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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: soviet military

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  • Communism East Europe - 3,047 words
    Communism East Europe TITLE: Why did communism collapse in Eastern Europe? SUBJECT: European Studies B EDUCATION: First year university GRADE: first honour AUTHOR'S COMMENTS: I liked it. Interested to hear other people's comments. TUTOR'S COMMENTS: Well done!! Extremely informative. Well researched. Good Layout. Stress Gorbachev's role more. Communism is like Prohibition - its a good idea but it wont work (Will Rogers, 1927) (1) This essay will give a brief introduction to communism. It will then discuss the various factors which combined to bring about the collapse of Communism in Eastern Europe. It will examine each of these factors and evaluate the effect of each. Finally it will attempt ...
    Related: communism, east europe, east germany, eastern europe, western europe
  • Communism East Europe - 3,045 words
    Communism East Europe TITLE: Why did communism collapse in Eastern Europe? SUBJECT: European Studies B EDUCATION: First year university GRADE: first honour AUTHOR'S COMMENTS: I liked it. Interested to hear other people's comments. TUTOR'S COMMENTS: Well done!! Extremely informative. Well researched. Good Layout. Stress Gorbachev's role more. Communism is like Prohibition - its a good idea but it wont work (Will Rogers, 1927) (1) This essay will give a brief introduction to communism. It will then discuss the various factors which combined to bring about the collapse of Communism in Eastern Europe. It will examine each of these factors and evaluate the effect of each. Finally it will attempt ...
    Related: communism, east europe, east germany, eastern europe, western europe
  • Communism East Europe - 2,955 words
    ... a contributing factor to the collapse of communism in Eastern Europe. If a party has not got the support of a majority, then it has a weak political basis. The fact that undemocratic means were used to ensure that the communists came to, and then maintained, power shows that communism was a political failure. Throughout the history of communism in Russia, never once did the party gain a majority support or truly succeed in suppressing public demonstrations of antipathy towards communism. It can therefore be argued that a political leadership with no political basis or support could ever hope to survive. Another important factor to note is communisms utter failure in relation to society a ...
    Related: century europe, communism, east europe, east european, east german, east germany, eastern europe
  • Countering Terrorism - 1,642 words
    Countering Terrorism Countering Terrorism There are currently more than 1500 terrorist organizations and groups being monitored in the United States. Terrorists by definition kill people and destroy property in order to advance a political agenda. We must make every effort to protect American citizens from these attacks. In the future that will require both state of the art measures to monitor terrorist activities and the movement of materials used for these activities, but also response scenarios in the event of an actual incident. The United States has consistently set a good example of no negotiations with terrorists and attempting to bring alleged terrorists to trial. We need to support ...
    Related: counter terrorism, countering, terrorism, soviet military, health organization
  • Cuban History - 1,542 words
    ... nd. The agrarian reform laws promulgated in its first years mainly affected U.S. sugar interests; the operation of plantations by companies controlled by non-Cuban stockholders was prohibited, and the Castro regime initially de-emphasized sugar production in favor of food crops. Break with the United States When the Castro government expropriated an estimated $1 billion in U.S.-owned properties in 1960, Washington responded by imposing a trade embargo. A complete break in diplomatic relations occurred in January 1961, and on April 17 of that year U.S.-supported and -trained anti-Castro exiles landed an invasion force in the Bay of Pigs in southern Cuba. Ninety of the invaders were killed ...
    Related: cuban, cuban government, cuban missile, cuban missile crisis, cuban revolution, history
  • Cuban Missile Crisis - 1,285 words
    ... in case of American attack. Approximately 42,000 Soviet soldiers were ready to launch the nukes within a few hours notice. The Soviet commander in Cuba, General Issa Pliyev, was prepared to use every one of those warheads, should the United States invade Cuba. Neither of the Kennedy brothers had any idea that Cuba was ready to launch nuclear warheads at the first sign of an invasion (Hersh 355). During the meeting with Gromyko, the members of Excomm were attempting to agree on a plan. Most leaned towards the strategy of a naval blockade. In case the blockade failed to get Khrushchev to remove the missiles, military action could act as a backup plan. A few fears were voiced, however, suc ...
    Related: crisis, cuban, cuban missile, cuban missile crisis, missile, missile crisis
  • Cuban Missile Crissis - 1,338 words
    Cuban Missile Crissis The Cuban Missile Crisis by Tim Seigel History period 7 December 11, 1998 Back in 1962 most people thought there could not be a nuclear war. It was a time occupied by the Cold War. They were wrong. The U.S.A, Soviet Union, and Cuban countries were so close they could feel nuclear war breathing down their necks. The people of the U.S. were so close to being incinerated, and they didn't even know it. The Soviets had such a build up of missiles in Cuba they could have wiped-out most of the continental United States. The build up of these missiles, and the problems faced in October of 1962 are known as the Cuban missile Crisis. On October twenty second, 1962, John F. Kenned ...
