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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: southern italy

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  • A Farewell To Arms By Ernest Hemingway 1899 1961 - 1,322 words
    A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway (1899 - 1961) A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway (1899 - 1961) Type of Work: Psychological realism Setting Italy and Switzerland; World War I Principal Characters Fyederic Henry, an American in the Italian army Catiteritte Barkley, a British nurse Rinaldi, an Italian surgeon and Frederic's friend Miss Ferguson, a British nurse and Catherine's friend Story Overveiw Lieutenant Frederic Henry, a handsome young American, had returned from leave in southern Italy to the front, where he served in the Italian ambulance corps. The war was still leaning toward victory for the Italians. During dinner, Lieutenant Rinaldi, Frederic's jovial surgeon friend needl ...
    Related: a farewell to arms, ernest, ernest hemingway, farewell, farewell to arms, hemingway
  • Born In 1887, Padre Pio Is Not Yet Canonized Francesco, Named In Honor Of St Francis Of Assisi, Was One Of Eight Children Of - 967 words
    Born in 1887, Padre Pio is not yet canonized. Francesco, named in honor of St. Francis of Assisi, was one of eight children of Grazio and Maria Forgione. Francesco was very devout even as a child, and at an early age felt drawn to the priesthood. He became a Capuchin novice at the age of sixteen and received the habit in 1902. Francesco was ordained to the priesthood in 1910 after seven years of study and became known as Padre Pio. On September 20, 1918, Padre Pio was kneeling in front of a large crucifix when he received the visible marks of the crucifixion. The doctor who examined Padre Pio could not find any natural cause for the wounds. Padre Pio describes what happened in a letter that ...
    Related: francis, church history, doctor who, southern italy, bishop
  • Byzantine Empire - 1,969 words
    Byzantine Empire The greatest of medieval civilizations was the Eastern Roman Empire. The Roman Empire was divided in 395. The Western half, ruled from Rome, was ruled by the barbarians in the 5th century. The Eastern half, known as the Byzantine Empire, lasted for more than over 1,000 years. The Byzantine Empire was one of the leading civilizations in the world. In 324, Constantine, the first Christian emperor, became the single ruler of the Roman Empire. He set up his Eastern headquarters at the ancient Greek colony of Byzantium in 330. This city, later renamed Constantinople, was also known as new Rome. It became the capital of the Byzantines after the Roman Empire was divided. Constantin ...
    Related: byzantine, byzantine art, byzantine empire, empire, roman empire
  • Caesar And Pompey - 1,665 words
    Caesar And Pompey The conference at Luca was a very important marker in the course of events in Rome during this time. The principal result of the conference was that Caesar was assured of sufficient time to complete the conquest of Gaul, but conceded parity of armament to his partners and gave Pompey the sole control of affairs in the capital. Soon after that very violent and threatening riots arose in Rome. The riots brought about an emergency coalition between the Senate and Pompey. Why should this alliance not be extend to other objects? asked many of Pompeys loyal senators. This swelling group of extremists began to desire to rid themselves of Caesar totally. For the next two years they ...
    Related: caesar, pompey, new deal, southern italy, joint
  • Early History Of The Celts - 1,970 words
    Early History Of The Celts INTRODUCTION The Ancient Celts were not an illiterate people, but they transferred their knowledge orally. They had an alphabet of twenty letters called Ogham. Each letter was named after a tree from the land where they lived. Ogham was used on standing stones, primarily on graves and boundary markers. The primary sources of information about the Celts are, in that light, the texts written by the Romans who were in touch with them and Christian monks, who lived in Irish monasteries in the Middle Ages. Caesar, Livy and Tacitus, wrote about their contemporaries who lived in a way different than themselves and therefore were considered barbarians, but even though they ...
    Related: celts, early history, history, oral tradition, central europe
  • Frederick Barbarossa - 1,817 words
    Frederick Barbarossa Frederick Barbarossa, like other men of his age, was influenced by a growing resurgence of neoclassical sensibilities. It should not therefore be considered surprising that he would have considered himself ruling as Frederick, by the grace of God emperor of the Romans and august forever...(A letter to Otto of Freisling) He like other leaders before and since saw and welcomed the prestige and sense of legitimacy offered by the title of Roman Emperor. To achieve this, kings since the time of Charlamegne had often traveled to Rome in order to be crowned Emperor. The pope as heir to the Church of Constantine provided the symbolic link between the Roman past and the present E ...
    Related: barbarossa, frederick, king richard, holy land, subsequently
  • Greek Architecture - 1,026 words
    Greek Architecture The architecture of ancient Greece is represented by buildings in the sanctuaries and cities of mainland Greece, the Aegean islands, southern Italy and Sicily, and the Ionian coast of Turkey. Monumental Greek architecture began in the archaic period, flourished through the classical and Hellenistic periods, and saw the first of many revivals during the Roman Empire. The roots of Greek architecture lie in the tradition of local Bronze Age house and palaces. The following paper will cover the basic forms of Greek architecture. One of the many types of Greek building structures was Sacred Architecture. The Greeks conceived of their gods in human form, as anthropomorphic repre ...
