Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: sociocultural

  • 27 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • Jean And Gerhard Lenski, In Their Theory Of Sociocultural Evolution, Describe Five - 866 words
    Jean and Gerhard Lenski, in their theory of sociocultural evolution, describe five different types of societies, separated by their technologies. They are the hunting and gathering societies, the horticultural and pastoral societies, the agrarian societies, the industrial societies, and the post-industrial societies. Which of these societies would I prefer? I will argue that the post-industrial society is favorable to the other four societies. Compared to the post-industrial society, an individual in the hunting and gathering society consumes a great deal of time, energy, and thought, collecting and hunting for food. Most of these societies today generally live in marginal areas where resour ...
    Related: jean, sociocultural, social stratification, political change, rare
  • Sociocultural Aspects - 3,060 words
    Sociocultural Aspects At the beginning of this semester, I went into a classroom without the intentions of it having any impact of my life. What I did not know was that this course held not only a vision for the future but also answers to my past. Growing up, I was influenced by a society that was inhabited almost entirely by whites. For that reason only, I have been completely unaware of any bias or unfair treatment to minority and female students. Because of this upbringing, I found many incidences discussed in class quite unbelievable. However, my views on our society and the educational system have been broadened which leads me to believe that the teachers of the future now have the key ...
    Related: sociocultural, female students, video games, middle school, enormous
  • Sociocultural Aspects - 3,245 words
    ... e that she did not say a word to me about being late. I can honestly say that my best friend Erin always walked into lass with me late and a word was never spoken to us about being late. Mrs. Lightfoot always smiled and treated us like we were there early with our homework out ready to go over it. That was hardly the case and I could never understand why she was so harsh on the boys et so lenient with the girls. Now, four years later, my brother is in her English class and he told me stories about how she is so hateful to him and his friends who are all male. I told my brother, Matthew, to tell her that he is my little brother and see what kind of response she gets. So, thinking that if ...
    Related: sociocultural, more important, social issues, grand slam, baseball
  • Towards Innovation - 1,518 words
    "Towards Innovation" The world today is experiencing the most rapid pace of change in its history. The purpose of this essay is to discuss what organizational structure is suitable in the business circumstances of today. This essay will argue that 'the environment of the 21st century is such, that to be effective, organizations are tending towards less formalized structures than used in the past'. To support this argument, firstly organizations will be defined, and then the properties that make an organization effective will be identified. Next organizational structure will be appraised, and what constitutes business environment will be established. Finally the influences globalisation and t ...
    Related: innovation, information exchange, work activities, business environment, workforce
  • Aids In Africa - 1,109 words
    Aids In Africa As recently as 1990, there were some regions of the world that had remained relatively unscathed by AIDS. Today, however, there is not a single country around the world which has wholly escaped the AIDS epidemic. As the epidemic has matured, some of the developed nations which were hard hit by the epidemic in the 1980s such as the United States have reported a slowing in the rate of new infections and a stabilization among existing cases with lower mortality rates and an extension of post-diagnosis lifespan. However, despite the changing face of the global AIDS pandemic, one factor remains unchanged: no region of the world bears a higher AIDS-related burden than sub-Saharan Af ...
    Related: africa, aids, aids epidemic, east africa, saharan africa, sub-saharan africa, west africa
  • Alcoholism - 2,059 words
    Alcoholism alcoholism Definitions and causal factors of alcoholism Alcoholism consists of a repetitive intake of alcoholic beverages to an extent that the drinker is harmed. The harm may be physical or mental; it may also be social or economic. Implicit in the conception of alcoholism as a disease is the idea that the person experiencing repeated or long-lasting injury from his drinking would alter his behaviour if he could. His failure to do so shows that he cannot help himself, that he has lost control over drinking. This conception incorporates the idea of addiction or dependence. Formal definitions of alcoholism vary according to the point of view of the definer. A simplistic, old-fashio ...
    Related: alcoholism, affective disorder, social factors, world war ii, relation
  • Anorexia Nervosa - 1,685 words
    Anorexia Nervosa Eating disorders are a cause for serious concern from both a psychological and a nutritional point of view. They are often a complex expression of underlying problems with identity and self concept. These disorders often stem from traumatic experiences and are influenced by society`s attitudes toward beauty and worth (Eating Disorder Resource Center, 1997). Biological factors, family issues, and psychological make-up may be what people who develop eating disorders are responding to. Anyone can be affected by eating disorders, regardless of their socioeconomic background (Eating Disorder Resource Center, 1997). Anorexia nervosa is one such disorder characterized by extreme we ...
