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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: state court

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  • Clarence Earl Gideon Was Charged In A Florida State Court With Having Broken And Entered A Poolroom With Intent To Commit A M - 365 words
    Clarence Earl Gideon was charged in a Florida state court with having broken and entered a poolroom with intent to commit a misdemeanor. Appearing in court without funds and without a lawyer, Gideon asked the Florida state court to appoint counsel for him, whereupon the following troubles took place. The only way Gideon would be appointed a lawyer if it was a capitol offense. After his conviction, Gideon filed in the Supreme Court of Florida the present habeas corpus petition, attacking his conviction on the grounds that his federal constitutional rights were violated by the trial court's refusal to appoint counsel. The court, without opinion, denied relief. After going back to trial the Sup ...
    Related: clarence, earl, florida, florida state, gideon, intent, state court
  • Ancient Egyptian Medicine - 1,039 words
    Ancient Egyptian Medicine Ancient Egyptian Medicine The Nile river is known almost universally by historians as the cradle of medicine because it passes through the great region of Egypt. Egypt greatly contributed to the western civilization. Their knowledge was far superior to any previous civilization, and many civilizations to come. One of their greatest achievements was in the field of medicine because they replaced myth with medical fact, this laid the foundations for modern medical practice. They discovered the cause of various illnesses and developed a cure. They practiced both medical and spiritual healing so the worlds of religion and science could coexist. With the discoveries of s ...
    Related: ancient egypt, egyptian, medicine, family tradition, state court
  • Buford V, United States - 811 words
    Buford V, United States Brief of BUFORD v. UNITED STATES Certiorari to the united states court of appeals for the seventh circuit No. 99-9073. Argued January 8, 2001--Decided March 20, 2001 TYPE OF CASE. This case has to deal with the certiorari (Latin for "to be informed") from the United States Court of appeals for the seventh district. This case raises a question of the sentencing laws. What is the standard of review as it applies when a court of appeals reviews a trial court's Sentencing Guideline determination as to whether an offender's prior convictions were consolidated, hence "related," for purposes of sentencing? In particular, should the appeals court review the trial court's deci ...
    Related: state court, states constitution, states court, united states constitution, united states court
  • Capital Punishment Is The Legal Infliction The Death Penalty - 1,329 words
    Capital punishment is the legal infliction the death penalty. It is obviously the most severe form of criminal punishment. (Bedau1) Capital punishment is a controversial way of dealing with violent criminals. The main alternative to the death penalty is life in prison. Capital punishment has been around for thousands of years as a means of eradicating criminals. A giant debate started between supporters and opposers of execution, over the morality and effectiveness of the death penalty. The supporters claim that if you take a life you should pay with your life or "an eye for an eye". Opposers of the death penalty bring up the chance of sentencing the innocent and how the death penalty is inh ...
    Related: capital punishment, criminal punishment, death penalty, death row, penalty, punishment
  • Cohen Vs Virginia - 320 words
    Cohen Vs Virginia is Cohens vs. Virginia, in which the question arose as to the right of the Supreme Court to exercise its appellate jurisdiction over the judgment of a state court involving the validity of state legislation. The contention of the counsel for the state struck at the very root of the judicial system of the Union, with its authority to review state decisions which involved the binding effect of the Federal Constitution and laws: and so to the discussion of this fundamental question Marshall brought his heaviest artillery. In a series of powerful paragraphs he proclaimed the principle of nationalism and the existence of a real union resting on the will and determination of the ...
    Related: cohen, virginia, federal constitution, supreme court, literature
  • Griswold V Connecticut - 1,644 words
    Griswold V. Connecticut Griswold v. Connecticut Griswold v. Connecticut appealed to the Supreme Court on errors of the state court of Connecticut. This case deals with the right to prescribe the use of birth control to a married female. This action is found unconstitutional under the state laws, but this law invades a persons rights under the constitution. Here the problem evolves and must be decided upon in the courts. The appellant Griswold is an Executive Director of the Planned Parenthood League of Connecticut (Janosik, 1035). Appellant Buxton is a licensed physician and a professor at Yale Medical School who served as Medical Director for the League at its center in New Haven. This cent ...
    Related: connecticut, griswold, government intervention, medical school, violate
  • Hate Speech On The Internet - 1,849 words
    Hate Speech On The Internet I. Hate Speech on the Internet Generally, hate speech receives constitutional protection and is not prosecuted that is why there are relatively few court cases addressing this issue on the Internet. For this reason, sites containing speech discriminating people because of their race or sexual inclinations are available on the Internet. These include the "Ku Klux Klan," "Nazis," "White Socialist Party," "Skinheads" or "Aryan Nation," for example, which speech is not directed to any person in particular, thus not punishable. In addition, the nature of this medium makes it difficult to trace the perpetrators of hate crime indeed, Web sites are easily relocated or aba ...
