Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: spaniards

  • 104 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • >>>
  • When The Spaniards Came To Settle The New World, Or What Is - 554 words
    When the Spaniards came to settle the New World, or what is now Mexico and Peru, they imposed many new ways and customs for the people living there. These institutions were partially what the Spaniards were used to from living in Spain, and others were simply to live better. The Spaniards imposed many political, economical, and social institutions in the New World never heard of before by the Indians, and many feudal customs and systems that they brought wholly intact from Spain. The political institutions were very important for government functionality in the Spanish colonies. First, a class system similar to that in Spain was reconstructed anew in the colonies. Those in the New World that ...
    Related: settle, spaniards, social institutions, spanish crown, king's
  • A Victim Of The Double Rape - 1,601 words
    A Victim of the Double Rape There is an old saying that goes "behind every strong man is a strong woman". This proverb can be used to describe the legacy of Hernando Cortes and his conquest of Mexico. Like the proverb, he had someone behind him who aided in his goals of dominance. The woman was Dona Marina, otherwise known as La Malinche. Her beauty and intelligence made her into one of the most hated and influential women in Mexico's history. According to Clifford Krauss, "La Malinche is for the most part portrayed as the perpetrator of Mexico's original sin" (110). La Malinche was a victim of a "double rape" (Todorov 49). Her destiny was determined at birth. As a child growing up in native ...
    Related: double, rape, spanish culture, female sexuality, refer
  • Aaron Burr Treason Trial - 1,399 words
    Aaron Burr Treason Trial The early 1800's were an unusual time in the history of the United States. A country in its infancy, growing, turbulent, and filled with intrigue where political and economic fortunes were made and lost overnight. While the country was founded on noble ideas---and no doubt these powerful ideas were taken seriously---how such ideas were to be put into practice created fertile ground for personal ambition and interest to be a stronger motivator than the "common good". In fact, at times it appears that the ideas were little more than vehicles for the personal ambitions---and in the case of this story---the personal vendettas of powerful personalities. Aaron Burr, brilli ...
    Related: aaron, aaron burr, burr, treason, trial
  • Amistad - 298 words
    Amistad The Portuguese abducted a group of Africans, and shipped them to Havana, Cuba. The Africans were then purchased by two Spanish men and put aboard the schooner Amistad for a voyage to Principe. The Africans seized the ship, killed two of the crew, and ordered the schooner to be navigated for the coast of Africa. The remaining crew altered their course and steered for the American shore. In August of 1839, the Amistad was seized off Long Island, NY, by the U.S. brig Washington. The Spaniards were freed and the Africans were imprisoned in New Haven and Hartford Connecticut. The Spanish men claimed the Africans as their property and others claimed that they saved the schooner Amistad and ...
    Related: amistad, men and women, long island, court decision, spain
  • Analysis Of An Aztec Encounter - 1,133 words
    Analysis of an Aztec Encounter Analysis of an Aztec Encounter The Spaniard and Aztec civilizations were two completely different worlds whose fated encounter caused some surprising reactions from both parties. Neither of these nations knew exactly what to expect or how to react to each others behaviors. Differences in religion, customs and weaponry became the deciding factors of who would be the dominant aggressor in these encounters. Even though both parties were unsure of what to expect, the Spaniards had already set a goal for themselves before they set foot in Mexico. They wanted to conquer the other nation and exploit them for anything of value. The climax of the Aztec Empire and the co ...
    Related: aztec, aztec empire, aztec religion, encounter, indigenous people
  • Are These Not Also Men - 718 words
    Are These Not Also Men? "Are These Not Also Men?" In 1511, Fray Antonio Montesinos spoke the words, "Are these not also men?" His famous quote was a response to the mistreatment of the indigenous peoples that inhabited the Americas, by the conquering Spanish. Immediately upon discovering and colonizing the New World a widespread debate arose in regards to the usage and treatment of the native Indians. This debate was primarily focused on how to classify the Indians. Many people believed that the Indians were not human at all and should be allowed to be treated merely as slaves. The opposing side, the church, argued back that the Indians, no matter how seemingly uncivilized they lived, were h ...
    Related: spanish conquerors, pope paul, point of view, seemingly, opposing
  • Arts Of The Contact Zone By Pratt - 1,104 words
    Arts Of The Contact Zone By Pratt In "Arts of the Contact Zone," Mary Louise Pratt introduces a term very unfamiliar to many people. This term, autoethnography, means the way in which subordinate peoples present themselves in ways that their dominants have represented them. Therefore, autoethnography is not self-representation, but a collaboration of mixed ideas and values form both the dominant and subordinate cultures. They are meant to address the speaker's own community as well as the conqueror's. Pratt provides many examples of autoethnography throughout her piece, including two texts by Guaman Poma and her son, Manuel. Although very different in setting, ideas, and time periods, they a ...