    Related: anorexia, anorexia nervosa, nervosa, body image, serious concern
  • Chicken Soup For The Soul - 1,429 words
    Chicken Soup For The Soul Anthropology may be dissected into four main perspectives, firstly physical or biological anthropology, which is an area of study concerned with human evolution and human adaptation. Its main components are human paleontology, the study of our fossil records, and human genetics, which examines the ways in which human beings differ from each other. Also adopted are aspects of human ecology, ethnology, demography, nutrition, and environmental physiology. From the physical anthropologist we learn the capabilities for bearing culture that distinguish us from other species. Secondly archaeology, which follows from physical anthropology, reassembles the evolution of cultu ...
    Related: chicken, soup, social relationships, cultural difference, achieving
  • Cultural Comparisons Ethnocentrism - 1,069 words
    Cultural Comparisons Ethnocentrism Culture Cultural comparisons Ethnocentrism Ethnocentrism is the name given to a tendency to interpret or evaluate other cultures in terms of one's own. This tendency has been, perhaps, more prevalent in modern nations than among preliterate tribes. The citizens of a large nation, especially in the past, have been less likely to observe people in another nation or culture than have been members of small tribes who are well acquainted with the ways of their culturally diverse neighbours. Thus, the American tourist could report that Londoners drive on the wrong side of the street or an Englishman might find some customs on the Continent queer or boorish, merel ...
    Related: cultural relativism, ethnocentrism, culturally diverse, wind power, acquisition
  • Cultural Comparisons Ethnocentrism - 1,035 words
    ... ermine culture change. The Fuegians living at the southern tip of South America, as viewed by Charles Darwin on his voyage on the Beagle, lived in a very cold, harsh environment but were virtually without both clothing and dwellings. Diffusion Culture is contagious, as a prominent anthropologist once remarked, meaning that customs, beliefs, tools, techniques, folktales, ornaments, and so on may diffuse from one people or region to another. To be sure, a culture trait must offer some advantage, some utility or pleasure, to be sought and accepted by a people. (Some anthropologists have assumed that basic features of social structure, such as clan organization, may diffuse, but a sounder vi ...
    Related: cultural development, cultural evolution, ethnocentrism, modern europe, ancient egypt
  • Culture In International Marketing And Buyer Hehavior - 1,206 words
    Culture In International Marketing And Buyer Hehavior Index Introduction Characteristics of culture International Marketing and buyer behavior Examples of Cultural Blunders Made by International Marketers The Culture Sensitivity of Markets The Development of Global Culture Cultural Analysis of Global Markets Cross- cultural analysis Conclusion References Introduction Culture is the learned ways of group living and the group's responses to various stimuli. It is also the total way of life and thinking patterns that are passed from generation to generation. It encompasses norms, values, customs, art, and beliefs. Culture is the patterns of behavior and thinking that people living in social gro ...
    Related: buyer, buyer behavior, common culture, global culture, international marketing, marketing, marketing manager
  • Culture In International Marketing And Buyer Hehavior - 1,137 words
    ... s are all dictated by culture. Culture prescribes the manner in which people satisfy their desires. Not surprisingly, consumption habits very greatly. The consumption of beef provides a good illustration. Some Chinese do not consume beef at all, believing that it is improper to eat cattle that work on farms, thus helping to provide foods such as rice and vegetables. The Culture Sensitivity of Markets: Markets can be divided into consumer markets and industrial markets. Consumer markets can be further subdivided into durable goods markets and nondurable goods markets. A further profitable distinction in the international market place is to divide durable goods into technological products ...
    Related: buyer, buyer behavior, global culture, international marketing, local culture, marketing, marketing process
  • Eating Disorders - 1,091 words
    Eating Disorders It is not surprising that eating disorders are on the increase due to the value society places on being thin. In modern Western culture, women are given the message at a very young age that in order to be happy and successful, they must be thin. Every time you walk into a store you are surrounded by the images of emaciated models that appear on the front cover of fashion magazines. Women are constantly bombarded with advertisements catering to what is considered desirable. Thousands of women and girls are starving themselves this very minute trying to attain what the fashion industry considers to be the ideal waif-like figure. During this paper I will mainly be discussing th ...
    Related: disorders, eating disorder, eating disorders, economic conditions, fashion industry
  • Eating Disorders - 1,113 words
    ... ut external appearances including physical ones. To accomplish these goals, family members often deny negative feelings and tend to attribute their problems to other people. In "Unbearable Weight: Feminism, Western Culture, and the Body" statistically proven data suggests that among eating disorder patients there are significant differences of cohesion and expressiveness. Cohesion and expressiveness are the degree of unity among family members. Comparing with normally functioning families, those with eating disorder patients scored lower on cohesiveness and expressiveness. (54) Fourth, and most importantly, visual media appears to have an effect on the frequency of eating disorders. Afte ...
