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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: spanish american

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  • Alcatraz Island And Prison - 1,993 words
    Alcatraz Island And Prison Alcatraz Island has quite a distinct history. Many people know that Alcatraz served as a federal prison, but most are reluctant to know that this island served as fort. Built before the Civil War, it served two main purposes. First, that it was to guard the San Francisco bay area from enemy ships against a foreign invasion, and second, to hold hostage prisoners of war or POW's as they were called. In this report, I'll show you how this fortress came to be a federal prison, why it is no longer in operation today, and most importantly, to show why it was built in the first place. When the great Gold Rush of 1849 first started, California grew from what would be consi ...
    Related: alcatraz, federal prison, military prison, prison population, state prison
  • American Expansion - 214 words
    American Expansion In a sense, the United States has been expansionistic from its very beginning. The 13 English colonies, clinging to the eastern seaboard, were determined to push westward despite all natural and political obstacles. Once established as a nation, the United States went about acquiring even more land, including Florida, the Louisiana Purchase, and the Mexican Cession. The expansion associated with the late nineteenth century was just one chapter in a long book. One can begin writting a paper anout expansion of the U.S. beginning with the founding of the colonies. Colonial expansion involved many resons- land hunger, flight from religious persecution, etc.- The next main expa ...
    Related: american, american expansion, expansion, spanish american, open door
  • American Imperialism - 417 words
    American Imperialism The United States became an imperialist nation at the end of the 19th century because Americans wanted to expand over seas with their belief in manifest destiny. The three factors that started American imperialism were political and military competition including the creation of a strong naval force, economic competition among industrial nations and a belief in the racial and cultural superiority of people of Anglo-Saxon decent. The Spanish American War marked the emergence of the United States as a world power. This brief war lasted less than four months from April 25 to August 12, 1898. A number of factors contributed to the United States decision to go to war against ...
    Related: american, american imperialism, central american, imperialism, latin american, spanish american
  • Bilingual Education - 1,651 words
    Bi-Lingual Education Bilingual Education Education is very important. There use to be a time when you didn't have to go to school. When it was only important for men to have an education. Times have really changed. Now it is crucial for everyone in our society to have an education. Survival is the main reason: a cohesive society is another. Our schools today need to keep Bilingual education as a tool for teaching: not only for the sake of our society but also for the sense of our culture. Bilingual education in our schools is crucial: but still there is talk about banning the use of foreign language in the instruction of our young children. We have to work to change that kind of attitude. We ...
    Related: bilingual, bilingual education, education program, education programs, higher education
  • Born In Boston In 1809, Edgar Poe Was Destined To Lead A Rather Somber And Brief Life, Most Of It - 1,157 words
    Born in Boston in 1809, Edgar Poe was destined to lead a rather somber and brief life, most of it a struggle against poverty. His mother died when Edgar was only two, his father already long disappeared. He was raised as a foster child in Virginia by Frances Allen and her husband John, a Richmond tobacco merchant. Poe later lived in Baltimore with his aunt, Maria Clemm and her daughter Virginia, whom he eventually married. The trio formed a household which moved to New York and then to Philadelphia, where they lived for about six years -- apparently the happiest, most productive years of his life. Of Poe's several Philadelphia homes, only this one survives. In 1844 they moved to New York, wh ...
    Related: boston, edgar, edgar allen, pulitzer prize, tale heart
  • Carl Sandburg - 1,704 words
    ... o home. Final Draft Carl Sandburg (1878-1967), was an American poet, biographer, and balladeer. He was a writer, famous for his free-verse style (Carl Sandburg, 222). He focused on the people and places of modern American life. Sandburg wrote what is regarded as the definitive biography of Abraham Lincoln. He was even invited to address the joint session and to be honored, when the houses of Congress came together on Feb. 12, 1959, to celebrate the 150th anniversary of the birth of Lincoln. Sandburg was well known as a lecturer and singer (Carl Sandburg, 392). His craggy voice along with his guitar made him a great performer of folk songs. The two most impressive things about Carl Sandbu ...
    Related: carl, carl sandburg, sandburg, public school, social democratic party
  • Carl Sandburg - 1,717 words
    Carl Sandburg As a child of an immigrant couple, Carl Sandburg was barely American himself, yet the life, which he had lived, has defined key aspects of our great country, and touched the hearts and minds of her people. Sandburg grew up in the American Midwest, yet spent the majority of his life traveling throughout the states. The country, which would define his style of poetry and his views of society, government, and culture, would equally be defined by his writing, lecturing, and the American dream he lived: The dream of becoming successful with only an idea and the will to use it. Historically, Sandburg's most defining poetic element is his free verse style. His open views towards Ameri ...
