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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: space shuttle

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  • What Was The Effect Of The Space Shuttle Challenger - 1,348 words
    What Was The Effect of The Space Shuttle Challenger Disaster on NASA and the Future of the United States Space Program? This was the major question proposed during the late 1980's. What was the future of NASA going to be after this terrible disaster? Would there be enough funding for the continuation of the United States Space Program? This Challenger explosion was one of the major catastrophes of the entire Space Program since the beginning of funding for the Space Program was started. It seems, out of all the mistakes that NASA and the United States government has ever made, this one made a lasting impression on many Americans, and foreign authority figures all over the world. The Space Sh ...
    Related: challenger, kennedy space center, shuttle, shuttle challenger, space program, space shuttle
  • What Was The Effect Of The Space Shuttle Challenger - 1,375 words
    ... n cause of the explosion was the O- ring which was vital to the Space Shuttles. When the O-ring failed, it seals in the sub-zero temperatures to which the Shuttles stack was exposed to. (Shuttle Challenger, 50.) Accompanying the temperatures, the hydrogen mixed with that causing the explosion which killed all 7 crew member aboard. Contrary to what people had originally thought, there were no human errors to be found in the transcripts. According to the transmission between Commander Scobbe and the Houston and Kennedy Space Center technicians, everything was fine in terms of communications, and the "...go with throttle up" (as described in the transcript of the communications) was a "norm ...
    Related: challenger, kennedy space center, shuttle, shuttle challenger, shuttle columbia, space exploration, space program
  • 2001: A Space Odyssey - 1,255 words
    2001: A Space Odyssey The concept of space travel has been an interest to many since the beginning of time. Today, scientists are moving at a comfortable pace to expand our vast knowledge of the universe. Many authors dreamed of the possibilities while scientists tried to bring them to reality. The book "2001: A Space Odyssey," written by Arthur C. Clarke in the 1960's, proposed ideas about advanced space travel that took place in a time period only two years from now; however, at the current rate of the space program, mankind is nowhere near the technology showed by the book. Clarke uses concepts of space travel that can still only be dreamed of today. Clarke, an author of the sixties, had ...
    Related: odyssey, outer space, space odyssey, space program, space shuttle, space technology, space travel
  • Aerodynamics Of Planes - 1,142 words
    Aerodynamics Of Planes Ever since I was little I was amazed at the ability for a machine to fly. I have always wanted to explore ideas of flight and be able to actually fly. I think I may have found my childhood fantasy in the world of aeronautical engineering. The object of my paper is to give me more insight on my future career as an aeronautical engineer. This paper was also to give me ideas of the physics of flight and be to apply those physics of flight to compete in a high school competition. History of Flight The history of flying dates back as early as the fifteenth century. A Renaissance man named Leonardo da Vinci introduced a flying machine known as the ornithopter. Da Vinci propo ...
    Related: aerodynamics, u.s. military, flying machines, space shuttle, wing
  • Aerodynamics Of Planes - 1,137 words
    ... e air over the wings creating lift. This initial force is usually found in the form of a propeller or a jet engine. An exception to those forms of thrust is a glider. A glider still needs an initial force to begin flight, which is usually found in a tow plane. The most commonly used thrust mechanism is a propeller. The propeller will continue to be the most commonly used because of its effectiveness and cheapness. Due to the jet engines high cost and high speeds it will remain primarily a military aircraft power plant. The physics of thrust used in aircraft is semi-complicated. Firstly, in the case of the propeller the propeller must be large enough to displace or pull enough air to keep ...
    Related: aerodynamics, military aircraft, high cost, space shuttle, hits
  • Boeing 700 - 1,009 words
    ... make the plane six seats abreast. Douglas was the main competition in the beginning has a plane that was five seats abreast. Even with Douglass advantage in speed and range it could never match the seat per-mile cost the 737 gave. The single decision, which meant about a 17inch increase of diameter over the DOUGLAS DC-9, meant the success of the 737 and the failure of the DC-9. Above: Comparison between the DC-9 and 737 cross-sections. With the ruggedness of the 737 it sees several applications for the Military. Its most widely used application is as a training aid for both pilots and navigators. Pilots use the USAF designated T-43 737s as a flight trainer for large cargo and transport ...
    Related: boeing, control system, american airlines, space shuttle, pilots
  • Business Ethics - 1,474 words
    Business Ethics As a corporate manager of a publicly held company, one is responsible for the interests of many different stakeholders. In the past, it has been a very common assumption and practice that corporate managers of a company should strive to act solely for the benefit of shareholders, or owners of the company. Corporate managers were trained to take any actions necessary or use any means possible to improve the bottom line; or profits, without regard to other stakeholders. As a business student at San Diego State, I had adopted this same bottom line philosophy that had been preached to me since the day of my first business class. I had bought into these teachings so wholeheartedly ...
