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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: spies

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  • Civil War Spies - 1,032 words
    Civil War Spies Male and female spies were essential sources of information during the Civil War. The best spies were people you would never suspect. Spies were brave, faceless and they knew the environment very well. Their presence was incredibly excepted. Whether they dressed as men and joined the army, posed as mindless slaves, or just kept their ears opens in collective circles, spies provided necessary information. It was even a woman spy who provided Union battle plans to Confederate Army, which allowed them to win the First Battle of Manassass (First Bull Run). Throughout history, men have been spies and the American Civil War was no exception. The finest spies are people you would ne ...
    Related: american civil, american civil war, civil war, spies, confederate general
  • Civil War Spies - 1,027 words
    ... few excellent ones. Phillip Henson, was one of the very few excellent spies. He was born and raised in Alabama, but when the war began he was outcast from his family. He was then living in Mississippi, and lived there as a loyal Unionist. He avoided Confederate Military service by convincing the owner of a plantation to make him the manager of the plantation. In 1862 General U.S. Grant came to Mississippi, and Henson began his career as a Union Spy. After he completed his first mission - that of buying as much cotton as he could for the Union - he was then sent to work for General William Rosencrans. Henson was returning from a mission behind confederate lines when the Union stopped him. ...
    Related: american civil, american civil war, civil war, spies, robert e. lee
  • 1954 - 1,704 words
    1954 In the year 1954, the United States was changing rapidly. President Eisenhower, a Republican, was in the midst of his first term. Eisenhower had just announced to the world that the United States had in fact developed and successfully tested the first hydrogen bomb some two years prior. Mamie Eisenhower christened the Nautilus, which was the first submarine to run on nuclear power. The great court decision, Brown vs. the Board of Education, called for the integration of the countrys public schools. Arkansas and Alabama refused to integrate and President Eisenhower was forced to send the 101st Airborne Division to integrate the schools of these states. The phrase Under God was added to t ...
    Related: washington monument, new zealand, southeast asia, emotion, police
  • 1984 - 611 words
    1984 Winston Smith, the main character, works in London, at the Ministry of Truth. London is a city in Airstrip One, a Province of Oceania. A government that goes by the name Big Brother has taken over the world. The Party with Big Brother as its leader rules Oceania, a state and one of the great powers of the world. Winston hates the life he lives under the inflexible government and decides to write down his thoughts in a diary. This is considered a crime in Oceania and Winston knows that. And he knows one day he will be discovered by the Thought Police. To keep the members of this party occupied, frequent two minute Hate Sessions are held to accuse the enemies of the party such as Emmanuel ...
    Related: 1984, winston smith, great powers, big brother, pretending
  • A Farewell To Arms By Ernest Hemingway 1899 1961 - 1,322 words
    A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway (1899 - 1961) A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway (1899 - 1961) Type of Work: Psychological realism Setting Italy and Switzerland; World War I Principal Characters Fyederic Henry, an American in the Italian army Catiteritte Barkley, a British nurse Rinaldi, an Italian surgeon and Frederic's friend Miss Ferguson, a British nurse and Catherine's friend Story Overveiw Lieutenant Frederic Henry, a handsome young American, had returned from leave in southern Italy to the front, where he served in the Italian ambulance corps. The war was still leaning toward victory for the Italians. During dinner, Lieutenant Rinaldi, Frederic's jovial surgeon friend needl ...
    Related: a farewell to arms, ernest, ernest hemingway, farewell, farewell to arms, hemingway
  • A Midsummer Night Dream - 1,514 words
    A Midsummer Night Dream Jennifer Lopez Period 7 English Book Report The Mixed up Troubles of Love A Midsummer's Night Dream is one of Shakespeare's romantic/comedy plays. This play is about love and all the troubles that it brings to people. It also has a side story about a pompous actor who has a mysterious dream in the forest. The four main characters are all trying to find love with one another and when magic is involved it causes more cause between the four than it does to help. The play is set in Monte Athena, Italy in the nineteenth century. The main characters are the four lovers Hermia, Lysander, Helena and Demetrius. The Duke and his fiance Queen Hipolyta, Puck the mischievous creat ...
    Related: dream, midsummer, midsummer night, midsummer's night, night dream
  • A Short History Of Antisemitism In Germany - 779 words
    A Short History of Anti-Semitism in Germany A Short History of Anti-Semitism in Germany The Second World War has left an unmistakable impression on the whole of Europe that will never be forgotten. Whether visible to the naked eye, or hidden in the consciousness of its people, the war has scarred Europe indelibly. Historically, the foremost recognizable perpetration against Europeans was Adolf Hitlers "Final Solution to the Jewish question". This sophisticated operation of systematic mass execution was calculated, organized, and carried out with such horrifying efficiency that only a madman could have been responsible for such an act, and Hitler was indeed mad. However, Anti-Semitism had bee ...