    Related: architecture, greek, greek architecture, roman architecture, city states
  • Hannibal Of Carthage - 808 words
    Hannibal Of Carthage Hannibal of Carthage: "The Father of Strategy" Through out history there have been many great military leaders, Alexander the Great, Napoleon, Generals Washington, Grant and Charles Lewis Puller. The one however that sticks out the most is General Hannibal of Carthage. Often called the "Father of Strategy" his march over the Alps is one of the most famous attacks in military history. Hannibal beat the Roman Army time and time again before in suicide in 183 BC. Hannibal was born 247 BC, the son of Hamilcar Barca, the current General of the Carthaginian Army. Hannibal's training as a military leader began at the age of nine when he went to Spain to be with his father. At H ...
    Related: carthage, hannibal, alexander the great, military history, offering
  • Herodotus - 290 words
    Herodotus Herodotus Essay Herodotus of Halicarnassus was born about 484 B.C. he died 60 years later. For the time he lived in this age was very old though by today's standards it is not. The reason why his age was so outstanding was in his time the average man live for maybe half that because of the harsh living conditions. So with out even any of his writings of thoughts he would standout as a above average man for his time. But his age was not all that was amazing about him. In his life Herodotus traveled a lot. Some of the places he traveled to were southern Italy, Lower Egypt, and the Caucasus. This land was in his time much of the known world, which we now call the ancient known world. ...
    Related: herodotus, living conditions, southern italy, persian wars, scholar
  • Industrial Revolution In Different Countries - 492 words
    Industrial Revolution in Different Countries Industrial Revolution in Different Countries After the first appearance of industrialization in Britain, many other nations joined in the industrial revolution. In the 19th century the Industrial Revolution spread to the United States, Germany, France, Belgium, and much of the rest of western Europe. Sometimes, British workers and entrepreneurs moved to other countries and taught the manufacturing techniques they had learned in Britain. Change happened somewhat differently in each setting because of varying resources, political conditions, and social and economic status. In France, industrial development was delayed by political turmoil and a lack ...
    Related: different countries, different cultures, first industrial, industrial revolution, economic status
  • Italy - 439 words
    Italy By. Sean Burnham & Andy Price Location, Size, and Surrounding Waters Italy is a country that looks like a boot. It has a population of about 57.8 million people. It is 116,305 square miles in area. Some of the surrounding waters are the Tyrrhenian Sea, which is west of Italy. The Adriatic Sea, which is east of Italy, and Ionian Sea, that is southeast of Italy. The capital city of Italy is Rome. Rivers and Mountains Some of the rivers in Italy include the Po River, which is the biggest, and the Tiber River, which isn't quite as big as the Po. Some of the well-known mountain ranges are the Alps and the Dolomites. Climate The climate in Italy is much like the climate of York, Nebraska. It ...
    Related: italy, northern italy, southern italy, communist party, political parties
  • Italy Geograpy - 1,109 words
    Italy Geograpy Italy is a country in southern Europe. It is located in the Mediterranean region. Italy is a peninsula that has the Tyrrhenlan Sea to its west, the Adriatic Sea to its east, and the Lonian Sea to its southeast. Austria and Switzerland border Italy to the north. France borders Italy to the northwest. The Capital of Italy is Rome, also the largest city. The official language of Italy is Italian. About 98% of the people in Italy are Roman Catholic. The pope lives in Rome. Italy is 116,320 sq. miles. In 1994 the population estimate was about 57,107,000 (491 per sq. mile). Italy's official name is Repubblica Italiana (Italian Republic). The National Anthem is Fratelli d'Italia (Bro ...
    Related: italy, northern italy, southern italy, foreign trade, environmental issues
  • Monasticism In The Middle Ages - 1,575 words
    Monasticism in the Middle Ages During the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, the monasteries served as one of the great civilizing forces by being the centers of education, preservers of learning, and hubs of economic development. Western monasticism was shaped by Saint Benedict of Nursia, who in 529, established a monastery in southern Italy. He created a workable model for running a monastery that was used by most western monastic orders of the Early Middle Ages. To the three vows of obedience, poverty, and chastity, which formed the foundation of most of the old monasteries, he added the vow of manual labor. Each monk did some useful work, such as, plowing the fields, planting and harvesti ...
