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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: stimulus

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  • Drugs As Stimulus - 616 words
    Drugs As Stimulus Throughout life we are subjected to countless stimuli, and our responses to those stimuli shape and affect our lives and those surrounding us. This example of real life classical conditioning is one that took a negative affect on a close friend of mine. My senior year in high school my friend formed a new group of people he associated with. This was not a problem until drugs entered the equation, and soon after he began to associate drug use with fun, and enjoyment whereas before just hanging out with his new friends provided his fun and enjoyment. This conditioning occurred because he was too ignorant to realize that it was his friends and not the drugs that provided the g ...
    Related: drug addicts, drugs, stimulus, unconditioned stimulus, real life
  • Lab: Determining What Type Of Stimulus Info Is More Easily Remembered - 1,498 words
    Lab: Determining What Type of Stimulus Info is More Easily Remembered Abstract A single subject study took place where a male, university student, willingly took part in helping determine what type of stimulus information is more easily remembered. The two types of stimulus introduced were meaningful (CVC) and randomized (CVC). The number of errors made among the two stimuli was also studied. This experiment was done using a computer generated program on verbal learning. Using this program, the subject was presented with seven items of stimuli (CVC) and was to remember what each stimuli was in the correct order. It was found that there are more correct responses when meaningful stimulus is u ...
    Related: determining, info, stimulus, short-term memory, correct answer
  • Short Time Recall As A Function Of Type Of Stimulus And Length Of Delay Interval - 1,687 words
    Short Time Recall As A Function Of Type Of Stimulus And Length Of Delay Interval Abstract We were interested in examining patterns of short-term information recall. We used the Brown-Peterson distractor technique to investigate the effects of stimuli type and delay interval on recall for 17 Ss. Each S was tested under 4 conditions, combined of word triads or nonsense syllables triads, with a short (10-sec) or long (45-Sec) delay interval. S read aloud the visually presented stimulus items, and aurally recalled them after the delay interval, in which S was engaged in counting backwards in threes from a presented 3-digit number. Measures were taken only for recall proportion. Results suggest a ...
    Related: delay, interval, length, recall, short term, stimulus
  • A Comparison Of Macbeth And Crime And Punishment - 1,336 words
    A Comparison of Macbeth and Crime and Punishment Shakespeares Macbeth and Dostoevskys Crime and Punishment explore the psychological depths of man. These two works examine tragedy as represented through the existential beliefs of many philosophers. Existentialist theory expresses the idea that man can satisfy his own needs, regardless of social codes, if he has the energy and ambition to act. Both Macbeth and Raskolnikov have the ambition to act, but each struggles internally with their actions, frightened of the consequences. Although these works examine the tragedy and remorse of Macbeth and Raskolnikov, the idea of a driving force within each character remains evident. Ultimately, William ...
    Related: comparison, crime, crime and punishment, macbeth, punishment
  • A Current Look At Japans Financial And Political Risk - 985 words
    ... me of the worlds most powerful banks, also Japanese. The term "Mof-tan" combines the ministrys acronym with part of the Japanese word "tanto", meaning "person in charge". If the banks of Japan were able to persuade the "person in charge" they then would have the ability to change the rules of the game in which they play, and without a doubt these adjustments would work in their favor. This type of scandalous action would not only create an unleveled playing field but eliminated the Japanese method of monitoring and obtaining information about the validity and integrity of Japanese banking policies. The only answer to the problem would be to eliminate the Mof-tan and create a new way to g ...
    Related: financial sector, political risk, democratic party, japanese economy, resign
  • A Modest Proposal: A Different Version - 1,024 words
    A Modest Proposal: A Different Version I am among the 850 people that attend Jesuit Prep. Each day at Jesuit Prep, we attend 8 grueling classes with 45 minutes of monotonous teaching about many subjects. Within each classroom, all the beady eyes of each student stare off into either space or the hanging clock on the opposite wall. As the 45 minutes tick away and the teacher rambles about a subject, the second and minute hand on the clock seem to slow down, then stop their rotational turns. While the clock appears to stop, often our heads droop down, at where we are sitting, till they reach a comfortable position upon our arms which we have placed across our desks. Once this repetitive classr ...
    Related: modest, modest proposal, version, high school, labor force
  • A Natural Curiosity By Margaret Drabble - 471 words
    A Natural Curiosity by Margaret Drabble Running along the same lines as a daytime soap opera, Margaret Drabbles A Natural Curiosity provides pertinent information about life in Northam, England, a small, quaint town just outside of London, during the mid to late 1900s. Drabble narrates the novel in third person omniscient which allows her to venture into the minds of the diverse characters. Although there exists a black and white central conflict, all of the minor conflicts stem from Alix Bowen, the first, and most essential individual. In one way or another, all of the people share some distinct connection with Alix Bowen. Drabbles description of Alix Bowens obsession with a murderer named ...
