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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: sociologists

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  • Sociology The Comparative Method Sociologists Have Embraced What Is Known As The Comparative Method As The Most Efficient Way - 1,899 words
    Sociology The Comparative Method Sociologists have embraced what is known as the comparative method as the most efficient way to expose taken-for-granted 'truths' or laws that people have adopted. But what is this comparative method and how does it work? Are there any advantages/disadvantages to exposing these false 'truths'. What forms or variations of the comparative method exist? In the pages to follow I will attempt to give you some insight and understanding of what the comparative method is, and how it works. The comparative method, simply put, is the process of comparing two things (in our case societies, or the people that make up society) and seeing if the result of the comparison sh ...
    Related: comparative, efficient, sociologists, sociology, ancient greece
  • Abused Wives - 1,981 words
    Abused Wives "Every three minutes a woman is raped! Every fifteen seconds a woman is battered! Every six hours a woman is battered to death!" (Mckenzie, Cover) Research indicates that half the women in this country will experience some sort of violence, from a husband or boyfriend, in one form or another and more than one-third are battered repeatedly every year. (Wilson, pg. 8) Domestic violence is often dismissed as a problem that affects only a small group of women, however, as the facts show, the problem is not rare. The term "wife abuse" has many definitions: One of these is the use or threat of physical violence against a partner in a primary relationship. Physical violence is defined ...
    Related: wives, equal opportunity, psychological treatment, law enforcement, carolina
  • Adult Illiteracy - 3,413 words
    Adult Illiteracy Learning to read is like learning to drive a car. You take lessons and learn the mechanics and the rules of the road. After a few weeks you have learned how to drive, how to stop, how to shift gears, how to park, and how to signal. You have also learned to stop at a red light and understand road signs. When you are ready, you take a road test, and if you pass, you can drive. Phonics-first works the same way. The child learns the mechanics of reading, and when he's through, he can read. Look and say works differently. The child is taught to read before he has learned the mechanics the sounds of the letters. It is like learning to drive by starting your car and driving ahead. ...
    Related: adult, adult literacy, illiteracy, attention deficit, young people
  • African American Culture - 957 words
    African American Culture African American Culture Culture is not a fixed phenomenon, nor is it the same in all places or to all people. It is relative to time, place, and particular people. Learning about other people can help us to understand ourselves and to be better world citizens. One of the most common ways of studying culture is to focus on the differences within and among cultures. Although their specifics may vary form one culture to another, sociologists refer to those elements or characteristics that can be found in every know society as cultural universals. For example, in all societies, funeral rites include expression of grief, disposing of the dead, and rituals that define the ...
    Related: african, african american, african american culture, african art, american, american community, american culture
  • Analysis Of The New Singles - 685 words
    Analysis Of The New Singles The article that will be evaluated in this particular essay is taken from Newsweeks Society and Arts (dating August 14,2000), which is titled as The New Singles and it is written by Carla Power in cooperation with Antonia Francis, in Paris and Stefan Theil, in Berlin. As it can be understood from the title it is about the people in Europe, who prefer living alone. Throughout the article, different lifestyles and different choices of people, who are living alone, are reflected. While doing that, the reasons and the outcomes of living alone are given with some additional information including, statistics and research results. The article shows that there is a certai ...
    Related: living conditions, business culture, social issues, tough, accurate
  • Applied Nostalgia - 2,252 words
    ... an apocalypse not. The 1950s and the 1990s are utterly and completely different. The 1950s was a post-war time, where utterly irreproducible affects kept mom at home. The 1990s is a technology laden information society, where media pries into corners and brings problems into greater light including violence, rape, birth control, and AIDS. The amount of nuclear families decreased (Two 1), yet the cause for the dissolve of the family outweighs the difficulties, the equalization of women in the work force. No longer do mothers rely on the male's income, they can survive on their own. Their ties of help flutter free and the American women becomes free since the American ideals put forth in ...
    Related: sexual education, single parent, employee loyalty, educating, guide
  • Baby Boom Vs Three Men And A Baby - 1,723 words
    Baby Boom Vs. Three Men And A Baby The two movies I have selected to review are Baby Boom starring Diane Keaton, and Three Men and a Baby starring Tom Selleck, Steve Guttenberg and Ted Danson. They both came out in 1987 and although they are similar in topic, they were received very differently by critics and audiences. The basic plot of both films is as follows: Career or party-minded person inherits or is left by a former lover a baby girl. At first they dont want her and dont know what to do with her, but soon they fall in love with her and adjust/adapt their lifestyles to fit their new daughter. This generalization may be the basic plot of the films, but when the details come out, they t ...