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  • Chinese Prostitutes In 1900s - 1,248 words
    Chinese Prostitutes In 1900'S In California, between 1850's to the Chinese Exclusion Act, most of the Chinese women who came to San Francisco were either slaves or indentured. They were often lured, kidnapped or purchased and forced to work as prostitutes at the brothels which is run by secret society of the Tongs of San Francisco. Chinese prostitutes also were smuggled and had worked at the Chinatown brothels in the Comstock Mines in Nevada. Chinese prostitutes were commonly known as prostitutes of the lowest order. "Both outcast slatterns and Asian slaves stood at the edge of the irregular marketplace, far more socially stigmatized than ordinary prostitutes." The demand for Chinese prostit ...
    Related: chinese, chinese exclusion, chinese exclusion act, chinese women, spanish-american war
  • Colonial Exchange During The Age Of Discovery The Voyages Of The Iberians Marked History The Discovery Of The New World Meant - 1,044 words
    Colonial Exchange during the Age of Discovery The voyages of the Iberians marked history. The discovery of the new world meant the unification of two old worlds. These old worlds had different beliefs, attitudes, language, and values. The culture of these two worlds would never be the same. The native peoples of America at the end of the fifteenth century ranged from the simplest hunting-fishing-gathering societies to highly developed civilizations with urban and peasant components. In spite of these notable differences, they were alike in that they had all developed from the level of pre-bow-arrow hunters without significant contact with other regions. There high civilizations were based on ...
    Related: colonial, cultural history, discovery, history, iberian peninsula
  • Cuban History - 1,431 words
    Cuban History History of Cuba Christopher Columbus landed on the island of Cuba on October 28, 1492, during his initial westward voyage. In honor of the daughter of Ferdinand V and Isabella I of Spain, his benefactors, Columbus named it Juana, the first of several names he successively applied to the island. It eventually became known as Cuba, from its aboriginal name, Cubanascnan. Colonization by Spain When Columbus first landed on Cuba it was inhabited by the Ciboney, a friendly tribe related to the Arawak. Colonization of the island began in 1511, when the Spanish soldier Diego Velzquez established the town of Baracoa. Velzquez subsequently founded several other settlements, including San ...
    Related: cuban, cuban government, cuban revolution, history, liberal party
  • Cubas Politics - 1,690 words
    Cuba`s Politics While the isle of Cuba was initially discovered on October 27, 1492 during one of Columbus first voyages, it wasnt actually claimed by Spain until the sixteenth century. However, its tumultuous beginnings as a Spanish sugar colony provides an insightful backdrop into the very essence of the countrys political and economic unrest. From its early revolutionary days to the insurrectional challenge of the Marxist-Leninist theories emerged the totalitarian regime under Fidel Castro in present day Cuba. Cuban colonial society was distinguished by the characteristics of colonial societies in general, namely a stratified, inegalitarian class system; a poorly differentiated agricultur ...
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  • During The 1500s To 1800s, The Strength And Stature Of A - 1,618 words
    During the 1500's to 1800's, the strength and stature of a country depended upon its political power, which can be traced to how self-sufficient it was. Striving to be self-sufficient was what nations sought after; dependency was not a characteristic of a powerful nation. Raw materials were the most required item to strengthen the central government, and deter interactions, such as trade with other nations. The first country to introduce mercantilism in America was Spain. The spanish american colonies were not allowed to trade directly with Europe. Instead they had to funnel all of the sugar and tobacco, two common commdities of the new land, through Spain. When this was done, heavy custom d ...
    Related: stature, english speaking, spanish colonies, taxation without representation, english-speaking
  • Entrance Into The American Legion - 1,598 words
    Entrance Into The American Legion Instructor: XXXXXXXX College Writing 16 June 2000 The American Legion: A Right To Membership Introduction The United States Congress chartered the American Legion in 1919. Its purpose was to benefit veterans and their families, promote Americanism and serve the greater good of communities nationwide. First welcomed to membership were veterans returning home from the battlefields of Europe. But over the years, Congress amended the Legion's charter so as to include those who had served in World War II, Korea and more recent conflicts. Ineligible for American Legion membership, however, remain the many men and women who had answered our nation's call while Amer ...
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  • For Whom The Bell Tolls - 1,137 words
    For Whom The Bell Tolls For Whom the Bell Tolls is a novel loosely based on Ernest Hemingway's own experiences in the Spanish Civil War in the 1930's. Before I delve into the book itself, I thought it would be best to give some background information on Ernest Hemingway and on the Spanish Civil war and the circumstances surrounding it. Hemingway was born July 21, 1899 in Oak Park, Illinois, and the second of six children. His father, Clarence Hemingway, was a physician and his mother was a devoutly religious woman with a talent for music. When he was young, Ernest acquired the nickname champ, which he relished and felt it showed his rowdy, hard-nosed outdoor sense of adventure. He had garner ...