    Related: binge eating, disorders, eating disorder, eating disorders, healthy eating
  • Female Genital Mutilation - 1,588 words
    Female Genital Mutilation Female Genital Mutilation The practice of female genital mutilation, also known as female circumcision, occurs throughout the world, but it is most common in Africa. Female genital mutilation is a tradition and social custom to keep a young girl pure and a married woman faithful. In Africa it is practiced in the majority of the continent including Kenya, Nigeria, Mali, Upper Volta, Ivory Coast, Egypt, Mozambique and Sudan. It is a cross-cultural and cross-religious ritual, which is performed by Muslims, Coptic Christians, Protestants, Catholics and members of various indigenous groups. Female genital mutilation is usually performed on girls before they reach puberty ...
    Related: female circumcision, female genital mutilation, genital, genital mutilation, mutilation
  • Gifted And Disable - 1,146 words
    Gifted And Disable Have you ever wanted to be smarter? Wished that you had all the gifts and abilities that are associated with being a "super human genius"? Coveted the inconceivable abilities of masterminds such as Galileo and Einstein? Throughout the history of man it has been these kinds of great minds that deviate from the current method of thinking, in turn creating new lines of reason and more holistic understandings of the world around us. We label them "gifted and talented" but they are truly our inventors, our leaders, our Mozarts and Michelangelos. In spite of this they are at risk for extinction. Presently, the sociocultural surrounding in which our children grow do not cater to ...
    Related: disable, gifted children, gifted education, gifted students, term effects
  • Hmong In America - 604 words
    Hmong In America The concept of culture can be defined as an orchestrated integration of unconsciously learned behavior patterns that are characteristic of a group of people. Many varying constituents compose a particular culture. This causes many different cultures to deviate from one another greatly. Such components as ethnicity, life experiences, values, beliefs, religion, time orientations and socializations are all examples of these aspects. (Warner and Mochel, p.4) Because of the great differences many cultures exhibit between one another, within situations where cross-cultural interactions take place, many discrepancies, disagreements, and difficulties arise. These situations are beco ...
    Related: america, america today, hmong, different cultures, health care
  • How Do Psychologists Attempt To Explain The Origins Of Prejudice - 1,390 words
    How Do Psychologists Attempt To Explain The Origins Of Prejudice? HOW DO PSYCHOLOGISTS ATTEMPT TO EXPLAIN THE ORIGINS OF PREJUDICE? DO THEY OFFER SOCIETY ANY HOPE THAT IT MAY BE REDUCED? BY JON SALECLEMENTS. Ethnocentrism is the tendency to assume that one's culture or way of life is superior to all others. Prejudice is a negative attitude toward an entire category of individuals. Discrimination is behaviour that excludes all members of a group from certain rights, opportunities or privileges. A range of international events have recently focused attention on the issue of prejudice; increasing ethno-nationalistic tensions in former Eastern block countries, racial conflict in the Middle East, ...
    Related: prejudice, psychologists, psychodynamic approach, individual differences, reduction
  • Human Growth And Development - 1,207 words
    Human Growth And Development Human Growth and Development 1. abusive relationship: when one partner in a relationship becomes violent or aggressive toward the other. 2. accommodation: according to Piaget, changing existing knowledge based on new knowledge. 3. achievement status: identity status in which adolescents have explored alternative identities and are now secure in their chosen identities. 4. active euthanasia: deliberate ending of someones life. 5. activities of daily living (ADLs): self-care tasks such as eating, bathing, toileting, walking, or dressing. 6. activity: dimension of temperament defined by the tempo and vigor of a childs activity. 7. adaptation level: area where enviro ...
    Related: human growth, human values, life cycle, life sciences, amniocentesis
  • Ireland - 1,371 words
    ... the Irish were to blame for their own poverty, starvation, and death; the English, who were really to blame, could go on living without guilt or regret. IV. The starvation influenced the history of the United States During the years of starvation, many Irish fled their homeland and came to the United States. In 1851, two hundred fifty thousand Irishmen boarded ships headed for America. One main draw for immigration into the United States was that many Irish had relatives already living in the U.S. Fares were inexpensive, it that was known as the land of opportunity, and it was free from British law, making it Evan more attractive. After the Civil War came the industrialization of the Un ...
    Related: ireland, northern ireland, school system, governmental policies, objectively
  • 27 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2