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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: stigma

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  • Aids Related Stigma Since The Appearance Of Aids In The Late Seventies And Early Eighties, The Disease Has Had Attached To It - 1,545 words
    AIDS Related Stigma Since the appearance of AIDS in the late seventies and early eighties, the disease has had attached to it a significant social stigma. This stigma has manifested itself in the form of discrimination, avoidance and fear of people living with AIDS (PLWAs). As a result, the social implications of the disease have been extended from those of other life threatening conditions to the point at which PLWAs are not only faced with a terminal illness but also social isolation and constant discrimination throughout society. Various explanations have been suggested as to the underlying causes of this stigmatization. Many studies point to the relationship the disease has with deviant ...
    Related: aids, aids epidemic, early years, seventies, stigma
  • Aids Related Stigma Since The Appearance Of Aids In The Late Seventies And Early Eighties, The Disease Has Had Attached To It - 1,516 words
    ... lthough some things have changed and laws have been passed, the effects if stigma are still prevalent. Many people still express feelings of fear and hostility towards PLWAs (OHare, et al., 1996). Most of the negative attitudes felt and expressed are irrational but the effects can be devastating. One effect is peoples tendency to avoid all contact with PLWAs which contributes to social isolation. Also, even though legislation has been passed, discrimination still does exist. When asked about the treatment he received at Montreal General Hospital, an HIV positive patient explained that AIDS discrimination is far from being eradicated and that PLWAs are treated in a very negative fashion i ...
    Related: aids, seventies, stigma, issues surrounding, care system
  • Abused Wives - 1,981 words
    Abused Wives "Every three minutes a woman is raped! Every fifteen seconds a woman is battered! Every six hours a woman is battered to death!" (Mckenzie, Cover) Research indicates that half the women in this country will experience some sort of violence, from a husband or boyfriend, in one form or another and more than one-third are battered repeatedly every year. (Wilson, pg. 8) Domestic violence is often dismissed as a problem that affects only a small group of women, however, as the facts show, the problem is not rare. The term "wife abuse" has many definitions: One of these is the use or threat of physical violence against a partner in a primary relationship. Physical violence is defined ...
    Related: wives, equal opportunity, psychological treatment, law enforcement, carolina
  • Achilles Anophtheis Achilles Revisited - 1,653 words
    Achilles Anophtheis (Achilles revisited) The director walked onto the stage, gingerly adjusting his radiation mask in order to fit the microphone beneath it. His nervous cough boomed through the hall. After shuffling the papers on the podium before him, he began. "Welcome ladies and gentlemen of the Pre-Apocalypse Archaeological Society. We have called this session to impart to you a matter of the utmost importance, a discovery of the highest order. As you are aware, our teams have only recently been able to sift through the debris of the razed cities of our belligerent predecessors, thanks to the efforts of our colleagues at the Physical Research Society who, with the aid of Allah, have mad ...
    Related: achilles, revisited, board of directors, oedipus complex, delusion
  • Adoption And Identity Formation - 994 words
    ... y, the adopted child must struggle with the competing and conflictual issues of good and bad parents, good and bad self, and separation from both adoptive parents and images of biological parents. If all adoptions were open, the adoptee would have the ability to know about the traits of each family. He would have an easier task of forming an identity for himself, rather than struggling with the issues of to whom he can relate. If the adolescent has some information about his birth parents, such as ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and religion, Horner and Rosenberg (1991) believe that the following can happen: From the bits of fact that they possess, adopted children develop and elaborate ...
    Related: adoption, formation, identity formation, life cycle, family life
  • Affirmative Action - 1,186 words
    Affirmative Action Affirmative action has been the subject of increasing debate and tension in our society. Affirmative action has divided political parties, communities and campuses across the nation. The basis behind affirmative action is that because of past discrimination and oppression, such as the unequal treatment of women, and the enslavement of African Americans, minorities and women have difficulty competing with their white male counterparts. Tax breaks for home buyers may not be wrong but what is wrong are those who take advantage of all kinds of breaks for themselves while denying affirmative action for the most oppressed of society. The government runs many programs to increase ...
    Related: affirmative, affirmative action, marshall plan, vietnam veterans, recruitment
  • Affirmative Action - 970 words
    Affirmative Action Few social policy issues have served as a better gauge of racial and ethnic divisions among the American people than affirmative action. Affirmative action is a term referring to laws and social policies intended to alleviate discrimination that limits opportunities for a variety of groups in various social institutions. Supporters and opponents of affirmative action are passionate about their beliefs, and attack the opposing viewpoints relentlessly. Advocates believe it overcomes discrimination, gives qualified minorities a chance to compete on equal footing with whites, and provides them with the same opportunities. Opponents charge that affirmative action places unskill ...
