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  • Confederate Flag In South Carolina - 953 words
    Confederate Flag In South Carolina The Confederate flag that now flies atop the statehouse of South Carolina has been a controversial issue for over 30 years. Raised in 1962 to commemorate the Civil Wars 100th anniversary, it is the only Confederate flag to wave atop any state capitol in the country, and its presence has stirred quite a commotion. Last March, a group that wants the South to secede from the United States staged a Confederate flag-waving rally in Montgomery, Alabama. Hundreds of people signed petitions, demanding that the state follow South Carolinas example and return the Confederate flag to the state capitol. In April, a march against the flags presence was led by Charleston ...
    Related: carolina, confederate, flag, south carolina, african american
  • Land Redistribution In South Carolina - 658 words
    Land Redistribution In South Carolina After the Civil War, the United States was torn on how to provide services to freed slaves, or freedmen. Eventually the Freedmen's Bureau emerged from the confusion. This bureau gave food, shelter, and education to freedmen, but also did one more very important service. The Freedmen's Bureau helped to get the emancipated slaves on their feet by providing land to each of them. "Forty acres and a mule"(Abbot, 52) was the amount of land and property that each family or single man in South Carolina was to get. To freedmen, freedom was only achieved when they were in control of some type of property. Unfortunately, three problem arose; the government needed t ...
    Related: carolina, redistribution, south carolina, president andrew johnson, equal rights
  • 5 Most Influential People In American History - 1,556 words
    5 Most Influential People In American History The United Sates has had a short yet complex history in its two hundred and twenty-four years. She has produced millions and millions of great individuals. These great minds have shaped what America is today. Others, however, have personally molded this magnificent nation with their own acts. John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, John Marshall, Henry Clay and Andrew Jackson are the most influential builders of the United States of America. John Adams was born loyal to the English Crown but evolved into the second President of the Free World. As a lawyer, Adams emerged into politics as an opponent of the Stamp Act and was a leader in the Revolutionary gro ...
    Related: american, american congress, american history, american revolution, american system, history, influential
  • A Boy Of Scotchirish Descent, Whose Ancestors Had Settled In Pennsylvania Before Travelling Through Mountains To Resettle In - 530 words
    A boy of Scotch-Irish descent, whose ancestors had settled in Pennsylvania before travelling through mountains to resettle in southern territory, he was born in 1782 in the Abbeville district of South Carolina on March 18. His family was not rich, nor were they poor; they owned slaves and were regarded not as a part of the ostentation associated with slave-holding at the time but rather as a simple, farm family. His father had an interest in politics and participated locally, something that ultimately catapulted this boy into his future profession. Sent at the age of 12 to live with a Presbyterian minister for a basic education, he was eventually trained at Yale beginning his junior year and ...
    Related: ancestors, mountains, pennsylvania, travelling, fundamental principles
  • A Gold Rush Leads To War - 1,304 words
    A Gold Rush Leads to War A Gold Rush Leads to War The American Civil War (1861-1865) and the Reconstruction period that followed were the bloodiest chapters of American history to date. Brother fought brother as the population was split along sectional lines. The issue of slavery divided the nation's people and the political parties that represented them in Washington. The tension which snapped the uneasy truce between north and south began building over slavery and statehood debates in California. In 1848, settlers discovered gold at Sutter's Mill, starting a mass migration. By 1849, California had enough citizens to apply for statehood. However, the debate over whether the large western st ...
    Related: gold rush, rush, senate race, democratic party, invalid
  • A Gold Rush Leads To War - 1,266 words
    ... and Britain gave up any serious hopes of a Confederate victory. With Britain's vote of confidence also went the possibility of European support for the Confederacy. Without this vital link with the outside world, the Confederacy lost all advantage in the war. Amidst all the turmoil of the Civil War, Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation on January 1, 1863, ending slavery in all territories, including the South, which Lincoln continued to insist was under Union jurisdiction. Recognition of the Proclamation became a required element of Lincoln's "ten-percent plan", whereby 10% of the population of any seceded state could reform the state government and apply for readmission ...
    Related: gold rush, rush, radical republicans, robert e lee, alabama
  • A More Perfect Union: - 1,022 words
    ... e power to regulate trade, the southern states would be nothing more than overseers for the Northern States. On August 21 the debate over the issue of commerce became very closely linked to another explosive issue--slavery. When Martin of Maryland proposed a tax on slave importation, the convention was thrust into a strident discussion of the institution of slavery and its moral and economic relationship to the new government. Rutledge of South Carolina, asserting that slavery had nothing at all to do with morality, declared, Interest alone is the governing principle with nations. Sherman of Connecticut was for dropping the tender issue altogether before it jeopardized the convention. Ma ...