    Related: free speech, freedom of speech, hate crime, hate speech, search engine
  • Home School - 1,673 words
    Home School Before the beginning of American public schools in the mid-19th century, home schooling was the norm. Founding father John Adams encouraged his spouse to educate their children while he was on diplomatic missions (Clark, 1994). By the 1840's instruction books for the home were becoming popular in the United States and Britain. The difficulty of traveling to the system of community schools was provoking detractors. At this time, most of the country began moving toward public schools (Clark, 1994). One of the first things early pioneers did was set aside a plot of land to build a school house and try to recruit the most educated resident to be the schoolmarm. This led to recruiting ...
    Related: high school, home school, home schooling, public school, school activities, school children, school district
  • In Cold Blood: Death Penalty Capital Punishment Has Been Part Of The Criminal Justice System Since The Earliest Of Times The - 1,371 words
    In Cold Blood: Death Penalty Capital Punishment has been part of the criminal justice system since the earliest of times. The Babylonian Hammurabi Code(ca. 1700 B.C.) decreed death for crimes as minor as the fraudulent sale of beer(Flanders 3). Egyptians could be put to death for disclosing the location of sacred burial sites(Flanders 3). However, in recent times opponents have shown the death penalty to be racist, barbaric, and in violation with the United States Constitution as "...cruel and unusual punishment." In this country,although laws governing the application of the death penalty have undergone many changes since biblical times, the punishment endures , and controversy has never be ...
    Related: capital punishment, cold blood, criminal, criminal justice, criminal sentencing, death penalty, death row
  • Individuals That Contributed To The Civil War - 1,912 words
    Individuals That Contributed To The Civil War Who Were Some of the Individuals That Contributed to the Coming of the Civil War The Civil War was brought about by many important people, some that wanted to preserve and some that wanted to eradicate the primary cause of the war, slavery. There were the political giants, such as Abraham Lincoln, and Stephen Douglas. There were seditious abolitionists such as John Brown, escaped slaves such as Dred Scott, and abolitionist writers like Harriet Beecher Stowe. These were the people who, ultimately, brought a beginning to the end of what Lincoln called "a moral, a social, and a political wrong"(Oates 66). Southern states, including the 11 states tha ...
    Related: american civil, american civil war, causes of the civil war, civil war, abraham lincoln
  • Mapp Vs Ohio - 1,676 words
    Mapp vs. Ohio The Mapp Vs Ohio Supreme Court Case was a turning point in our nation's history. It changed our legal system by forming the exclusionary rule, which in turn changed the way prosecution of a criminal is performed. On May 23, 1957, three Cleveland police officers arrived at Dolly Mapps home. They had reason to believe that paraphernalia and a fugitive of a recent bombing had been hiding out there. The officers asked if they could search the home without a search warrant, with the advice of her attorney she refused. Three hours later, four more police officers arrived to the scene. They knocked on the door but Ms. Mapp did not respond immediately. The officers then forcibly entere ...
    Related: mapp, ohio, ohio supreme court, police officer, search warrant
  • Marshalls Court - 489 words
    Marshall`s Court Hamilton was a federalist and served as the secretary of the treasury in the 1890s. He was a strong supporter of a centralized federal government. He also advocated loose interpretation of the u.s. constitution and the use of the elastic clause. Which was an ambiguous power of the federal government stating that "congress can do what it is proper and necessary" john Marshalls epitomizing of these Hamiltonian principals and philosophies can be seen in several of his court rulings. Such as, McCulloch vs. Maryland, Dartmouth college vs. Woodward, Gibbons vs. Ogden, and Cohens vs. Virginia. In the case McCulloch vs. Maryland in 1819, Maryland brought a suit against McCulloch and ...
    Related: john marshall, state court, supreme court, interstate commerce, dartmouth college
  • Mississippi Burning - 1,188 words
    Mississippi Burning Mississippi Burning is a truly well-crafted movie about three civil rights workers, two of them white and the third black, who were murdered in Jessup County, Mississippi in 1964. This happens in the middle of the civil rights movement. Mississippi Burning is a rivetting drama based on a shocking true story. I feel Mississippi Burning is a great movie displaying the hateful ways of the south in the sixety's. The movie starts out with the three civil rights workers driving through Jessup County. They noticed that they were being followed by two cars. One of the mysterious cars started to ram the workers' vehicle, and they then desperately attempted to escape their attacker ...
    Related: burning, mississippi, mississippi burning, rights movement, state court
  • Nafta - 1,847 words
    ... e for babies born in Cameron County, TX climbed to 19/10,000 babies, almost twice the national average. The public health crisis plaguing the U.S.-Mexico border attracted intense media scrutiny in 1991 after three babies were born with a rare condition called anencephaly (born brainless) during a 36-hour period at the same Cameron County (Brownsville) Hospital. The Texas Department of Health Neural Tube Defect Surveillance Project reported a new cluster of defects in 1995. The Department recently declared that The entire border area remains a high-risk area [for neural tube defects] compared to the rest of the U.S. As the health crisis looms overhead, so too does the disparity in wage le ...