    Related: baby boom, boom, nuclear family, different ways, soft
  • Can Sociology Be Value Free - 1,286 words
    Can Sociology Be Value Free? Value neutrality is a term used by Weber to indicate the necessary objectivity researchers need when investigating problems in the social sciences. Weber also cautioned against the making of value judgements which coincide with the orientation or motives of the researcher. It is important to note that although Weber believed that value neutrality was the aim of research, his view was that no science is fundamentally neutral and its observational language is never independent of the way individuals see phenomena and the questions they ask about them (Morrison 1995 pp.267, 347) It is this link between the researcher's theoretical stand and the methods adopted that ...
    Related: sociology, twentieth century, research process, scientific method, dissimilar
  • Can Sociology Be Value Free - 1,275 words
    ... er a disinterested academic one...the tradition thus has a double intent; on the one hand it engages in the primary sociological task of describing and documenting the 'state of society', on the other hand it addresses itself to central social and political issues (Halsey et al 1980 in McNeill 1990 p12) The conclusion that can be drawn from this is that there never has been a value free sociology, just an attempt to merge a value choice with objective research methods (McNeil 1990 p13) During the twentieth century the positivist approach that fostered the hypothetico-deductive mode, although rational in manner came to be seen as coldly logical. In favour, especially since the 1960s, has ...
    Related: free press, sociology, total value, research study, society and culture
  • Citizen Competence In A Democracy - 1,517 words
    Citizen Competence In A Democracy Citizens tend to make political decisions that are affected by their understanding of political institutions. People with a full understanding of political institutions have conceptual maps of the world that are less uncertain. Without this knowledge people see economic and social change as more uncertain and unexplainable. Any discussion of citizen competence must acknowledge the importance of political knowledge in helping people to evaluate politicians and policies. Citizens limited knowledge of political institutions and the effect on their world-views are particularly strong because Americans have little knowledge about their own government and the inst ...
    Related: citizen, competence, democracy, role playing, national survey
  • Class V Caste System - 1,311 words
    Class V. Caste System A Class vs. a Caste System In any country's history, a high stage of social development is reached only when the main social divisions are formed. "The caste system penetrates the Hindu society to a level unknown elsewhere. It plays some part in other civilizations but in India it has invaded the whole. It is in this sense that we may speak of the caste system as a phenomenon peculiar to India" (Pocock 27). The class system of the United States and the caste system of India share common characteristics but, at the same time, they different in many ways. A caste system rigidly restricted occupationally, socially, members may not marry outside the caste. Caste system deva ...
    Related: caste, caste system, hindu caste, indian caste, working class
  • Class, State, And Crime: Social Conflict Perspective - 1,129 words
    Class, State, And Crime: Social Conflict Perspective Michael Merchant Class: Social Psychology Class, State, and Crime : Social Conflict Perspective How does Class, state ,and social controls within a capitalistic society lead to increase crime due to the criminal laws and criminal justice system imposed on the lower middle class. Social conflict theory is the only one out of the vast number of criminology theories that deals directly with this problem. From out of it's Marxist roots arose a theory which challenges the way in which today's society views it's legal system and the implications it has on it's working class citizens. The nature and purpose of social conflict theories is to exami ...
    Related: conflict perspective, conflict theory, social change, social class, social conditions, social conflict, social control
  • Criminology - 1,619 words
    Criminology Criminology One of the biggest issues in America today is crime. It is a large problem that continues to erode our country economically as well as morally. Because of the vastness of the problem, many have speculated what the cause for crime may be in hopes that a solution will be found. Many believe that a bad family life, location of residence, and poverty hold a few of the answers to why an individual becomes involved in criminal activity. Crime has been a major problem addressed in every presidential campaign for about three decades. This is because the American people are sick of the ever growing problem and seem to be voting for whoever claims to do the most about it. Major ...
