright Mills held in relation to the type of society he believed we live in. Mills began The Power Elite with a bold statement saying, "The powers of ordinary men are circumscribed by the everyday words in which they live, yet even in these rounds of job, family, and neighborhood they often seem driven by forces they can neither understand nor govern" (Mills, 1956, p.3). This openin ...
    Related: democratic society, political power, power elite, business practice, social classes
  • The Case For The Existence Of God - 3,155 words
    The Case For The Existence of God by Bert Thompson, Ph.D. Introduction Either God exists or He doesn't. There is no middle ground. Any attempt to remain neutral in relation to God's existence is automatically synonymous with unbelief. It is far from a "moot" question, for if God does exist, then nothing else really matters; if He does not exist, then nothing really matters at all. If He does exist, then there is an eternal heaven to be gained (Hebrews 11:16) and an eternal Hell to be avoided (Revelation 21:8). The question for God's existence is an extremely important one. One might wonder why it is necessary to present evidence for the existence of God. As Edward Thomson so beautifully stat ...
    Related: existence of god, god's existence, david hume, natural world, refusing
  • The Will To Power - 1,972 words
    the Will to Power In the Will to Power, Nietzsche claims: The will to power interprets (-it is a question of interpretation when an organ is constructed): it defines limits, determines degrees, variations of power. Mere variations of power could not feel themselves to be such: there must be present something that wants to grow and interprets the value of whatever else wants to grow. Equal in that- In fact, interpretation is itself a means of becoming master of something. (The organic process constantly presupposes interpretations.) Part I of this paper unpacks this passage concerning the nature of interpretation to reach the crux of Nietzsche's argument. Part II then contextualizes this argu ...
    Related: human beings, organ, slight, categorize
  • Totalitarian Rule - 1,266 words
    ... the bourgeoisie--or to imposing new legal standards and institutional forms; such is the aim of any revolution and not all peculiarity of totalitarianism. Totalitarian interventions are directed to the basic forms of social life that arise directly from man,s personal nature and political activity. Society is now no longer intended to emerge from the spontaneous unfolding of the individual; it may no longer be all network of relationships of freely reciprocal, cooperative, and oppositional activity. It must now consist of all planned, mechanical continuity of functions; the place of free play to be taken by a precalculated meshing of forces. A typical example of the fundamental characte ...
    Related: totalitarian, totalitarian regime, national socialist, divine justice, defeat
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