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  • Oregon V Elstad - 1,798 words
    Oregon V Elstad OREGON v ELSTAD 470 U.S. 298, 105 S. Ct. 1285, 84 L.Ed. 2d 222 (1985) MERITS: Officers Burke and McAllister of the Polk County, Oregon Sheriff's office, on the basis of a witness' statement, obtained an arrest warrant for Michael Elstad, who was suspected of burglary. The officers went to Elstad's home and were escorted to his room by his mother. After instructing the respondent to dress and accompany them to the living room, Officer McAllister took Elstad's mother into the kitchen while Officer Burke stayed with the respondent. Without advising Elstad of his Miranda rights, Officer Burke asked him whether he was aware of the officer's reason for wanting to talk with him, and ...
    Related: oregon, oregon state, appeals court, due process, curb
  • Pms Premenstrual Syndrome Defense - 839 words
    Pms (Pre-Menstrual Syndrome) Defense The question has been posed, What characteristics of employees, other than those explicitly covered by the Americans with Disabilities Act, can employers consider when hiring, firing, or promoting employees?. This is a question that has become critical to answer, as ADA claims exceeded 91,000 in number between 1992 and 1997. Of these claims, the agency discovered reasonable cause to believe that discrimination occurred in only 3.1% of the cases. Many of these claims were built on seemingly weak foundations. Actual cases of discrimination have been brought (and denied) on claims of disability due to myopia, body odor, infertility, and anxiety brought on by ...
    Related: syndrome, state court, virginia state, customer service, trooper
  • Re: Ingersoll Rand Co V Mcclendon, Page 57 - 338 words
    Re: Ingersoll -Rand Co. v. McClendon, page 57 Date: 1-4-99 FACTS: Perry McClendon, plaintiff, was an employee of Ingersoll-Rand Co., defendant, for nine years. Plaintiff felt he was fired short of his ten years of service so defendant could avoid pension obligations. Plaintiff sued for wrongful discharge. Defendant argues that plaintiffs common law claim was preempted by the ERISA (Employee Retirement Income Security Act). ARGUMENTS: Plaintiff: Wrongful discharge Defendant: Terminated at will and common law case was preempted by ERISA provisions. ISSUE(S) An ERISA plan exists and the employer had a pension-defeating motive in terminating the employment of plaintiff. HOLDING: EIRSAs explicit ...
    Related: rand, business today, public policy, case study, terminating
  • Supreme Court - 1,040 words
    Supreme Court The Supreme Court has had many different places where it was located over the years. There has been a struggle to find a permanent home for the most powerful court of law. At first, the meetings were in the Merchant Exchange Building in New York City. The court then followed the nation's capitol to Philadelphia in 1790. In 1800 the court again relocated to Washington DC. At first they spent their time meeting in various places. The place to find the Supreme Court now is in Washington DC, on First Street located in Northeast. The Supreme court was created during the Constitutional Convention of 1787 during which the delegates discussed the necessity of a Supreme Court. The two m ...
    Related: court justices, court system, florida supreme court, high court, state court, state supreme court, states supreme court
  • The Conflict Of Interest Inherit In Administrative Review - 2,807 words
    The Conflict Of Interest Inherit In Administrative Review The Conflict of Interest Inherit in Administrative Review and the Ineffectiveness of the Current Standard of Review by U.S. District Courts Law and Medicine By # I. Introduction The Employee Retirement Income Security Act, better known as ERISA, has been a major issue in healthcare litigation since its inception in 1974. ERISA governs any claim centering on health insurance, disability insurance, or any other employer provided benefits. ERISA affects many aspects of the American legal system, from inter-state commerce to bankruptcy, and particularly insurance and healthcare law. ERISA contains clauses for both the procedure and subs ...
    Related: administrative, conflict of interest, inherit, benefit plans, hospital care
  • The Proposed Legalization Of Samesex Marriage Is One Of The - 1,309 words
    The proposed legalization of same-sex marriage is one of the most significant issues in contemporary American family law. Presently, it is one of the most vigorously advocated reforms discussed in law reviews, one of the most explosive political questions facing lawmakers, and one of the most provocative issues emerging before American courts. If same-sex marriage is legalized, it could be one of the most revolutionary policy decisions in the history of American family law. The potential consequences, positive or negative, for children, parents, same-sex couples, families, social structure public health, and the status of women are enormous. Given the importance of the issue, the value of co ...
    Related: interracial marriage, legalization, same-sex marriage, federal court, same-sex couples
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