    Related: curiosity, margaret, third party, gentleman, infatuation
  • Add And Learning Strategies - 1,641 words
    Add And Learning Strategies Attention can be defined as the process of selecting certain environmental inputs needed for cognitive processing. Information that we are capable of sensing stays with us in the sensory register for a very brief period of time. From this point the information is cognitively processed. The role of attention can be found in the moving of this information from the sensory register into the working memory. Normal attention span seems to develop in three stages. First, the childs attention is said to be overly exclusive. This is a term used by psychologists to describe attention that is focused on a single object for a long period of time while tuning out all other st ...
    Related: classroom learning, learning environment, learning experience, learning strategies, family history
  • Aggression Biological Theory Vs Behaviorist Theory - 1,254 words
    Aggression - Biological Theory vs Behaviorist Theory Aggression is a problem that affects all members of society. There is no doubt that aggression pays off for some. Parents who yell and threaten punishment get results. The child who hits the hardest gets the toy. The brother who is willing to be the most vicious in a fight wins. The teacher who gives the hardest test and threatens to flunk the most students usually gets the most study time from students. The spouse who threatens to get the maddest gets their way. The male who acts the most macho and aggressive gets the praise of certain groups of males. For decades psychologists have attempted to find the causes of aggression. The focus of ...
    Related: aggression, aggression in children, behaviorist, biological, biological factors
  • Aggressive Behavior - 1,312 words
    Aggressive Behavior Aggression is a behavioral characteristic that refers to forceful actions or procedures (such a deliberate attack) with intentions to dominate or master. It tends to be hostile, injurious, or destructive, and is often motivated by frustration (The Merriam-Webster Dictionary, 1995). For an individual, aggressive behavior is considered understandable and normal under appropriate circumstances, but when it is frequent, intense, lasting, and pervasive, it is more likely to be a symptom of a mental disorder. Likewise, aggression between groups, can be in the form of healthy competition, but can become harmful when unfair or unjust disadvantage or frustration is perceived, lead ...
    Related: abnormal behavior, aggressive, aggressive behavior, behavioral therapy, social norms
  • Agression - 2,144 words
    Agression Aggression Aggression is a critical part of animal existence, which is an inherent driving force to humans, as we, too, are animals. The source of aggression within humans is a long summative list, but before trying to understand its source one must apply a working definition of aggression. Aggressive behavior is defined by Encyclopedia Britannica as any action of an animal that serves to injure an opponent or prey animal or to cause an opponent to retreat. (7) David G. Myers states that aggression is any physical or verbal behavior intended to hurt or destroy.(9) There are many types of aggressive behaviors, which can be differentiated from the factual act to the hidden motives. F ...
    Related: agression, slave labor, final solution, verbal behavior, track
  • Alcoholism - 2,059 words
    Alcoholism alcoholism Definitions and causal factors of alcoholism Alcoholism consists of a repetitive intake of alcoholic beverages to an extent that the drinker is harmed. The harm may be physical or mental; it may also be social or economic. Implicit in the conception of alcoholism as a disease is the idea that the person experiencing repeated or long-lasting injury from his drinking would alter his behaviour if he could. His failure to do so shows that he cannot help himself, that he has lost control over drinking. This conception incorporates the idea of addiction or dependence. Formal definitions of alcoholism vary according to the point of view of the definer. A simplistic, old-fashio ...
    Related: alcoholism, affective disorder, social factors, world war ii, relation
  • Animal Behavior - 2,263 words
    Animal Behavior Biology lb Abstract Animal behavior is predictable. Their behavioral tendencies are influenced by the relationship of its anatomy to their environment. By observing various forms of life, and associating the mechanism of their abilities to perform a behavioral action, evolutionary influence thereafter, can be analyzed and deduced from that point. Introduction The science and study of animal behavior involve an enormous array of complicated factors. For instance, stereotyped responses are unlearned behavioral reactions to some environmental stimulus predicated upon an organism relationship to its physical environment and anatomy. This obviously begs the question; is the observ ...