    Related: business ethics, doing business, ethics, acid rain, utilitarian perspective
  • Challenger - 2,433 words
    Challenger It was a cold, crisp, and damp morning on the Florida Space Coast as the space shuttle Challenger raced through the sky at speeds approaching mach 2 at an altitude of 104,000 feet when something went perilously wrong. All of America watched, including the family members of the seven doomed crew members, as Challenger exploded into an expansive ball of fire, smoke and steam. An "Oh. . . no!" came as the crews final utterance from the shuttle as the orbiter broke-up. As the reality of what she was seeing became apparent, Pilot Michael John Smiths daughter, 9 year old Erin Smith, could be heard yelling, "Daddy! Daddy! I want you, Daddy! You promised nothing would happen!" Unfortunate ...
    Related: challenger, shuttle challenger, advisory committee, central florida, apollo
  • Challenger - 2,357 words
    ... ere scrutinized. "Mr. OConnor - who flew on the shuttle Atlantis three months before Challenger was destroyed - said his next mission wasnt until 1991." (Price, p1) But there more to the effects than the investigations; there were also many emotional issues that had to be faced. "For the Challenger mission, Robert B. Sieck was Director of shuttle operations at Floridas Kennedy Space Center - a position he still holds. He is also 57, balding and soft spoken. On the wall of his second floor office is a formal portrait of the Challenger Crew, autographed by the seven members. ! There is also a quote from Teddy Roosevelt that he hung after the explosion. It says " the credit belongs to the m ...
    Related: challenger, shuttle challenger, space shuttle, modern physics, stars
  • Challenger Disaster - 1,444 words
    Challenger Disaster The Space Shuttle Challenger Disaster was a preventable disaster that NASA tried to cover up by calling it a mysterious accident. However, two men had the courage to bring the real true story to the eyes of the public and it is to Richard Cook and Roger Boisjoly to whom we are thankful. Many lessons can be learned from this disaster to help prevent further disasters and to improve on organizations ethics. One of the many key topics behind the Challenger disaster is the organizational culture. One of the aspects of an organizational culture is the observable culture of an organization that is what one sees and hears when walking around an organization. There are four parts ...
    Related: challenger, disaster, shuttle challenger, task force, alternative solutions
  • Challenger Disaster - 1,462 words
    ... others see things differently. Sixth, dont be afraid of error; let trial and error be a path of success, if lives are not at stake. Seventh, take time to play and experiment. Eighth, open up to other viewpoints and perspectives and support nonconformity. Finally, believe in creativity. If Thiokol and NASA followed this then maybe they may have decided to avoid the launch. A third key aspect is the whistleblowers. In the Challenger disaster there where two main whistleblowers, Richard Cook who worked for NASA and Roger Boisjoly who was the SRM Seals Engineer with Thiokol. Whistleblowers expose the misdeeds of others in organizations. Both Cook and Boisjoly wrote many memos to their bosses ...
    Related: challenger, disaster, space shuttle, ethical decision, fault
  • Chinas Space Program - 420 words
    Chinas Space Program CHINA CITES 'GREAT PROGRESS' IN MANNED SPACE PROGRAM By Daniel Southerland (c) 1986, The Washington Post PEKING - China has made "great progress" in developing a manned space program and the day it launches a man in space for the first time is "not far off," an official newspaper said Sunday. The overseas edition of the People's Daily, the leading Communist Party newspaper, said China has "already begun the work of choosing its first team of astronauts." Although it gave few details, the article made it sound as though China is preparing to launch its first men into space much sooner than many foreign observers had thought possible. "We have already succeeded in producin ...
    Related: space program, space shuttle, business review, life magazine, chinese
  • City Of Chicopee - 1,192 words
    City Of Chicopee A man by the name of William Pynchon settled in the City of Chicopee in 1638. William Pynchon bought the land in 1641 from the Nipmuck Indian tribe. The land was not officially settled until two brothers by the name of Henry, and Japhet Chapin, bought the land from John Pynchon in 1659. The city name derives from the Indian word, "Chicopee", and is translated to mean "Violent or Raging Waters". The land around Chicopee was mostly farmland for about 150 years, in and around the Connecticut River. The city of Chicopee became an industrial center in the early 1820's, because of the river locations and the people's ability to build factories and use the rivers for power. The cit ...