    Related: more perfect union, articles of confederation, bill of rights, northern states, mason
  • Aaron Douglas - 1,128 words
    Aaron Douglas People may ask, what other than a tornado can come out of Kansas? Well, Aaron Douglas was born of May 26, 1899 in Topeka, Kansas. Aaron Douglas was a "Pioneering Africanist" artist who led the way in using African- oriented imagery in visual art during the Harlem Renaissance of 1919- 1929. His work has been credited as the catalyst for the genre incorporating themes in form and style that affirm the validity of the black consciousness and experience in America. His parents were Aaron and Elizabeth Douglas. In 1922, he graduated from the University of Nebraska School of Fine Arts in Lincoln. Who thought that this man would rise to meet W.E.B. Du Bois's 1921 challenge, calling fo ...
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  • Abe Lincoln - 1,352 words
    Abe Lincoln Abraham Lincolns assassination was a malevolent ending to an already bitter and spiteful event in American history, the Civil War. John Wilkes Booth and his group of co-conspirators developed plans in the late summer of 1864 to only kidnap the President and take him the Confederate capital of Richmond and hold him in return for Confederate prisoners of war. Booths group of conspirators: Samuel Arnold, Michael OLaughlen, John Surratt, Lewis Paine, George Atzerodt, David Herold, and Mary Surratt (Johns wife), made plans on March 17, 1865, to capture Lincoln, who was scheduled to see a play at a hospital in the outskirts of Washington. However, Lincoln changed plans and remained in ...
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  • Abraham Lincoln - 1,088 words
    ... in acceptance of the Republican senatorial nomination (June 16, 1858) Lincoln suggested that Douglas, Chief Justice Roger B. Taney, and Democratic presidents Franklin Pierce and James Buchanan had conspired to nationalize slavery. In the same speech he expressed the view that the nation would become either all slave or all free: "A house divided against itself cannot stand." The underdog in the senatorial campaign, Lincoln wished to share Douglas's fame by appearing with him in debates. Douglas agreed to seven debates: in Ottawa, Freeport, Jonesboro, Charleston, Galesburg, Quincy, and Alton, Ill. Lincoln knew that Douglas--now fighting the Democratic Buchanan administration over the cons ...
    Related: abraham, abraham lincoln, lincoln, second inaugural address, south carolina
  • Abuse - 860 words
    Abuse Many people may never experience what it is like to be abused, or to feel hatred for a parent, but in Bastard Out Of Carolina, the reader gets to relive what it is like to be abused through the eyes of a child. This engrossing and wonderfully written story will open your eyes to the reality of child abuse. The story is told through the eyes of Ruth Anne Boatwright, a child brought into the world with an unknown father and a mother who struggled to bring her up properly in a situation bound for despair. This harrowing account will leave you speechless and flabbergasted. Bastard Out Of Carolina is bound to make an everlasting impression in the mind of its readers. Ruth Anne was born into ...
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  • Advice To The President - 527 words
    Advice To The President Advice to the President Mr. President, the moral decline in our country has plummeted since you have been in office. I would like to think that you had no part in this, but I believe that you play a very large role in this issue. First of all, you legalized third-term abortions. You tell us not to kill in the streets, but yet you will stab an infant in the neck without him being able to defend for himself. Secondly, you took the Bible out of schools. In the United States, there is to be no religious persecution. So you just abandon religion? I do not think that solves any problems, in fact, I think it causes more. Since you have taken the Bible out of schools, look at ...
    Related: advice, president nixon, the bible, white house, nixon
  • African Americans In The South - 1,211 words
    African Americans In The South As a social and economic institution, slavery originated in the times when humans began farming instead of hunting and gathering. Slave labor became commonplace in ancient Greece and Rome. Slaves were created through the capture of enemies, the birth of children to slave parents, and means of punishment. Enslaved Africans represented many different peoples, each with distinct cultures, religions, and languages. Most originated from the coast or the interior of West Africa, between present-day Senegal and Angola. Other enslaved peoples originally came from Madagascar and Tanzania in East Africa. Slavery became of major economic importance after the sixteenth cen ...