    Related: bell, bell tolls, for whom the bell tolls, world war i, world war ii
  • For Whom The Bell Tolls By Ernes Hemmingway - 991 words
    For Whom The Bell Tolls by Ernes Hemmingway The novel For Whom the Bell Tolls is based on Ernest Hemmingway's own experiences in the Spanish Civil War in the 1930's. This novel depicts how irony and love get in the way of a war and how devastating these affects can be. Ernest Hemmingway was born on July 21, 1899 in Oak Park, Illinois, and the second of six children. Clarence Hemmingway, his father, was a physician and his mother was a religious woman with a talent for music. When he was young he got the nickname "champ" which he felt it showed his rowdy outdoor sense of adventure. His father loved to hunt so in that he took on that love for hunting and did it often in upper Michigan. When he ...
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  • Hawaii By James Michener - 2,131 words
    ... ey to the New Orleans, Colorado, and Nebraska sugar tycoons. Pretty soon they would all be bankrupt. The McKinley Tariff protected the United States sugar producers by penalizing those who imported Hawaiian sugar, and subsidized those who sold American sugar. So Whip and the eight others devised a plan to begin a revolution, seize control of the government, and turn the islands over to the United States. Queen Liliuokalani was the new queen, succeeding her brother after he died. She wished that the non-Hawaiian enterprises would leave; this included Whip and his companions. The coalition planned to begin a revolution, with the help of their friend and relative Micah Hale - a minister. Th ...
    Related: hawaii, point of view, armed forces, social class, sank
  • Hawaiian Overthrow - 1,268 words
    ... nnexation of the Hawaiian Kingdom was mostly her fault. She isolated several groups of people and made them feel that and overthrow was the only way out. Even people who had been staunch monarchists through the whole process started to dislike the way she was running the kingdom. One of the most outspoken adversaries of Liliuokalani was J.L. Kaulukou, who one time was a strong royalist and even gave her the name onipaa which means steadfast. Liliuokalani even adopted that as her personal motto and it is widely used today by sovereignty activists . He was the appointed Marshall of the Hawaiian Kingdom, from 1884-1888, and he said in 1898: I regard annexation as the best thing that could h ...
    Related: hawaiian, hawaiian islands, overthrow, world power, states government
  • History Of America - 971 words
    History Of America In studying the history of Americas development from a colonial nation to the modern world power of today, it is necessary to pay special attention to the several major wars the United States was involved in. These wars varied in severity ranging from minor skirmishes such as the Spanish American war, to more costly conflicts. Costly in terms of money and loss of life, the Civil War, Vietnam, and both World Wars left lasting impressions on the people who endured them. These wars often defined entire generations of Americans. More often than not, everyone alive in each of these major campaigns was somehow affected in the war. Some served in the military, some worked in the ...
    Related: america, history, saving private ryan, spanish-american war, neutrality
  • Jamie Katzaman April 10, 1996 Columbus And The New World Christianity In The New World The Catholic Church During The Middle - 1,416 words
    Jamie Katzaman April 10, 1996 Columbus and the New World CHRISTIANITY IN THE NEW WORLD The Catholic Church during the Middle Ages played an all encompassing role over the lives of the people and the government. As the Dark Ages came to a close the ideas of the Renaissance started to take hold, and the church's power gradually began to wain. The monarchies of Europe also began to grow replacing the church's power. Monarchies, at the close of the Middle Ages and the dawn of the Renaissance, did not so much seek the guidance of the church as much as it sought their approval. However, the Church during the Age of Discovery was still a major influence. The discovery of the New World and its prev ...
    Related: catholic, catholic church, catholic faith, christianity, christopher columbus, columbus, jamie
  • Monroe Doctrine - 1,566 words
    Monroe Doctrine The Monroe Doctrine can be considered as the United States first major declaration to the world as a fairly new nation. The Monroe Doctrine was a statement of United States policy on the activity and rights of powers in the Western Hemisphere during the early to mid 1800s. The doctrine established the United States position in the major world affairs of the time. Around the time of the Napoleonic Wars in the 1820s, Mexico, Argentina, Chile and Colombia all gained their independence from Spanish control ("Monroe Doctrine" 617). The United States was the first nation to recognize their independence from Spain. The European powers had still considered the new nations as still be ...
    Related: doctrine, james monroe, monroe, monroe doctrine, president james monroe, president monroe
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