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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: space travel

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  • 2001: A Space Odyssey - 1,255 words
    2001: A Space Odyssey The concept of space travel has been an interest to many since the beginning of time. Today, scientists are moving at a comfortable pace to expand our vast knowledge of the universe. Many authors dreamed of the possibilities while scientists tried to bring them to reality. The book "2001: A Space Odyssey," written by Arthur C. Clarke in the 1960's, proposed ideas about advanced space travel that took place in a time period only two years from now; however, at the current rate of the space program, mankind is nowhere near the technology showed by the book. Clarke uses concepts of space travel that can still only be dreamed of today. Clarke, an author of the sixties, had ...
    Related: odyssey, outer space, space odyssey, space program, space shuttle, space technology, space travel
  • Against Ufos - 809 words
    Against Ufos UFOs: Neither Here nor There Throughout the past, the existence of unidentified flying objects and aliens has been disputed over and over. Many different platforms and viewpoints have been taken in order to support the respective sides of the issue. The main argument against intelligent life existing somewhere other than Earth is that of where they derive. The truth of the matter is there is no place in the universe that UFOs and aliens could exist. Skeptics are faced with the fact that modern science has stated that no other orbital body in our solar system or immediate surrounding area is able to sustain life (Blum, 1990). Our solar system is a collection of planets, comets, a ...
    Related: ufos, solar system, great leap, modern science, astronomy
  • An Indepth Look At Hg Wells - 1,395 words
    An Indepth Look At H.G. Wells Herbert George Wells was born on September 21, 1866 in Bromley, England, the last of four children. His mother was a house cleaner and his father was a shopkeeper. When he was eight years old, he broke his leg, spent a lot of time reading, and discovered an intense interest in books. At the age of thirteen, his father was injured in an accident so Wells had to leave school and work for a draper. He hated this work and managed to change his employment by working for his uncle and becoming a part-time tutor. This gave him the opportunity to continue his studies in his free time. He finally won a scholarship to The Normal School of Science in London. He worked as a ...
    Related: h. g. wells, jules verne, world war i, modern science, novelist
  • Artificial Intelligence - 1,339 words
    ... , typically use Boolean logic to process input from an individual user and employs stored rules to generate a prediction or suggestion. A prime example of this usage is the "Office Assistant" which is included with Microsoft's Office 97 software package. This assistant is extremely useful for the individual who is unfamiliar with the software package. If the user seems to be floundering around looking for a way to accomplish a task, the assistant will attempt to interpret the desires of the user by looking at what he as been doing and then tries to make an educated guess as to what he wants to do. Then the assistant will display a help menu to guide the user through the desired course of ...
    Related: artificial, artificial intelligence, intelligence, american express, knowledge base
  • Black Holes As Future Power Plants - 1,996 words
    Black Holes As Future Power Plants Black Holes: The Power Source for Future Space Travel? Ryan Weaver University of Alaska Anchorage Everyone knows that the spaceships in Star Trek that travel faster than the speed of light are mere science fiction. According to Einstein's theory of relativity, if an object reached the speed of light, its mass would be immediately transformed into energy. Currently our spaceships can not even reach mars in less than five years. Now, with modern theories of black holes, trips to other solar systems may be possible at nearly the speed of light. Black holes were only proven to exist within the last twenty-five years and were only really considered to exist for ...
    Related: black hole, black holes, nuclear power, power plants, power supply
  • Charles Lindenburgh - 1,067 words
    Charles Lindenburgh Charles Lindbergh One of the greatest heroes the world has ever known Charles Augustus Lindbergh. He is most famous for his transatlantic flight from New York to Paris. Lindbergh acquired great fame for doing good will tours in Latin America. Other than politicians and war heroes no one has yet quite matched his fame. He was a genus when it came to aviation and mechanics. He advised the making and design of several planes from ones made of wood and wire to supersonic jets. He helped several countries and airlines by giving them advise on their air fleets. He wrote several documents of his journeys and of his life. Charles Lindbergh entered this world on February 4, 1902 i ...
    Related: charles lindbergh, early development, doing good, chicago illinois, flying
  • Comparison Of Herberts Dune And Asimovs Foundation Series: Effects Of - 1,705 words
    Comparison of Herbert's "Dune" and Asimov's "Foundation Series": Effects of Technology and Belief Systems on the Individual Technology and belief have a great deal to do in making a good science fiction novel. Frank Herbert's Dune and Isaac Asimov's Foundation series give excellent examples of this. Belief systems are defined as religious beliefs in a society. Technology is defined as the level of science achieved in a society. These two factors play separate roles in a society. Yet, at times, they fall into the same categories like in the book Dune where science reflects religious aspects or in Foundation where the society depends on religion and social behavior to survive the onslaught of ...