    Related: affirmative, affirmative action, minority groups, men and women, roger
  • Affirmative Action - 1,488 words
    Affirmative Action Considering the subject of affirmative action the following questions frequently are raised: Is there a clear understanding of affirmative action roles/goals? What are the pros/cons of these programs? What are the "loop holes" in the system? Does seniority play a role in affirmative action? Addressing these key questions may help us all in our daily routine, as administrators and/or potential administrator in the public/private sector. Affirmative action programs throughout the United States have long been a controversial issue particularly concerning employment practices (public/private) and university student and/or staff recruitment. Most public agencies have some type ...
    Related: action program, affirmative, affirmative action, equal opportunity, self esteem
  • Affirmative Action - 1,487 words
    ... f Prop. 209 permits gender discrimination that is "reasonably necessary" to the "normal operation" of public education, employment and contracting. In 1998, The ban on use of affirmative action in admissions at the University of California went into effect. UC Berkeley had a 61% drop in admissions, and UCLA had a 36% decline. This decline strengthens the position of the Pro side of affirmative action. However, a contingency plan has been established. According to a source (who asked to remain nameless), UC Berkeley has a program to actively recruit more minority students that falls out of the guidelines established by prop. 209. These types of "loop holes" can ultimately hurt the various ...
    Related: action program, affirmative, affirmative action, chicago tribune, public administration
  • Aids In Africa - 1,093 words
    ... condoms and/or other barrier contraceptives, and reduced sexual frequency (Zaba & Gregson, 1998; Gregson, et al., 1999). Biological and behavioral factors among HIV+ men may also impact the fertility rates. In general, researchers have noted that biological factors, including reduced sperm count and reduced frequency of sexual activity related to physical illness, have been more important than behavioral factors (condom use, etc.) when examining males' contributions to the declining fertility rates (Zaba & Gregson, 1998). Orphanhood & Early Childhood Mortality. The data on child mortality and AIDS are more confusing. There is no doubt that AIDS has had a devastating impact on children i ...
    Related: africa, aids, aids epidemic, aids prevention, foreign aid, saharan africa, sub-saharan africa
  • Aids In Africa - 462 words
    Aids In Africa Horrors in the news Action on AIDS in Africa Imagine 40 million hungry and destitute orphans in sub-Saharan Africa by the year 2010 roaming the streets without schooling and work, prime candidates for the criminal gangs, marauding militias and child armies that have slaughtered and mutilated tens of thousands of civilians in countries like sierra Leone and Liberia in the last decade. This is the kind of nightmare that prompted the united nations security council to convene yesterday for an unprecedented examination of health issue- the global spread of ADIS, especially in sub-Saharan Africa, where experts predict that more people will die off AIDS, in the next decade than have ...
    Related: africa, aids, aids prevention, saharan africa, south africa, sub-saharan africa
  • Aids In Detail - 2,050 words
    AIDS In Detail Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Today, despite the continuing production of better antibiotics since the discovery of penicillin, we are facing an infectious disease against which all these drugs are virtually powerless. This disease is spreading inexorably, killing more people and more people each year. AIDS does not know no national boundaries and does not discriminate by race or sex. It is rampaging not only throughout the United States, but also through Africa, India, China, Russia, Europe, South America, and the Caribbean countries. Even infants and children are at risk. AIDS is similar to the bubonic plague or the "BLACK DEATH" that killed perhaps one-third in ...
    Related: aids, aids epidemic, infectious disease, human immunodeficiency, purple
  • Alcohol Related Deaths - 1,125 words
    Alcohol Related Deaths More than 100,000 deaths per year are attributed to alcohol, in the United States. Alcohol-related auto accidents account for approximately 24,000 of these deaths (most often the victims are under 30 years of age), while alcohol-related homicide account for 11,000 and suicide 8,000 deaths. Certain types of cancer, which are partly associated with the consumption of alcohol, contribute to another 17,000 deaths. Alcohol-related strokes are responsible for 9,000 deaths. 25,000 lost lives are due to 12 alcohol-related diseases including cirrhosis of the liver. All these deaths combined are the equivalent of 200 jumbo jetliners crashing and taking the lives of everyone onbo ...
