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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: stomach

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  • Alcohol Abuse - 1,350 words
    Alcohol Abuse Alcohol is liquid distilled product of fermented fruits, grains and vegetables used as solvent, antiseptic and sedative moderate potential for abuse. Possible effects are intoxication, sensory alteration, and/or anxiety reduction. Symptoms of overdose staggering, odor of alcohol on breath, loss of coordination, slurred speech, dilated pupils, fetal alcohol syndrome (in babies), and/or nerve and liver damage. Withdrawal Syndrome is first sweating, tremors, then altered perception, followed by psychosis, fear, and finally auditory hallucinations. Indications of possible mis-use are confusion, disorientation, loss of motor nerve control, convulsions, shock, shallow respiration, in ...
    Related: abuse, alcohol, alcohol abuse, alcohol consumption, alcohol dependence, alcohol syndrome, blood alcohol
  • Alcohol Abuse - 1,364 words
    ... get a BAC that high? A 160 pound man will have a BAC of about .04, 1 hour after consuming two 12-ounce beers on an empty stomach. Your BAC will depend on how much you weigh, how much you drink, amount of time since your last drink and your gender. Women metabolize alcohol differently from men, causing women to reach higher BAC's at the same doses. Recent research is showing that true substance dependence may be caused, in part, by brain chemistry deficiences. That is one reason that substance dependence is considered a disease. And, as with other diseases, there is the possibility of taking medicine to get better. There is now promising evidence that taking medicine can correct some of ...
    Related: abuse, alcohol, alcohol abuse, alcohol and drugs, alcohol syndrome, blood alcohol, drink alcohol
  • Alcohol Is The Intoxicating Part Of Beer, Wine And Liquorsthe Part That Causes Drunkenness It Is Formed During Fermentation, - 1,051 words
    Alcohol is the intoxicating part of beer, wine and liquors-the part that causes drunkenness. It is formed during fermentation, the process that creates the alcohlolicbeverage. When sugars from the fruits or grains are combined with yeast and water, alcohol results. Alcohol is a drug and, like all drugs, it has an effect on a persons body and mind. Because drinking alcoholic beverages makes some people feel more alive and more outgoing, alcohol is sometimes seen as a stimulant. But in fact it is a depressant, and slows down the central nervous system, of which the brain is a part. Small amounts of alcohol can affect a persons coordination and judgment. Drinking a large amount of alcohol at on ...
    Related: alcohol, alcohol consumption, alcohol syndrome, blood alcohol, drink alcohol, drunkenness, fetal alcohol
  • Alcohol: A Fatal Attraction - 1,621 words
    Alcohol: A Fatal Attraction According to Lang nine out of ten high school seniors have used alcohol, one out of twenty use it daily, and one out of three will get drunk during any given weekend (back cover). Teenage drinking is a very serious problem that is growing by the day in our country. I want to know what kids who drink are getting themselves in to when they decide to start in high school or junior high. What types of health and psychological problems will they be facing? What are the chances that they will become addicted to alcohol, or to some other drug, for life? My father is an alcoholic and has been so for most, if not all, of his life. He began drinking at about the age of twel ...
    Related: attraction, fatal, nervous system, family history, vogler
  • Alcoholism - 1,537 words
    Alcoholism Alcoholism, Alcohol is liquid distilled product of fermented fruits, grains and vegetables used as solvent, antiseptic and sedative for potential abuse. Possible effects are intoxication, sensory alteration, and anxiety reduction. Symptoms of overdose staggering, odor of alcohol on breath, loss of coordination, slurred speech, dilated pupils, fetal alcohol syndrome in babies, and nerve and liver damage. Withdrawal Syndrome is first sweating, tremors then altered perception, followed by psychosis, fear, and finally auditory hallucinations. Indications of possible miss-use are confusion, disorientation, and loss of motor nerve control, convulsions, shock, shallow respiration, involu ...
    Related: alcoholism, school counselor, alcohol and drugs, physical system, solve
  • Alcoholism Is A Wideranging And Complex Disease That Heavily Plagues Society Drinking Is Defined As The Consumption Of A Liqu - 1,066 words
    Alcoholism is a wide-ranging and complex disease that heavily plagues society. Drinking is defined as the consumption of a liquid, and/or the act of drinking alcoholic beverages especially to excess. Every year alcohol is responsible for 1/2 of all murders, accidental deaths, and suicides; 1/3 of all drowning, boating, and aviation deaths; 1/2 of all crimes; and almost 1/2 of all fatal automobile accidents (Overview 1). Alcohol is a potent nonprescription drug sold to anyone over the national legal drinking age, 21. Unlike carbohydrates, fats, and proteins, which can be manufactured by the body, alcohol is a substance that is not made within the body. It is a food, because it supplies a conc ...