    Related: early middle ages, middle ages, monasticism, fine arts, greeks and romans
  • Money As A Medium - 882 words
    Money As A Medium Money as a Medium Marshall McLuhan's lasting contribution is his vision of the ways technology affects and changes history and culture. McLuhan proposes that technologies are not mere add-ons to who and what humans are but, rather, alter them as though the technologies really are extensions of humans. Technology determines culture and history to the extent that it "shapes and controls the scale and form of human association and action." The introduction of money affected culture in that this new technology gave rise to accelerated change and growth within society. Money increases the volume and diversity of trade and it facilitates the exchange of goods and ideas. It also p ...
    Related: medium, foreign trade, daily life, eighteenth century, mediate
  • Place - 459 words
    PLACE Italy covers 116,320 sq. mi. (301,268 km). Italy lies in southern Europe on the Mediterranean sea. It borders France, Switzerland, Austria, and Yugoslavia. The Alps form Italy's northern and northwestern border. The Apennines occupy the center of Italy's boot-shape peninsula. The highest elevation is 15,521 ft. 58,167,000 people live in Italy. Central and southern Italy have hot summers and mild winters. Northern Italy has a slightly cooler summer than the rest of the country. But it is much cooler in the winter time than the rest of the country. HUMAN AND ENVIRONMENTAL INTERACTION People in Italy wear many different types of clothing. In central and southern Italy people wear short an ...
    Related: roman empire, southern italy, southern europe, france, parliament
  • Pythagoras - 605 words
    Pythagoras Born between 530-569 B.C. Pythagoras of Samos is described as the first "pure mathematician." Pythagoras' father was Mnesarchus of Tyre and Pythais of Samos. Mnesarchus was a merchant who was granted citizenship after he brought corn to Samos during a famine. The citizenship was an act of gratitude. There are accounts that Pythagoras traveled widely with his father, even back to his father's home, Tyre and Italy. During these travels Pythagoras was educated by Chaldaeans and learned scholars in Syria. Little is known about Pythagoras' physical attributes because of the large number of fictitious descriptions. The only description that is taken as fact is a birthmark that Pythagora ...
    Related: pythagoras, philosophical society, southern italy, great philosophers, priesthood
  • Pythagorean Theorm - 1,087 words
    Pythagorean Theorm The Pythagorean Theorem is a geometrical expression used often in math and physics. It used to 2 2 2 find the unknown side of a right triangle. The exponential form of this theorem a + b = c . That is the equation you use when you are looking for the unknown side of a right triangle, and it is what Ill demonstrate on the attached exhibit. The upside down capital L in the bottom of the left hand corner indicates that sides A & B are the legs of the triangle. Since we know side A = 5 inches and B = 3 inches we may fill that in to 2 2 2 or equation for step one. (1) 5 + 3 = c What the theorem will help us find is the c side of this triangle. 2. 25 + 9 = c All we do is distrib ...
    Related: pythagorean, pythagorean theorem, ancient egyptians, left hand, geometry
  • Pythagorus Of Samos - 1,816 words
    Pythagorus Of Samos Pythagoras of Samos Pythagoras of Samos is often described as the first pure mathematician. He is an extremely important figure in the development of mathematics yet we know relatively little about his mathematical achievements. Unlike many later Greek mathematicians, where at least we have some of the books which they wrote, we have nothing of Pythagoras's writings. The society which he led, half religious and half scientific, followed a code of secrecy which certainly means that today Pythagoras is a mysterious figure. We do have details of Pythagoras's life from early biographies which use important original sources yet are written by authors who attribute divine power ...
    Related: samos, men and women, mathematical theory, divine powers, italy
  • Quarter Paper: Antonio Vivaldi And The Music Of His Time - 1,393 words
    Quarter Paper: Antonio Vivaldi and the music of his time Throughout history there have been many distinct periods of time. These various eras are all alike in a way because they all slowly flow into each other. One of these unique times was called the Baroque period. The Baroque time began during the 1600's and ended early during the early 1700's. The way Baroque music was looked at was varied depending on where you looked at it from. In Italy, it was largely energetic and spectacular. Yet, if you were to travel North, you would encounter the "gloom's of muted firelight." This, along with the "shadowy pales of another world," simply means that this music wasn't greatly appreciated in Souther ...
    Related: antonio, antonio vivaldi, baroque music, music, quarter, vivaldi
  • Rappaccinis Daughter - 1,270 words
    Rappaccinis Daughter In Rappaccini's Daughter, Nathaniel Hawthorne examines the combination of good and evil in people through the relationships of the story's main characters. The lovely and yet poisonous Beatrice, the daughter of the scientist Rappaccini, is the central figure of the story, while her neighbor Giovanni becomes the observer, participant, and interpreter of the strange events that transpire within the garden next door. It is Giovanni's inability to understand these events that eventually leads to Beatrice's death. Giovanni sees things that are either all good or all bad. While he is quick to judge Beatrice, he is unable to examine his own motives and thoughts. During the stor ...
    Related: southern italy, young woman, short story, woman, caretaker
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