    Related: criminology, family member, national bank, fiscal year, reform
  • Culture Of Poverty - 375 words
    Culture Of Poverty Culture of Poverty The culture of poverty was introduced or was popularized by Oscar Lewis while studying poor families in Mexico and Puerto Rican families San Juan and New York. The theory maintains that culturally based attitudes or predisposition such as present-mindedness and obsessive-consumption are the major barriers to economic mobility for many of the poor. Lewis theory likewise implies that this is not a short-lived financial predicament for the poor, but a way of life bolstered by the hopelessness of accomplishing even minor economic goals. Lewis argues that there are certain cultural characteristics among the poor in industrial capitalist societies. Lewis and o ...
    Related: poverty, life cycle, puerto rican, social science, mobility
  • Delinquints - 980 words
    Delinquints Remember doing something mischievous or wrong when you were a kid and getting the label "delinquent" slapped on you ? Did you ever wonder what it meant ? That is what my topic for today is . . . juvenile delinquency. In this report I will: define juvenile delinquency, give the extent of juvenile delinquency, give some suggestions on what causes juvenile delinquency, and what is being done in various communities to deal with this growing problem. The legal term juvenile delinquent was established so that young lawbreakers could avoid the disgrace of being classified in legal records as criminals. Juvenile delinquency laws were designed to provide treatment, rather than punishment, ...
    Related: juvenile delinquents, work skills, delinquent behavior, guidance, police
  • Deviance - 388 words
    Deviance Deviance Not everyone behaves in the way society expects or approves. Since children they start to change the values of their own parents. As adults, they may choose entirely different ways of life. In all societies, there are people who dream of being what they aren't. Sometimes they decide to challenge the system, to push out beyond the limits established by law or tradition. Political radicals, school dropouts, women who refuse the role of homemaker or mother. They are willing be labeled troublemakers or simply, deviants because they believe that society's norms should change. Professional thieves, and bank robbers also violate norms, but their deviance is not usually based on a ...
    Related: deviance, methods used, human society, school dropouts, reward
  • Deviant Behavior - 1,203 words
    Deviant Behavior A person would be considered to be acting deviantly in society if they are violating what the significant social norm in that particular culture is. What causes humans to act certain ways is a disputed topic among researchers for some time now. There are three types of researchers that have tried to answer this question. There is the psychological answer, biological answer, and the sociological answer. With all of the studies that have been performed, no one group has come up with an exact reason to why people behave deviantly. Although, sociologists theories have not been disproved as often as the psychologists and biologists theories because their experiments are too hard ...
    Related: deviant, deviant behavior, more harm, sociological perspective, supportive
  • Deviant Behavior - 1,188 words
    ... ow much their peers and media influence them to go against the norms. Although, once a person is labeled deviant they continue to respond to society as if they are. This aspect of deviance is called the Labeling Theory. They are sociologists who seek to find why certain acts are defined as criminal, and others are not. They also question how and why certain people become defined as a criminal or deviant. The acts that they perform, in this idea, are not significant to the criminals, but it is the social reaction to them that is (Overview 1). The response and label from other individuals in society, such as peers, are how the individuals view themselves. When a person does a deviant act t ...
    Related: criminal behavior, delinquent behavior, deviant, deviant behavior, york harper
  • Discovery Of Being - 1,162 words
    Discovery Of Being It seems as though every Sociologist creates his or her own definition of Anxiety. Each definition of Anxiety being ghastly different, however, tying back to three common situations: Fear, Encounters with primary groups, secondary groups, and the public, and Anxiety towards Self-Growth. In analyzing Rollo May's "The Discovery of Being," we find that May incorporates many different definitions of these situations from other Sociologists, as well as ties in many of his own thoughts and ideas. Also at times, May disregards strongly other Sociologist's views on these situations, creating an interesting and unique view of society and Psychology. In this analysis of "The Discove ...
    Related: discovery, vice president, different situations, self concept, secondary
  • Emile Durkheim - 841 words
    Emile Durkheim Emile Durkheim was born in the eastern French province of Lorraine on April 15, 1858. He was the s on of a rabbi and descending from a long line of rabbis, he decided early that he would follow the family tradition and become a rabbi himself. He studied Hebrew, the Old Testament, and the Talmud, while following the regular course of in secular schools. He soon turned away from all religious involvement, though purposely not from interest in religious phenomena, and became a freethinker, or non-believer. At about the time of his graduation he decided that he would dedicate himself to the scientific study of society. Since sociology was not a subject either at the secondary scho ...
    Related: durkheim, emile, emile durkheim, scientific study, falls apart
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