    Related: cuban, cuban missile, cuban missile crisis, missile, missile crisis
  • Distinctive Aspects Of Soviet And Russian - 1,164 words
    DISTINCTIVE ASPECTS OF SOVIET AND RUSSIAN MILITARY THINKING HISTORY 421 This research paper will argue that there are four main areas in which Soviet thinking about war, strategy and defense was, and to a large extent is, distinct from Western thinking. Firstly, Soviet and Western thinking were governed by different aims. While the Soviet aim was messianic, the West was content to defend national interests. Secondly, Russian military thinking is more holistic than Western military thinking. This means that the Russians, unlike many in the West, do not draw sharp lines between different sectors such as the military and civilian components. Thirdly, Russian thinking is based on systematic use ...
    Related: distinctive, russian, soviet, soviet military, soviet union
  • Distinctive Aspects Of Soviet And Russian - 1,149 words
    ... War, showed the importance of simple, standardized and compatible weapon systems. The importance of this derives from the costs of learning to use new weapon systems and the increased probability of breakdown as a result of increased technological complexity. Thus, instead of complex and revolutionary weapon development Soviet weapon systems often developed in an evolutionary manner. For example, there is a long line of Soviet tanks from the T-34 to the T-72 which all have great similarities and interchangeable parts. Similarly, airplanes (MiGs) and guns (such as the AKs) are designed using past systems as close models. The crucial mechanism in this process of matching weapons to practi ...
    Related: distinctive, russian, soviet, soviet army, soviet empire, soviet military
  • Geopolitics - 1,575 words
    ... barrel infected by one rotten one, the corruption of Greece would infect Iran and all to the east. It would also carry infection to Africa through Asia Minor and Egypt, and to Europe through Italy, France, already threatened by the strongest domestic Communist parties in Western Europe (Acheson, 1969). Presenting "apples in a barrel" is a mark of excessive pride in the American intellectuals of statecraft with the Truman administration. Thus when Truman declares in his speech that it is "necessary only to glance at a map," the map he has in his mind is one where states are equivalent to dominoes about to fall. Only physical proximity is seen as geography and nothing else. The geopolitica ...
    Related: geopolitics, third world, soviet military, military technology, rapid
  • Joseph Stalin - 721 words
    Joseph Stalin Joseph Stalin was a Georgian Marxist revolutionary leader and later dictator of the USSR. He was born in Gori, Georgia. He studied at Tiflis Orthodox where he was expelled from in 1899. After joining a Georgian Social Democratic organization in 1898, he became active in a revolutionary underground, and he was twice sent to Siberia. As a leading Bolshevik he played an active role in the October Revolution. In 1922, he became general secretary of the Party Central Committee, a position that he held until the day of his death. Stalin also occupied other key positions, which enabled him to build up enormous personal power in the government. This is a key point in Stalins life where ...
    Related: joseph, joseph stalin, stalin, soviet military, adolph hitler
  • Stalin And Mao - 1,336 words
    Stalin And Mao History has shown that strong individuals and revolutionary ideas can have a major impact on a country. Leaders are often driven by what they perceive as a desire to create a more perfect country. Frequently their egos and methods sway them from the realization of the ideals they set out to achieve. Every country has encountered a noteworthy leader at one point or another. Some countries realize this, and take advantage of the fact, while others let him or her pass slip away. A great leader has an impact on a country, an impact that lasts, one that can be looked upon as an example for future generations. Mao Zedong, of China, and Joseph Stalin, of the Soviet Union were great l ...
    Related: joseph stalin, stalin, leap forward, soviet union, worker
  • The Chinese Communist Revolution - 1,178 words
    The Chinese Communist Revolution The Chinese Communist Revolution During the mid 19th century many upheavals and rebellions launched China into a new course of modernization. These also lead to the creation of the Chinese Communist party (CCP) which in 1949 over through the government to take all government control. Mao Zedong Mao was born on December 26 in 1893, in a peasent family in Shao-shan in the Hunan province. As a child he worked in the fields and attended a local primary school. He was frequetly in conflict with his strict father. Beginning in 1911, the year that the republican forces of Sun Yat-Sen launched the overthrow of the Manchu dynasty, Mao spent allmost ten years in Chang- ...