    Related: african, african american, american civil, american civil war, american independence, american population, south carolina
  • African Dimensions Of The Stono Rebellion - 395 words
    African Dimensions of the Stono Rebellion When studying the Stono Rebellion of 1739, historians only had one eyewitness report of this. I think the reason they didnt document it very well was because the Southerners were so outnumbered by the slaves, they didnt want the other slaves to get ideas of rebellion. The historians also failed to look at the big picture. What they were in Africa. This played a big role in the Stono Rebellion. To understand the full role of Africa, one has to look at the kingdom of Kongo between 1680 and 1740 rather than just a broad overview of the African culture. This is due to the diversity of the Africans language and culture. Part of this uprising is due to the ...
    Related: african, african culture, rebellion, slave trade, religious leaders
  • Al Gore - 1,488 words
    Al Gore Al Gore Running mate: Sen. Joe Lieberman. Current position: Vice president of the United States Political experience: Vice-President of the United States (1993-present); US senator from Tennessee (1985-1993); candidate for the Democratic nomination for president (1987-1988); US representative from Tennessee, (1977-1985) Work experience: farmer (1973-1990); investigative reporter, editorial writer, The Tennessean (1971-1976); home builder and land developer, Tanglewood Home Builders Co. (1971-1976) Party affiliation: Democrat Educational background: • B.A., Harvard University, 1969; • Vanderbilt University Law School, 1974-76. Military experience: • U.S. Army, 1969-1 ...
    Related: gore, achievement gap, john adams, zero tolerance policy, carolina
  • All Hail To The Naacp - 415 words
    All Hail To The Naacp "All Hail to the NAACP" All hail to the to the NAACP- making sure equality is enforced, and social injustice does not prevail. "Founded in 1909 in New York, by a group of black and white citizens in order to ensure the political, educational, social, and economic equality of minority group citizens of the United States and eliminate racial prejudice. The NAACP seeks to remove all barriers of racial discrimination through democratic process." (www.NAACP.org) This may be true; however, I seem, too often, to see another side of this organization. In recent months and years, their agendas have been advanced only through the media and political outcries, not through the demo ...
    Related: naacp, social equality, native americans, racial prejudice, lawn
  • American Identity - 1,828 words
    American Identity The American Identity It can strongly be argued, as it has for many years, whether or not an American identity ever occurred between 1776 and 1861. The answer to this question really depends on your definition of what an identity consists of. An identity is the sameness in all that constitutes the objective reality of a thing; oneness. The thirteen colonies tried hard to find a sense of themselves as a nation even before they had a nation. Nationality became an American invention (notes). To find an identity the thirteen colonies created a flag, symbols of nationality (bald eagle, pluribus Unum), and they established national heroes (George Washington). Next they began to s ...
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  • American Revolution - 3,384 words
    American Revolution In the aftermath of the French and Indian War, Britain needed a new imperial design, but the situation in America was anything but favorable to change. Long accustomed to a large measure of independence, the colonies were demanding more, not less, freedom, particularly now that the French menace had been eliminated. To put a new system into effect, and to tighten control, Parliament had to contend with colonists trained in self-government and impatient with interference. One of the first things that British attempted was the organization of the interior. The conquest of Canada and of the Ohio Valley necessitated policies that would not alienate the French and Indian inhab ...
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  • American Revolution - 3,394 words
    ... s for the first time in the 150 year old history of the British colonies in America, the Americans will pay tax not to their own local legislatures in America, but directly to England. Under the Stamp Act, all printed materials are taxed, including; newspapers, pamphlets, bills, legal documents, licenses, almanacs, dice and playing cards. The American colonists quickly unite in opposition, led by the most influential segments of colonial society - lawyers, publishers, land owners, ship builders and merchants - who are most affected by the Act, which is scheduled to go into effect on November 1. 1765 - Also in March, the Quartering Act requires colonists to house British troops and supply ...
    Related: american, american colonies, american colonists, american revolution, england colonies
  • Americans In Civil War - 1,088 words
    Americans In Civil War The foundation for black participation in the Civil War began more than a hundred years before the outbreak of the war. Blacks in America had been in bondage since early colonial times. In 1776, when Jefferson proclaimed mankinds inalienable right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness, the institution of slavery had become firmly established in America. Blacks worked in the tobacco fields of Virginia, in the rice fields of South Carolina, and toiled in small farms and shops in the North. Foner and Mahoney report in A House Divided, America in the Age of Lincoln that, "In 1776, slaves composed forty percent of the population of the colonies from Maryland south ...
    Related: civil war, great american, house divided, right to life, bear
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