    Related: arts, pratt, zone, the intended, grammar school
  • Aztec Empire History - 1,498 words
    Aztec Empire History The Aztec Empire History The center of the Aztec civilization was the Valley of Mexico, a huge,oval basin about 7,500 feet above sea level. The Aztecs were formed afterthe Toltec civilization occurred when hundreds of civilians came towards Lake Texcoco. In the swamplands there was only one piece of land to farm on and it was totally surrounded by more marshes. The Aztec families somehow converted these disadvantages to a mighty empire known as the Aztec Empire. People say the empire was partially formed by a deeply believed legend. As the legend went, it said that Aztec people would create an empire in a swampy place where they would see an eagle eating a snake, while p ...
    Related: aztec, aztec civilization, aztec empire, aztec religion, empire, history
  • Aztecs - 1,637 words
    Aztecs The Aztec Empire was a Native American state that ruled much of what is now Mexico from about 1427 until 1521, when the empire was conquered by the Spaniards. The empire represented the highest point in the development of the rich Aztec civilization that had begun more than a century earlier. At the height of their power, the Aztec controlled a region stretching from the Valley of Mexico in central Mexico east to the Gulf of Mexico and south to Guatemala. The Aztec built great cities and developed a complex social, political, and religious structure. Their capital, Tenochitlan, was located on the site of present-day Mexico City. An elaborate city built on islands and marsh land, Tenoc ...
    Related: aztec civilization, aztec empire, aztec gods, aztecs, city states
  • Aztecs - 1,657 words
    ... The land around the lakes was fertile but not large enough to produce food for the population, which expanded steadily as the empire grew. To make more land suitable for farming, the Aztec developed irrigation systems, formed terraces on hillsides, and used fertilizer to enrich the soil. Their most important agricultural technique, however, was to reclaim swampy land around the lakes by creating chinampas, or artificial islands that are known popularly as floating gardens. To make the chinampas, the Aztec dug canals through the marshy shores and islands, then heaped the mud on huge mats made of woven reeds. They anchored the mats by tying them to posts driven into the lake bed and plant ...
    Related: aztec empire, aztecs, mexico city, spanish conquest, gulf
  • Business Overseas - 955 words
    Business Overseas Spain Geography & Location Spain is the second largest country in the EU. The territory of Spain covers most of the Iberian Peninsula; which it shares with Portugal and also includes the Balearic Islands in the Mediterranean, the Canary Islands in the Atlantic Ocean, and the North African cities of Ceuta and Melilla. In the north it is bordered by the Cantabrian Sea, France and Andorra; in the east and south-east by the Mediterranean; in the south by the Straits of Gibraltar; in the south-east by the Atlantic; in the west by Portugal and in the north-east by the Atlantic. Climate The temperate in Spain is clear, hot summers in the interior, more moderate and cloudy along th ...
    Related: overseas, time zone, atlantic ocean, natural hazards, factbook
  • Charles V - 2,540 words
    Charles V Emperor Charles V (CHARLES I, King of SPAIN). Born at Ghent, 1500; died at Yuste, in Spain, 1558; was a descendant of the house of Hapsburg, and to this descent owed his sovereignty over so many lands that it was said of him that the sun never set on his dominions. Charles was the son of Philip, Duke of Burgundy, by Joanna, daughter of Ferdinand and Isabella, and Burgundy was the first heritage to which he at his led, on his fathers death in 1506. As he was a minor at that time, his aunt, Margaret of Austria, undertook the regency for him. William of Chivres, his father's chief counsellor, had charge of the prince's household; Adrian of Utrecht, the Humanist and professor of theolo ...
    Related: charles i, charles v, police system, political power, siege
  • Chiapas Revolution - 500 words
    Chiapas Revolution 1994 proved to be radical year in Mexican history. There were three major assassinations of political figures, President Carlos Salinas signed the NAFTA agreement, and a small revolution began in the Pacific Southwest of Mexico. Although all of these a major impact on Mexican society none played out to the public greater then Zapatista uprising in Chiapas. Several hours before 1994 became the New Year the Mexican state of Chiapas was thrust upon the international scene as the Zapatista guerilla army seized control of the city of San Cristbal de las Casas and five towns in the surrounding Chiapas mountain region. The guerillas were bands of ethnic Mayan Indian peasants from ...