    Related: chinese, chinese communist, chinese communist party, communist, communist party, communist revolution
  • The Cuban Missile Crisis Could Have Resulted In Nuclear Warholocaust: - 791 words
    The Cuban Missile Crisis Could Have Resulted In Nuclear War/Holocaust: The Cuban Missile Crisis could have resulted in Nuclear War/Holocaust: The closest the world has come to nuclear war was the Cuban Missile Crisis of October 1962. The Soviets had installed nuclear missiles in Cuba, just 90 miles off the coast of the United States. U.S. armed forces were at their highest state of readiness. Most people were consumed in the fear of an all out nuclear war, or were they? In all actuality most people were more concerned with their lives and how the Yankees would fare in the World Series. It all started when U.S. intelligence reconnaissance flights (U2 spy-plane) verified USSR constructing laun ...
    Related: crisis, cuban, cuban missile, cuban missile crisis, missile, missile crisis, nuclear
  • The Ethics Of World Domination - 1,303 words
    The Ethics of World Domination The Ethics of World Domination Throughout the past 70 years the U.S. has been involved in hundreds of conflicts all around the globe. Every time the United States troops are deployed to a foreign country, citizens of the U.S. want to know why. People begin to ask questions like, "what is the purpose of this?" or "what is the nature of our involvement?" Nobody wants to see the strong youth of our nation shipped of to a foreign country to get slaughtered without good cause. Millions of American men and women have devoted their lives to the service and protection of the freedoms that we as citizens of the United States hold dear. These people deserve the utmost re ...
    Related: domination, ethics, world domination, gulf war, korean government
  • The Reasons For The Fall Of Socialismcommunism And The Troubles - 1,542 words
    The Reasons for the fall of Socialism/Communism and the Troubles of Starting the New Democratic System in the Russian Federation "Let's not talk about Communism. Communism was just an idea, just pie in the sky." Boris Yeltsin (b. 1931), Russian politician, president. Remark during a visit to the U.S. Quoted in: Independent (London, 13 Sept. 1989). The fall of the Communist regime in the Soviet Union was more than a political event. The powerful bond between economics and politics that was the integral characteristic of the state socialist system created a situation that was unique for the successor states of the Soviet Union. The Communist regime was so ingrain in every aspect of Soviet life ...
    Related: consumer goods, super power, russian federation, china, manufacturing
  • The Role Of Bobby Kennedy Throughout The Cuban Missile Crisis - 2,552 words
    The Role Of Bobby Kennedy Throughout The Cuban Missile Crisis Introduction On the morning of Tuesday October 16, 1962, President John F. Kennedy was reading the Tuesday morning newspapers in his bed at the Whitehouse. Not twenty fours hours before, McGeorge Bundy, Kennedys national security adviser, received the results of Major Richard S. Heysers U-2 mission over San Cristobal Cuba. In light of recent mysterious Soviet and Cuban activities developing in the Caribbean Sea and Atlantic Ocean, the presidents administration had given the order to conduct reconnaissance missions over the island of Cuba. In particular a fifty-mile trapezoidal swath of territory in western Cuba was to be looked up ...
    Related: bobby, bobby kennedy, crisis, cuban, cuban missile, cuban missile crisis, important role
  • Tom Clancy: Believable Plots - 1,116 words
    ... ife, too." (pg. 211, TCTK) His misfortunes caused by the State created a realistic reaction of a human being. Filitov turned against the Soviet Union and became an American spy. The defection was easily accepted by the reader because of Filitov's past and reason for anger and lost trust for the Soviet State. With a realistic character and importance which Filitov held as a spy helped develop a believable plot. Another character in TCTK who greatly contributed to the plot's approval by the reader was the behaviour of a true Communist and a human being, Colonel Vatutin. He, like many other characters, made decisions based on his beliefs about the State and also out of fear for losing power ...
    Related: york prentice, great britain, soviet state, imagining, bureaucracy
  • World War Ii - 1,849 words
    World War II In the early morning hours of September 1, 1939, the German armies marched into Poland. On September 3 the British and French surprised Hitler by declaring war on Germany, but they had no plans for rendering active assistance to the Poles. The Battle of Britain In the summer of 1940, Hitler dominated Europe from the North Cape to the Pyrenees. His one remaining active enemyBritain, under a new prime minister, Winston Churchillvowed to continue fighting. Whether it could was questionable. The British army had left most of its weapons on the beaches at Dunkirk. Stalin was in no mood to challenge Hitler. The U.S., shocked by the fall of France, began the first peacetime conscriptio ...
    Related: world war ii, japanese navy, u.s. government, prime minister, dealt
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