    Related: antisemitism, german history, germany, history, short history
  • A Tale Of Two Cities Two Cities - 1,154 words
    A Tale of two cities - Two Cities Two Cities Jarvis Lorry, an employee of Tellson's Bank, was sent to find Dr. Manette, an unjustly imprisoned physician, in Paris and bring him back to England. Lucie, Manette's daughter who thought that he was dead, accompanied Mr. Lorry. Upon arriving at Defarge's wine shop in Paris, they found Mr. Manette in a dreadful state and took him back to London with them. Mr. Manette could not rember why he had been imprisoned, or when he was imprisoned. He was in a state of Post Tramatic Stress Dis-order. All the years of imporisonment led to his insanity, his life was in danger almost every second of his imprisoned life. In 1780, five years later, Lucie, Mr. Lorr ...
    Related: tale, tale of two cities, central idea, prison experience, imprisonment
  • All American Tragedy - 1,351 words
    All American Tragedy Without a doubt, most Americans can distinctly draw a picture in their minds of John Wilkes Booth ... The Civil War had ended five days previously with the surrender of General Lee. President Lincoln and the first lady had decided to take a night off and see a stage play at the Ford's Theatre. An obviously enraged young actor preceded into the stage box a kills Lincoln, and then exits the theatre by jumping on to the stage and escaping through the back where a horse had been waiting. Booth tried to escape for good, but within two weeks he was killed in a violent ordeal near Bowling Green, VA. From the moment the shot rang out in that theatre, the American people knew who ...
    Related: american, american history, american people, tragedy, president lincoln
  • Animal Farm - 626 words
    Animal Farm As I read the book Animal Farm, I have came to see that the story Animal Farm is a metaphor for the life in the USSR. We see how Animal Farm takes on personalities of social and political figures from the USSR. They relate to the social and political life of The USSR in how they act and live. All the animals have a personality that emulates personality from the Russian Revolution. They plan to take over and make all things equal, by this they hope to give the power to the animals that represent the people of The USSR. Animal Farm has many of its characters take on the characteristics of The Russian Revolution. In so Mr. Jones is compared to Czar Nicholas II . Mr. Jones is the far ...
    Related: animal farm, farm, political figures, make money, communism
  • Animal Farm - 624 words
    Animal Farm As I read the book "Animal Farm", I have came to see that the story "Animal Farm" is a metaphor for the life in the USSR. We see how " Animal Farm " takes on personalities of social and political figures from the USSR. They relate to the social and political life of The USSR in how they act and live. All the animals have a personality that emulates personality from the Russian Revolution. They plan to take over and make all things equal, by this they hope to give the power to the animals that represent the people of The USSR. "Animal Farm" has many of its characters take on the characteristics of The Russian Revolution. In so Mr. Jones is compared to Czar Nicholas II . Mr. Jones ...
    Related: animal farm, farm, russian revolution, make money, unjustly
  • As A Tool For National Security, Counterintelligence Is As Important As The Armed Services, If Not More So By Definition, Cou - 1,129 words
    As a tool for national security, counterintelligence is as important as the armed services, if not more so. By definition, counterintelligence means to counter the information gathering efforts of a hostile intelligence agency. Along side its sister service, intelligence, counter intelligence, helps defend a nation from both internal and external aggression. This is generally done by guarding information storage sites, or by capturing enemy spies. Also, counterintelligence is interchangeably used with counterespionage. Counterintelligence is generally considered the younger, less attractive sister agency to intelligence. While Intelligence is considered to have a gentlemanly air about it; co ...
    Related: armed, counterintelligence, more successful, national intelligence, national security, national strategy
  • Atwoods The Handmaids Tale: A Study Of Rebellion - 1,047 words
    Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale: A Study of Rebellion Rebels defy the rules of society, risking everything to retain their humanity. If the world Atwood depicts is chilling, if 'God is losing,' the only hope for optimism is a vision that includes the inevitability of human struggle against the prevailing order. -Joyce Johnson- Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale analyzes human nature by presenting an internal conflict in Offred: acceptance of current social trends (victim mentality) -vs- resistance for the sake of individual welfare and liberties (humanity). This conflict serves as a warning to society, about the dangers of the general acceptance of social evils and boldly illustrates the int ...