    Related: comparison, dune, isaac asimov, the bible, good life
  • Extraterrestrial Civilizations - 1,082 words
    Extra-Terrestrial Civilizations Introduction Ever wondered what lies beyond our own Solar System, beyond our furthest planet Pluto, beyond what our most powerful telescopes can project. With the latest in Technology and Sciences, we (The Human Race) have only chipped off a flake of the great Pillar of Technology and Civilization. The question is: Are we alone? Are human beings the only possessors of eyes that search the night sky for new galaxies. The only builders of devices that extend the natural senses. The only owners of minds that think and derive the meanings of everything around them? And the answer is just possibly: We are not alone! There are others that see, touch, feel, smell, an ...
    Related: extraterrestrial, extraterrestrial life, greenhouse effect, publishing company, underwater
  • Extraterrestrials - 1,264 words
    ... ravels in a year equal to 9 X 4605 million million kilometres. In accordance with Albert Einstein's relativity theories a speed of light traveling starship would require an infinite amount of energy. Even a ship travelling at 99.99% the speed of light, 186,000 miles per second, would require just as large an amount of energy, almost infinite. Regardless of these scientific restrictions to space travel of enormous distances some evidence suggest the occurrence of out of this world experiences that cannot be explained. Alien abductions as well as U.F.O sightings are among the most known evidence of human contact with extraterrestrials. Although most abduction stories or UFO stories are pro ...
    Related: ancient chinese, united states military, albert einstein, gray, philosophical
  • Film Contributions Of The Sixties - 1,630 words
    Film Contributions Of The Sixties Beginning roughly with the release of Stanley Kubrick's Dr. Strangelove: Or How I Stopped Worrying and Loved the Bomb in 1964, and continuing for about the next decade, the "Sixties" era of filmmaking made many lasting impressions on the motion picture industry. Although editing and pacing styles varied greatly from Martin Scorcesse's hyperactive pace, to Kubrick's slow methodical pace, there were many uniform contributions made by some of the era's seminal directors. In particular, the "Sixties" saw the return of the auteur, as people like Francis Ford Coppola and Stanley Kubrick wrote and directed their own screenplays, while Woody Allen wrote, directed an ...
    Related: film, sixties, space odyssey, short history, lenses
  • Genetic Engineering - 1,130 words
    ... precautions are in effect in order to save the lives of unborn babies. Gene therapy cannot be used on humans until it is perfected and there is little or no chance of failure. These sciences are not perfect but give it a few years and it will be a great benefit to the human race. It is not safe to clone a human. It took 277 tries to successfully clone Dolly the sheep. This should not stop scientists from trying to clone organs that could save many lives. Currently three states banned the cloning of humans. Among the states are Michigan, Rhode Island, and California. The state banns will stay in effect for five years in California and Rhode Island. Currently there are three years and eig ...
    Related: engineering, genetic, genetic engineering, nucleic acids, safety regulations
  • Journey To Center Of The Earth - 668 words
    Journey To Center Of The Earth In the novel, A Journey to the Center of the Earth, author Jules Verne tells the fictitious story of three men and their adventures as they descend into the depths of the earth. The leading character in this expedition is a fifty-year-old German professor named Hardwigg. He is an uncle to the narrator, Henry (Harry), a simple Englishman. The other man is Hans, a serene Icelandic guide. Professor Hardwigg finds a piece of parchment that written in Runic in a book. Harry finds out before his uncle that it says there is a way to get into the center of the earth through a mountain (Mt. Sneffels) in Iceland. Harry is reluctant to tell his uncle the message because h ...
    Related: journey to the center of the earth, human beings, jules verne, the narrator, harry
  • Kurt Vonnegut: A Canary In A Coal Mine - 1,197 words
    Kurt Vonnegut: A Canary in a Coal Mine Kurt Vonnegut Served as a sensitive cell in the organism of American Society during the 1960's. His work alerted the public about the absurdity of modern warfare and an increasingly mechanized and impersonal society in which humans were essentially worthless and degenerated. The satirical tone and sardonic humor allowed people to read his works and laugh at their own misfortune. Vonnegut was born on November 11, 1922, in Indianapolis, where he was reared. His father was an architect, as his grandfather had been. Though the family's fortune was eroded during the Depression-his father went without an architectural commission from 1929 to 1940-they were we ...