    Related: animal behavior, more important, field trip, guinea pig, incredible
  • Animal Testing - 1,686 words
    Animal Testing Please Read This Warning Before You Use This Essay for Anything (It Might Save Your Life) Animal Testing Using animals for testing is wrong and should be banned. They have rights just as we do. Twenty-four hours a day humans are using defenseless animals for cruel and most often useless tests. The animals have no way of fighting back. This is why there should be new laws to protect them. These legislations also need to be enforced more regularly. Too many criminals get away with murder. Although most labs are run by private companies, often experiments are conducted by public organizations. The US government, Army and Air force in particular, has designed and carried out many ...
    Related: animal experimentation, animal liberation, animal rights, animal testing, testing
  • Antisocial Personality - 1,602 words
    Antisocial Personality The Antisocial Personality is (APD) is a serious disorder that affects many males and cause a great threat to families, friends, and even complete strangers. Most personality disorders may cause an inconvenience to a person▓s family and friends, but usually harm themselves more than others. Antisocial Personality Disorder contrasts from other personality disorders because the defining trait is a predatory attitude toward other people (Smith, 1999). ⌠They have a chronic indifference to and violation of the rights of one▓s fellow human beings.■ (Alterman; Cacciola; McDermott; Mulholland; Newman; & Rutherford, 2000). A common tendency of those with ...
    Related: antisocial, antisocial behavior, antisocial personality disorder, personality, personality disorder
  • Are Your Ears Open - 1,163 words
    Are Your Ears Open "Wisdom is the reward you get for a lifetime of listening when you'd have preferred to talk." (Deep and Sussman 76) Upon studying listening within another course, the vast and somewhat unclear subject began to become clearer. The act of listening entails in-depth processes that elude a majority of people's knowledge. The act of listening involves four main parts: hearing, attention, understanding and remembering. Listening entails a vast amount of information that a majority of people does not know or understand. The common view on listening often does not even involve true listening. People often mistake hearing for listening. Just because you heard something does not nec ...
    Related: ears, verbal communication, addison wesley, eastern michigan, utilize
  • Are Your Ears Open - 1,163 words
    Are Your Ears Open? Are your ears open? Wisdom is the reward you get for a lifetime of listening when youd have preferred to talk. (Deep and Sussman 76) Upon studying listening within another course, the vast and somewhat unclear subject began to become clearer. The act of listening entails in-depth processes that elude a majority of peoples knowledge. The act of listening involves four main parts: hearing, attention, understanding and remembering. Listening entails a vast amount of information that a majority of people does not know or understand. The common view on listening often does not even involve true listening. People often mistake hearing for listening. Just because you heard somet ...
    Related: ears, boca raton, verbal communication, long term memory, prentice-hall
  • Attentional Capture - 1,886 words
    Attentional Capture ABSTRACT: How likely are subjects to notice something salient and potentially relevant that they do not expect? Recently, several new paradigms exploring this question have found that, quite often, unexpected objects fail to capture attention. This, phenomenon known as 'inattentional blindness' has been brought forth by Simon (2000) who raised the intriguing possibility that salient stimuli, including the appearance of new objects, might not always capture attention in the real world. For example, a driver may fail to notice another car when trying to turn. With regards to this, in the context of driver attention, this (draft) proposal predicts that intattentional blindne ...
    Related: capture, recent studies, real world, background information, partially
  • Attentional Capture - 2,008 words
    ... nexpected object were opaque and could occlude each other. If IB in the earlier studies and in this replication were due to some oddity caused by the transparent displays, then subjects should easily detect the umbrella woman and gorilla in these opaque conditions. However, they did not, as approximately 35% of subjects did not see the fully visible umbrella woman and gorilla. In one extra condition, the opaque gorilla stopped halfway across the display, turned to face the camera, thumped its chest, and then exited on the other side of the screen. Even in this condition, half of the observers did not see it. In the static IB paradigm, observers often fail to notice the onset of a new, un ...
    Related: capture, visual perception, video game, bibliography references, vary
  • Baby Eye Testing - 557 words
    Baby Eye Testing U OF T PROFESSORS DEVISE BETTER WAY TO TEST SIGHT IN BABIES In a darkened room at Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children, a baby, its head dotted with electrodes, sits in its mother's lap and watches flashing black and white checkerboards and stripes on a television screen. Soon after the test, doctors will know if the child can see and how well it can see. The testing procedure, which involves measuring brain wave activity prompted by visual stimuli (also called visual evoked potentials or VEP's) has been perfected by Drs. Barry Skarf of the Department of Ophthalmology and Moshe Eizenman of U of T's Institute Their procedure is more accurate than tests used elsewhere because ...
    Related: testing, research council, bottom line, basic research, cues
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