    Related: handmaids tale, margaret atwood, rebellion, internal conflict, little house
  • Atwoods The Handmaids Tale: A Study Of Rebellion - 1,051 words
    ... e to see her daughter and husband someday. So she must survive for their sake because she needs to believe that they are still alive. Her dreams and reality become intertwined and this makes her fight for her sanity. Offred fights to retain her peace of mind. She says , sanity is a valuealble possession; I save it, so I will have enough when the time comes. (Atwood,140) To be sane is to be alive. If she were insane and blindly following orders she would be living, but she wouldn't be alive. Offred lives, as usual, by ignoring.Ignoring isn't the same as ignorance you have to work at it.(Atwood,734) For Offred obedience comes at a great price, Johnson characterizes it as a death of the sen ...
    Related: handmaids tale, margaret atwood, rebellion, social trends, internal conflict
  • Aztec - 1,870 words
    Aztec The Aztec lived in the city of Tenochtitlan, which is a fertile basin about 50 miles long and as wide. Surrounded by mountain ranges and several volcanoes, the Aztec has abundant supply of water. With being 8000ft above sea level the day were mild and the nights are cold during much of the year. The Aztecs name means heron people their name is derived from the mythical homeland to the north called Azatlan. This in mind their language(Nahuatl) also belong to the linguistic family as the Soshonean, a tongue will represented among the Indians of the Untied States. In the Aztecs culture their main principal crop was maize. Maize was usually cooked with lime then ground to make dough, then ...
    Related: aztec, before marriage, american history, young women, agriculture
  • Aztec Empire History - 1,461 words
    ... per class. Aztec society, like all complex societies, had different social classes. People at the top - nobles, high priests, and people important in the military and government - had lives of luxury, with fine houses, clothing, and jewelry. The largest class was made up of commoners, such as farmers, servants, and craftspeople. In Aztec society, commoners were organized into clans, or groups, made up of many different families. Each clan joined people together throughout their lives. Members of a clan all lived in the same district. Merchants formed yet another class in Aztec society, separate from the commoners. The Aztecs carried on a great deal of trade with other Indian nations. Tra ...
    Related: aztec, aztec empire, aztec gods, empire, history
  • Aztec Indians - 1,096 words
    Aztec Indians The Aztec Indians, who are known for their domination of southern and central Mexico, ruled between the 14th and 16th centuries. They built a great empire and developed very modernized ways of doing things. They had phenomenal architectural skills and waterway systems. The Aztec Indians also had very developed social class and government systems and practiced a form of religion. To begin with, the Aztecs were very skilled in the art of Architecture and waterway systems. "An example of the monumental architecture within the Aztec society is the great pyramid of Tenochtitlan. Montezuma I, who was the ruler of the Aztecs in 1466, created it. The pyramid was not finished until the ...
    Related: aztec, aztec empire, aztec religion, external affairs, social structure
  • Aztecs - 1,657 words
    ... The land around the lakes was fertile but not large enough to produce food for the population, which expanded steadily as the empire grew. To make more land suitable for farming, the Aztec developed irrigation systems, formed terraces on hillsides, and used fertilizer to enrich the soil. Their most important agricultural technique, however, was to reclaim swampy land around the lakes by creating chinampas, or artificial islands that are known popularly as floating gardens. To make the chinampas, the Aztec dug canals through the marshy shores and islands, then heaped the mud on huge mats made of woven reeds. They anchored the mats by tying them to posts driven into the lake bed and plant ...
    Related: aztec empire, aztecs, mexico city, spanish conquest, gulf
  • Benedict Arnold - 1,767 words
    Benedict Arnold On January 14, 1741, Benedict Arnold was born in Norwich, Connecticut. (B Arnold) Arnolds father, also named Benedict, had a drinking problem and his mother Hannah often worried. (B Arnold) Arnold received his schooling at Canterbury. (B Arnold) While away at school, a few of Arnolds siblings passed away from Yellow Fever. (B Arnold) Arnold was a troublesome kid that would try just about anything. (B Arnold) As a rebellious 14-year-old boy, he ran away from home to fight in the French and Indian War. (B Arnold) Later, Benedict Arnold deserted and returned home through the wilderness alone to work with his cousins. (B Arnold) The army had excused him without penalty because of ...
    Related: arnold, benedict, benedict arnold, general george, quebec city
  • Branch - 1,159 words
    Branch King a true pillar of civil rights movement By Stuart Levitan, May 22, 1998 Our greatest mass movement has a historian able to tell its overwhelming story. The civil rights movement of the early 1960s, a transcendent time in American life, played out an epochal saga of biblical proportions. The stakes were immense -- first freedom, then the franchise. The risk was absolute. The actors, whether heroic or villainous, were towering figures. Taylor Branch's Pulitzer Prize-winning Parting the Waters'' (1988) was sweeping, subtle, overwhelming, depressing, inspiring. Pillar of Fire,'' second of Branch's movement trilogy, covering 1963-65, is as good or better. Branch chronicles a staggering ...
    Related: branch, justice department, civil rights, civil rights movement, romantic
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