    Related: coal, kurt, kurt vonnegut, mine, mark twain
  • Kurt Vonnegut: A Canary In A Coal Mine - 1,197 words
    Kurt Vonnegut: A Canary in a Coal Mine Kurt Vonnegut Served as a sensitive cell in the organism of American Society during the 1960's. His work alerted the public about the absurdity of modern warfare and an increasingly mechanized and impersonal society in which humans were essentially worthless and degenerated. The satirical tone and sardonic humor allowed people to read his works and laugh at their own misfortune. Vonnegut was born on November 11, 1922, in Indianapolis, where he was reared. His father was an architect, as his grandfather had been. Though the family's fortune was eroded during the Depression-his father went without an architectural commission from 1929 to 1940-they were we ...
    Related: coal, kurt, kurt vonnegut, mine, public relations
  • Kurt Vonnegut: A Canary In A Coal Mine - 1,197 words
    Kurt Vonnegut: A Canary in a Coal Mine Kurt Vonnegut Served as a sensitive cell in the organism of American Society during the 1960's. His work alerted the public about the absurdity of modern warfare and an increasingly mechanized and impersonal society in which humans were essentially worthless and degenerated. The satirical tone and sardonic humor allowed people to read his works and laugh at their own misfortune. Vonnegut was born on November 11, 1922, in Indianapolis, where he was reared. His father was an architect, as his grandfather had been. Though the family's fortune was eroded during the Depression-his father went without an architectural commission from 1929 to 1940-they were we ...
    Related: coal, kurt, kurt vonnegut, mine, george orwell
  • Men On The Moon The Apollo Story - 1,453 words
    Men On The Moon The Apollo Story For years, man has looked up at the stars and wondered, what power they possessed or from what great God were they born? The answer to this question has always been a dream to man, but the dream is getting closer to reality. Space travel in the 1960s was become a reality, but man went farther with his expectations. Man now wanted to land and walk on the the only one of Earths natural satellites know as the Moon. The splashdown May 26, 1969, of Apollo 10 cleared the way for the first formal attempt at a manned lunar landing.1 The 363-foot-tall Apollo 11 space vehicle was launched from Pad A, Launch Complex 39, Kennedy Space Center, at 9:37 a.m., July 16, 1969. ...
    Related: apollo, moon, primary goal, panama canal, returning
  • Modern Science And Materialism - 1,924 words
    Modern Science And Materialism What is real? This question has puzzled many what is really real or what is reality. Reality as I shall explain is one that is according to materialism and proven by science. Materialism is defined, as the metaphysical view holding that matter alone is real. This is what Hugh Elliot proves in his argument Modern Science and Materialism. By use of his argument I will answer the questions of what is real, what humans need to know, if it is possible to know what is real and how, how to distinguish real for non-real, where humans fit in, and how we can benefit from materialism. First, what is real? Reality is only one thing, and it is all principles of matter and e ...
    Related: materialism, modern science, science, human actions, human knowledge
  • Nicholas Coppernicus - 571 words
    Nicholas Coppernicus Nicolaus Copernicus was a Polish astronomer, best known for the astronomical theory that the sun is stationary and Earth, spinning on its axis once daily, revolves around the sun annually. He was very intelligent and was educated at various universities. If Copernicus hadnt challenged Pltolmys theory, it would have affected us in many ways. Space travel, satellites, and weather prediction would not be as advanced. Nicolaus Copernicus was born on February 19, 1473 in Torun, Poland (Wood 87). He was born into a family of merchants. Copernicus uncle, Bishop Lukasz Watzerode, made sure his nephew obtained a solid education. In 1491 Copernicus enrolled in Jagiellonian Univers ...
    Related: nicholas, space technology, canon law, space travel, spinning
  • Pink Floyd: The First Band In Outer Space - 1,595 words
    Pink Floyd: The First Band In Outer Space For many people, the group Pink Floyd is considered as un-popular, aged, and without any sense in today's modern society. It's so unfortunate that true rock and roll music is being left behind for the new head-splitting garbage that infests the airwaves today. The newest generation is unaware of the history behind all the "music" they listen to now. Where did it all begin? Who first wandered into the realms of psychedelic music to create a style and a culture that would last for decades, and never be copied? The answer of course is Pink Floyd Pink Floyd was the first band in outer space. Since the mid-'60s, their music has relentlessly tinkered with ...
    Related: band, outer, outer space, pink, pink floyd, space travel
  • Radio: Making Waves In America - 1,446 words
    Radio: Making Waves In America Radio-wave technology is one of the most important technologies used by man. It has forever changed the United States and the world, and will continue to do so in the future. Radio has been a communications medium, a recreational device, and many other things to us. When British physicist James Clerk Maxwell published his theory of electromagnetic waves in 1873, he probably never could have envisioned the sorts of things that would come of such a principle. His theory mainly had to do with light waves, but fifteen years later, a German physicist named Heinrich Hertz was able to electrically generate Maxwells rays in his lab. The discovery of these amazing prope ...
    Related: america, information service, san jose, global positioning system, pittsburgh
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