    Related: chiapas, native people, mexican state, political issues, racism
  • Christopher Columbus - 1,172 words
    Christopher Columbus In 1451, a boy named Christopher Columbus (See Appendix A), who was born in Genoa, became a sailor and discoverer of a new continent. He spoke Castilian with a little Portuguese. Although he received little education, he worked with his father, who was a weaver and had a wine shop. During Columbus' youth, he sailed in between his looming duties, shipping and receiving wool and wine for his father. When Columbus was in his twenties, he joined other exporting fleets, traveling around Spain, to England, Portugal, the Mediterranean Sea, and to West Africa (see Appendix B). In his youth he wanted to find easier ways to trade. Columbus thought of reaching Asia by sailing West. ...
    Related: christopher, christopher columbus, columbus, west africa, mediterranean sea
  • Christopher Columbus - 1,124 words
    ... t find the trade route so Columbus wanted to get wealth from creating a gold mine on the islands, and by selling slaves. Only a small amount of gold was remitted to Spain, and didn't repay much. The slave trade drew little wealth, nor support from the monarchs and citizens of Spain. The attempt to bring wealth to Spain was not accomplished. The! entire expedition made by Columbus was an economic failure which put a hole in Spain's poor economy which was made up of 98% poor peasants. Columbus established colonies in the islands which would be settled, and be founded as a mining and farming colonies that would produce their own food and create a profit by remitting gold to Spain. These col ...
    Related: christopher, christopher columbus, columbus, holy trinity, primary sources
  • Colombia - 642 words
    Colombia COLOMBIA GEOGRAPHY: Colombia stretches over approximately 1,140,000 sq. km, roughly equal to the area of Portugal, Spain, and France put together. Colombia occupies the northwestern end of South America, and is the only country there with coasts on both the Pacific (1350 km long), and the Atlantic (over 1600 km.) Three Andean ranges run north and south through the western half of the country (about 45% of the total territory.) The eastern part is a vast lowland which can be generally divided into two regions: a huge open savannah on the north, and the amazon in the south (400,000 sq. km approx.).Colombia is a country of geographical contrasts and extremes. As well as the features me ...
    Related: colombia, colonial period, national library, civil war, library
  • Colonial Exchange During The Age Of Discovery The Voyages Of The Iberians Marked History The Discovery Of The New World Meant - 1,044 words
    Colonial Exchange during the Age of Discovery The voyages of the Iberians marked history. The discovery of the new world meant the unification of two old worlds. These old worlds had different beliefs, attitudes, language, and values. The culture of these two worlds would never be the same. The native peoples of America at the end of the fifteenth century ranged from the simplest hunting-fishing-gathering societies to highly developed civilizations with urban and peasant components. In spite of these notable differences, they were alike in that they had all developed from the level of pre-bow-arrow hunters without significant contact with other regions. There high civilizations were based on ...
    Related: colonial, cultural history, discovery, history, iberian peninsula
  • Columbus, The Indians, And The Human Progress - 660 words
    Columbus, The Indians, And The Human Progress Spain, being recently unified, wanted spices and gold. The gold to them could purchase anything. So they offered Christopher Columbus ten percent of the profit, if he would bring back gold and spices. Christopher Columbus was sent to Asia with three ships: the Nina, the Pinta, and the Santa Maria. Columbus sailed for thirty-three days not sighting land. It wasn't until early October of 1492 that he and his crew finally landed. He supposedly was the first to sight land and received a ten thousand maravedis as his reward. It was not him, but a member of his crew who first sighted land, Rodrigo. But Columbus got the credit. As Columbus and his crew ...
    Related: human race, christopher columbus, santa maria, main point, credit
  • Conquest Of Paradise - 924 words
    Conquest Of Paradise 1492, Conquest of Paradise: The misrepresentation of the Film The movie, Conquest of Paradise is very inaccurate in its portrayal of Christopher Columbus and what he brought to the so called "New World". The movie shows Columbus to be the first person to discover America and to cross the Atlantic Ocean when it is known that others had accomplished this miracle years before he did. Also, the movie doesn't completely show the difficulty of the first voyage and the fears of the never reaching land after losing wind. Third, the movie shows the Spaniards and the Natives getting along peacefully and as one when in actuality the Natives were very unfairly mistreated. Lastly, th ...
    Related: conquest, paradise, first person, old world, wind
  • Cowboys - 731 words
    Cowboys Cowboys How they started Cattle ranchers began to move out onto the Great Plains in the mid 1800s In the late 1800s cowboys became popular in the cattle industry. The American cowboys owe their knowledge of how to tame the cattle to vaquerars (the Mexican cowboys). The animals originally were from the ranches in southern Texas formerly operated by Spaniards and Mexicans. The cowboys often called the wild cattle longhorns, which were the huge herds of wild cattle. About one- third of the cowboys were free black men who had moved west after the Civil War. Each year Texas ranches would collect huge herds of cattle and start them northward on what was called the long drive. The cowboys w ...
    Related: brace jovanovich, drinking water, american nation, brown, bacon
  • 104 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • >>>