    Related: alcoholism, binge drinking, consumption, drinking, drinking age, drinking coffee, heavily
  • Alcoholism Is A Wideranging And Complex Disease That Heavily Plagues Society Drinking Is Defined As The Consumption Of A Liqu - 1,012 words
    ... igestive enzymes, which can irritate the stomach wall, producing heartburn, nausea, gastritis, and ulcers. The stomach of a chronic drinker loses the ability to adequately move food and expel it into the duodenum, leaving some food always in the stomach, causing sluggish digestion and vomiting. Alcohol may also inflame the small and large intestine (Overview 4). Moderate daily drinking may be good for the heart, but for many the risks outweigh the benefits. Even one binge may produce irregular heartbeats, and an alcohol abuser experience increased risk of high blood pressure, heart attacks, heart arrhythmia, and heart disease. Alcohol may cause cardiomyopathy (a disease of the heart musc ...
    Related: alcoholism, consumption, drinking, heart disease, heavily, legal drinking
  • Alcoholismnature Or Nuture - 1,570 words
    ... havior. Experiments have shown those males exhibit higher levels of aggression than do females. The aggressive behavior starts in the adolescent stages of life and may continue into adulthood. Where does the aggressiveness originate? Part of the explanation is that children who are sociable and spontaneous exhibit more aggressive behavior than those who do not. Surprisingly, common traits amongst these children are being first born, having a stable family life and a shy temperament. More current, up to date explanation state that aggression is learned response to frustration and by observing others who exhibit the same aggressive behavior. Males also are at greater risk for developing cr ...
    Related: environmental factors, drug abuse, sexual abuse, sitting, dependence
  • Alternative Medicine - 1,408 words
    Alternative Medicine Chiropractic is the third largest doctoral-level health profession in the United States, after medicine and dentistry. This form of health care is on the rise and there are more than forty thousand chiropractors in practice in all fifty states, the District of Columbia, and many other nations. Chiropractic is a form of alternative medicine commonly used and accepted today. Chiropractic is specifically defined as a therapeutic system of curing ailments and manipulation of various body parts, particularly the spinal column. Although chiropractors have had a hard time establishing a worthy reputation, times have changed and studies are proving the benefits of chiropractic. ...
    Related: alternative medicine, medicine, district of columbia, back pain, ultrasound
  • An Indepth Look At Hg Wells - 1,395 words
    An Indepth Look At H.G. Wells Herbert George Wells was born on September 21, 1866 in Bromley, England, the last of four children. His mother was a house cleaner and his father was a shopkeeper. When he was eight years old, he broke his leg, spent a lot of time reading, and discovered an intense interest in books. At the age of thirteen, his father was injured in an accident so Wells had to leave school and work for a draper. He hated this work and managed to change his employment by working for his uncle and becoming a part-time tutor. This gave him the opportunity to continue his studies in his free time. He finally won a scholarship to The Normal School of Science in London. He worked as a ...
    Related: h. g. wells, jules verne, world war i, modern science, novelist
  • An Unlikely Murderer - 1,776 words
    An Unlikely Murderer One would think that crimes with such a gruesome nature would be committed by a hatchet-wielding maniac as put by Russell Aiuto (1). But rather, the suspect was that of a church-going, Sunday-school-teaching, respectable, spinster-daughter(Aiuto 1). The young woman, Lizzie Borden, was charged with the killing of her father and stepmother, a crime worthy of Classical Greek tragedy (Aiuto 1). Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to research the life and trial of Lizzie Borden in order to determine if she was innocent or guilty of parricide, the murder of ones parents. It was on the 19th of July, 1860, that in Fall River, Massachusetts Lizzie Borden was born (Radin 268). ...
    Related: murderer, lizzie borden, encyclopedia americana, classical greek, acid
  • Anabolic Steroids - 1,099 words
    Anabolic Steroids Anabolic steroids (steroids for short) are used widely among bodybuilders to increase their testosterone, thus to get stacked or larger. Steroids seem to be a wonderful thing for these bodybuilders, but very few of them know just how they work and what the effects are. History The word "anabolic" portrays any substance, which accumulates nitrogen in muscle protein and from there builds muscle tissue. The bodys natural anabolic steroid is called testosterone, which men (naturally) obtain more of, than women do. Testosterone brings on the development of speed, mass, endurance, definition, and strength. Testosterone is naturally released into the blood stream, goes to differen ...
    Related: anabolic, anabolic steroids, steroid use, steroids, protein synthesis
  • Analisis Of Tobias Wolff - 1,408 words
    Analisis Of Tobias Wolff Tobias Wolff is a strange writer whose work is so absolutely clear and hypnotic that a reader wants to take it apart and find some simple way to describe why it works so beautifully(Tobias Wolff, This Boys Life [back cover]). Although sometimes taking place in such foreign locations as Vietnam, Wolffs stories are predominantly based on banal situations and people. The magic in his writing though is the fact he draws the reader into the story at all times. He does so by connecting his characters and their conflicts to the reader, be it through quirks, qualities or quandaries. Wolff perfects these concepts by writing in his own lucid, terse style. The tales in Wolffs [ ...