    Related: city limits, police department, state legislature, on the road, boat
  • Eileen Collins And Chandra Observatory - 492 words
    Eileen Collins And Chandra Observatory A hydrogen fuel leak, which could have caused an engine shutdown, costly delays on the launching pad, and a year of technical difficulties didnt stop the successful launch of the $1.5 billion Chandra X-Ray Observatory on the Space Shuttle Columbia. Nor did it stop Eileen Collins, 42, from becoming NASAs first female commander ever after 95 missions. Collins, who has logged over 5,000 hours of airtime in thirty types of aircraft and 537 of those hours in space, served as pilot in her last two missions in 1995 and 1997, and felt well prepared to handle anything. So, when a short circuit occurred, as Commander, Collins braced for every possible emergency, ...
    Related: chandra, eileen, hubble space, space shuttle, inquiry
  • Ethical Management Procedures Manage - 657 words
    Ethical Management Procedures Manage Ethical Management Procedures Manage There are so many instances in life where ethics play a major role in decisions that we, as humans, make. Ethical decision making processes take place mostly when conclusions are reached that directly effect people, but what are ethics? The Random House-Webster's Dictionary of Modern English defines ethics as: The branch of philosophy dealing with values relating to human conduct, with respect to the rightness and wrongness of actions and the goodness and badness of motives and ends. This paints a pretty clear picture of what it means to make ethical decisions. This sounds like if you just follow your conscience then i ...
    Related: ethical, ethical decision, ethical decision-making, manage, management
  • Flashbulb Memories - 1,647 words
    Flashbulb Memories About one year ago I remember hearing about some very awful news. My grandmother had died suddenly. In my mind it was impossible that this could happen. No one who was close to me had ever died before. It was even harder to believe because my grandmother had been much more healthy than her husband. She still worked as a babysitter during the days, and that is where she died. She was taking care of a four year old child and had a stroke while sitting in a chair. The little boy just thought she fell asleep. He tried very hard to wake her up, but obviously couldnt. When the paramedics finally came they said she had died the minute it happened. To me the strangest part of my m ...
    Related: traumatic stress disorder, stress disorder, space shuttle, update, studying
  • Hal Is Not Guilty - 1,266 words
    Hal Is Not Guilty In a court of law, killing while mentally disabled, killing under orders and killing in self-defense are sufficient justifications for taking anothers life. With this in mind, was HAL justified in killing the crewmembers of the discovery, or were Hals actions murderous and should he be brought to trial? Can Hal be blamed? The computer basically has 3 excuses for killing the crewmembers of the Discovery. First, Hal was disabled. Second, Hal was killing under orders. Lastly, Hal was killing in self-defense. In absence of free moral will, there cannot be moral responsibility. This is a point argued in Dr. Helms class lecture. I assert that Hal did not have free moral will, bec ...
    Related: emotional intelligence, human error, space shuttle, machine, creature
  • In My Short Life On This Planet I Have Come To Question Things That Many Take Upon Blind Faith We All Know That We Must Some - 1,204 words
    In my short life on this planet I have come to question things that many take upon blind faith. We all know that we must some day die; yet we continuously deny the forces at work inside ourselves, which want to search out the answers of what may or may not come after. It is far easier for humanity to accept that they will go to a safe haven and be rewarded for their lives with pleasures and fantasies of an unfathomable scale than to question the existence of a supposed omnipotent being. Yet, there are a few of us humans who tend to question the why's and wherefore's that society puts forth to us. We question the existence of God, or the creation of mankind rather than blindly accepting faith ...
    Related: blind, planet, big bang theory, scientific facts, confirmation
  • Introduction To The Accident - 1,183 words
    Introduction to the Accident It was a clear sunny day at Kennedy Space Center in Florida with a temperature of 36 degrees which was 15 degrees cooler than NASA has ever sent a shuttle to space. Aboard the space shuttle was a civilian school teacher which made the Challenger such a publicized event. After being delayed five times from bad weather the Challenger was schueled to be launched at 11:38 AM Eastern Standard time on January 28, 1986. Seventy-three seconds after leaving the launch pad 39B the Challenger would explode. The Challenger Tragedy The problems started .6 seconds after ignition. With the temperature at 15 degrees below the NASA experience mark, a black smoke started to come o ...
    Related: accident, kennedy space center, space shuttle, control system, tang
  • Japanese Americans - 1,724 words
    Japanese Americans The Japanese Americans have maintained loyalty to the United States throughout the history of there immigration beginning in 1843 (Leathers, 6). Over the years, they have persevered through the trials and tribulations of discrimination and prejudice. The white community often discriminated them because of the misunderstanding of their language and culture. They overcame this obstacle, and became productive citizens of the United States of America. The immigration of the Japanese into the United States was first recorded in 1843. Because of the strong currents and winds, sea traders and fishing fleets from many nations learned to exploit these winds and currents to travel f ...
    Related: american public, american society, american state, japanese, japanese american, japanese government, native americans
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