    Related: alcohol, american journal, vitamin c, nobel prize, liver
  • Alcoholism - 2,013 words
    ... times increased consumption of alcohol are cited in evidence. But these data invariably fail to take account of changes in availability or use of facilities, changes in admission or diagnostic policies, or changes in the source of beverages--for example, from unrecorded to recorded supplies. In the Soviet Union a change in the internal political situation with the death of Stalin resulted in a shift from official denial that any significant problem of alcoholism existed to an outcry that its prevalence was widespread and serious, though no statistics were provided. Treatment of alcoholism The various treatments of alcoholism may be classified as physiological, psychological, and social. ...
    Related: alcoholism, carbon dioxide, psychoactive drugs, alcoholics anonymous aa, therapy
  • Alcoholism - 1,188 words
    Alcoholism I am sitting at home playing Nintendo with my roommate, jake, when I hear a knock at the door. I wonder who in the world would be coming over this late at night, because it's after midnight. As I open the door, the tired, bloodshot eyes of my upstairs neighbor, Steve, stare at me. "Hi Sam," Steve says. As he attempts to enter my apartment, he stumbles on the slight rise where the weather strip runs under the door. As he trips, his forehead smashes onto the edge of the coffee table leaving a deep and bloody gash. I run in the bathroom and grab a towel while Jake tries to help Steve. It doesn't take us long to realize that Steve is going to need stitches and is in no condition to dr ...
    Related: alcoholism, alcohol addiction, national academy, public health, concentration
  • America: The Myth Of Equality - 1,313 words
    America: The Myth Of Equality America The Myth of Equality To many, the Unites States serves as the ideal model of democracy for the modern world. Yet, how truly worthy is America of this status? Although it has been said that, "Equality is as American as baseball, hot dogs, and apple pie," one must be extremely critical when analyzing such a statement. By taking a historical perspective to the question of how "equal" American equality actually is, it is simple to recognize how problematic the "Land of the Free" mentality can be. The early America's most prominent thinkers have been sensationalized and given credit for developing a free and equal system. However, one can recognize that their ...
    Related: equality, myth, social equality, social groups, john jay
  • American Indians - 929 words
    American Indians Indians in eastern North America possessed no alcohol at the beginning of the colonial period. By 1800, so much alcohol flowed through the Indian villages east of the Mississippi that each community were forced to decide to take it or not and they made a tragic choice by taking it because it destroyed their cultural. The Indians who drank did so to the point of intoxication enjoyed the experience they got from it. If Indians chose to drink out of frustration and despair, they were not alone; as social scientists have made clear, whenever Western societies undergo periods of rapid transition, rates of drinking increase. Documentary evidence also suggests that some Indians enj ...
    Related: american, american indians, documentary evidence, southern states, transition
  • An Eye For An Eye - 1,150 words
    An Eye For An Eye? The most severe of all sentences is in fact the death penalty. Also known as capital punishment, it's the most severe form of corporal punishment as it requires law enforcement officers to kill the offender. It has been banned in many countries, in the United States, an earlier move to eliminate capital punishment has now been reversed and more and more states are resorting to capital punishment for serious offenses such as murder. Like they say: An Eye for and eye, or a life for a life as it applies in this case. The Bible mentions it, and people have been using it regularly for centuries. One steals from those who have stolen from him, one wrongs those who have wronged h ...
    Related: corporal punishment, crime and punishment, deterrence theory, imprisonment
  • Appraising Gods Property - 1,016 words
    Appraising God's Property Young women face so many challenges in their lifetime, and the book Audios, Barbie displays several of the trials and tribulations that each individual young lady might encounter. The bulk of the stories deal with body image and self-identity, and I chose to focus on a particular story titled, "Appraising God's Property", by Keesa Schreane. She works out in her essay a backward situation of being part of the "in" crowd or the "out" crowd. To emphasize a problem in this area I also located an article to contrast and compare to Keesa's essay, which was written by Fiona Stewart, of Deakin University, concerning the "Implications of Reputation for Young Women's Sexual H ...
    Related: appraising, body image, young people, high school, bulk
  • Arranged Marriage - 633 words
    Arranged Marriage Arranged marriage is a concept that does not take precedence in the United States, where love marriages are most popular. In this presentation we will explore the reasons for arranged marriages and look at the process that goes on. Our group will also relate this topic to such anthropological terms such as dowry and joint family system. Our goal is to help others understand that no matter how different arranged marriages may seem to Americans, they love, procreate and support each other possibly more successfully than our love marriages. Before delving into the intrcacies of the process of arranges marriages we will define our terms so that students will know how to relate ...
    Related: arranged, arranged marriages, family system, the girl, celebrate
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