    Related: analisis, tobias, wolff, good friends, north american
  • Analysis Of An Essay On Abortion - 925 words
    Analysis of an essay on Abortion How is Selzez a Philosopher, as well as, a Doctor? Abortion is a tremendous issue in our society today. As well as the article Abortion by Selzer, I have also read Mortal Lessons, a book he had also written. Selzer is an author who wrote in order to describe unsparingly the surgeons art, opening up the body to view one part at a time. The article Abortion classifies him as a doctor, but the way in which he writes makes him a philosopher as well. Selzer not only writes about the physical aspects of surgery, but also the emotional and psychological sides that agree with it. In the essay Abortion, Selzer took presence during an abortion procedure: I am present b ...
    Related: abortion, birth control, unborn child, psychological aspects, crying
  • Ancient Egyptian Medicine - 1,065 words
    ... le from the Fourth Dynasty that indicates that there was an attempt to drill a hole in one of the teeth. Possibly the first prosthesis was found in 1929 in Giza where two teeth were found with gold wire fixed to the teeth. Also they have found several mummies with artificial teeth. The study of several mummies indicates poor teeth condition. This can be attributed to the lack of nutrition, mostly lower class citizens. In the Papyrus Ebers, they found parts of a dental monograph titled "The Beginning of Remedies for Stronger Teeth." Carious teeth were treated with a mixture of ocher, flour, spelt, and honey. Fillings were made out of a combination of malachite and resin. The Ancient Egypt ...
    Related: ancient egyptians, egyptian, medicine, modern medicine, lower class
  • Ancient Olympics - 1,392 words
    ... e athlete could grip it. Varying in weight, their main purpose was to increase the length of the jump. On one side of the fifty foot jumping pit, there was a fixed point called the bater. This was a point from where all jumps were measured. By swinging the halteres and getting a running start, the athlete would then jump and hold onto the weights until the end of his flight, then throw them backwards. He then came down onto the soil with his feet together, with his jumped being measured with a wooden rod called a kanon. A good jumper needed quick acceleration within the limited runway. Coordination and power was essential in using the bater for proper spring in their jump. It all had to ...
    Related: ancient greece, olympics, true meaning, vice versa, agility
  • Andy Warhols Impact On Art - 1,592 words
    Andy Warhol's Impact On Art andy warhol's impact on art Page 1 Andrew Warhola was born August Sixth, 1928, in Pittsburgh Pennsylvania. He was the youngest son of Julie and Andrej Warhola, both immigrants from Czechoslovakia. After a quiet childhood spent alternately alone and in art classes, Andrew went to college. He then got a job doing commercial art, largely advertisements for large companies. Over time his name was shortened and Andy Warhol changed the face of modern art. Through his silver lined Factory and the many people who frequented it a revolution was born. This paper will discuss some of these people and examine the impact they all made on modern art. Ruska Dolina was a small Ru ...
    Related: andy, andy warhol, eastern european, school dropout, span
  • Animal Cruelty - 1,038 words
    ... to determine what constitutes a lethal dose of a particular substance. The test spans a time period from two weeks to sever years, depending on the amount of toxic chemicals in the product being tested. The animals are observed daily. Since chemicals are bitter-tasting and have an unpleasant smell, animals refuse to swallow them. The animals are then forced to swallow the substances in the form of capsules or pellets. they are also force-fed liquid chemicals by stomach tube, or through a hole cut in the animal's throat. Some animals die from the sheer bulk of the dosage administered or from the severe burns they Albrecht 7 receive in the throat and stomach from the chemicals used in pro ...
    Related: animal cells, animal cruelty, animal testing, cruelty, estee lauder
  • Animal Experimentation - 660 words
    Animal Experimentation Annually, millions of animals suffer and die in painful tests in order to determine the safety of cosmetics. Substances like eye shadow and soap are tested on rabbits, guinea pigs, rats, dogs, and many other animals, despite the fact that the test results do not help prevent or treat human illness or injury. Cosmetics are not required to be experimented on animals, and since non-animal alternatives exist, it's difficult to understand why some companies still choose to conduct these brutal and unnecessary tests. Cosmetic companies murder millions of animals every year just to put a few more dollars into their pockets. The companies who perform these tests claim that the ...
    Related: animal experimentation, animal testing, animal welfare, experimentation, food and drug administration
  • Animal Testing - 1,131 words
    ... rted to research facilities, and they suffered from cramping and over heating. The lack of adequate ventilation and extremes in temperature caused death to over 55 percent of the guinea pigs, hamsters and rabbits on their way to the research laboratory. This is not an isolated case, every year in Britain alone millions of animals suffer and die in laboratory experiments. They are burnt, scalded, poisoned and starved, given electric shocks and addicted to drugs, they are subjected to near freezing temperatures, reared in total darkness from birth and deliberately inflicted with disease like arthritis, cancer, diabetes, oral infections, stomach ulcers, syphilis, herpes and AIDS, (Sharpe, 1 ...
    Related: animal experimentation, animal research, animal testing, testing, using animals
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