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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: social workers

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  • Adoptive V Birth Parents Legal Rights - 938 words
    Adoptive V. Birth Parents' Legal Rights Adoptive v. Birth Parents' Rights This issue hits home with me, I am adopted. I believe that a child's parents are the people who raise them and take care of them. I do not believe that birth parents have any rights to their children after the child has been adopted and living with their adoptive parents. The biological parents made a decision when they put the child up for adoption, for whatever the reason may have been. Just because they feel that their lives are more stable and together does not give them the right to rip a child from the only parents that child knows. By doing this the biological parents destroy not only the life of the child but a ...
    Related: adoptive, legal issues, legal rights, child custody, traditional values
  • Aggression - 2,625 words
    Aggression Aggression 1 Running Head: AGGRESSION Aggression: Dealing with the Aspects that we are faced with Day in and Day Out Aggression 2 Abstract We live in a society where aggressive acts happen every day, but do we really know what causes it? How can we help ourselves and others to understand what aggression is? First off, we need to define aggression, tell it's causes and effects and determine the best way to deal with it. For example, aggression can be positive or negative, accidental or intended and physical or mental. Aggression is a continuing behavior in our world today and I feel that it is very important that we try to start controlling it now. Aggression 3 Aggression is a crit ...
    Related: aggression, human aggression, social environment, social psychology, expresses
  • Aggression - 2,627 words
    ... Running Head: AGGRESSION Aggression: Dealing with the Aspects that we are faced with Day in and Day Out Natalie Grow York College Aggression 2 Abstract We live in a society where aggressive acts happen every day, but do we really know what causes it? How can we help ourselves and others to understand what aggression is? First off, we need to define aggression, tell it's causes and effects and determine the best way to deal with it. For example, aggression can be positive or negative, accidental or intended and physical or mental. Aggression is a continuing behavior in our world today and I feel that it is very important that we try to start controlling it now. Aggression 3 Aggression is ...
    Related: aggression, human aggression, social psychology, over time, negatively
  • Aids Related Stigma Since The Appearance Of Aids In The Late Seventies And Early Eighties, The Disease Has Had Attached To It - 1,545 words
    AIDS Related Stigma Since the appearance of AIDS in the late seventies and early eighties, the disease has had attached to it a significant social stigma. This stigma has manifested itself in the form of discrimination, avoidance and fear of people living with AIDS (PLWAs). As a result, the social implications of the disease have been extended from those of other life threatening conditions to the point at which PLWAs are not only faced with a terminal illness but also social isolation and constant discrimination throughout society. Various explanations have been suggested as to the underlying causes of this stigmatization. Many studies point to the relationship the disease has with deviant ...
    Related: aids, aids epidemic, early years, seventies, stigma
  • Aids Related Stigma Since The Appearance Of Aids In The Late Seventies And Early Eighties, The Disease Has Had Attached To It - 1,516 words
    ... lthough some things have changed and laws have been passed, the effects if stigma are still prevalent. Many people still express feelings of fear and hostility towards PLWAs (OHare, et al., 1996). Most of the negative attitudes felt and expressed are irrational but the effects can be devastating. One effect is peoples tendency to avoid all contact with PLWAs which contributes to social isolation. Also, even though legislation has been passed, discrimination still does exist. When asked about the treatment he received at Montreal General Hospital, an HIV positive patient explained that AIDS discrimination is far from being eradicated and that PLWAs are treated in a very negative fashion i ...
    Related: aids, seventies, stigma, issues surrounding, care system
  • Alcoholism - 2,013 words
    ... times increased consumption of alcohol are cited in evidence. But these data invariably fail to take account of changes in availability or use of facilities, changes in admission or diagnostic policies, or changes in the source of beverages--for example, from unrecorded to recorded supplies. In the Soviet Union a change in the internal political situation with the death of Stalin resulted in a shift from official denial that any significant problem of alcoholism existed to an outcry that its prevalence was widespread and serious, though no statistics were provided. Treatment of alcoholism The various treatments of alcoholism may be classified as physiological, psychological, and social. ...
    Related: alcoholism, carbon dioxide, psychoactive drugs, alcoholics anonymous aa, therapy
  • Alcoholism Is A Wideranging And Complex Disease That Heavily Plagues Society Drinking Is Defined As The Consumption Of A Liqu - 1,012 words
    ... igestive enzymes, which can irritate the stomach wall, producing heartburn, nausea, gastritis, and ulcers. The stomach of a chronic drinker loses the ability to adequately move food and expel it into the duodenum, leaving some food always in the stomach, causing sluggish digestion and vomiting. Alcohol may also inflame the small and large intestine (Overview 4). Moderate daily drinking may be good for the heart, but for many the risks outweigh the benefits. Even one binge may produce irregular heartbeats, and an alcohol abuser experience increased risk of high blood pressure, heart attacks, heart arrhythmia, and heart disease. Alcohol may cause cardiomyopathy (a disease of the heart musc ...
    Related: alcoholism, consumption, drinking, heart disease, heavily, legal drinking
  • Alcoholismnature Or Nuture - 1,645 words
    Alcoholism-Nature Or Nuture? INTRODUCTION: Alcoholism can affect anyone. It has enormous costs as it pertains to societies, families, and individuals. It is not prejudicial towards any race, color, sex, religion, or economic level. Although we do have ideas as to what alcoholism is, what we do not know is the exact cause(s) of this problem. Researchers are continually seeking answers to the long-standing nature versus nurture debate. Different views are split between a biological paradigm and a physchological paradigm. No one explanation seems to be better than another is. I will present views of the effects alcoholism has on society and an insight to the factors that serve to fuel the natur ...
    Related: different views, social customs, urban areas, regulate, health
  • Amazing Grace - 1,068 words
    Amazing Grace Within the next few pages here I intend to address two issues. First I will try to give a personal review of what I saw this book to hold, and second I will try explain the revelence which this book has to the field of Public Administration. First try to picture children in a slum where the squalor in their homes is just as bad as that which is in the streets. Where prostitution is rampant, thievery a common place and murder and death a daily occurrence. Crack-cocaine and heroin are sold in corner markets, and the dead eyes of men and women wandering about aimlessly in the streets of Mott Haven are all to common., Their bodies riddled with disease, disease which seems to contro ...
    Related: amazing, grace, men and women, york city, mott
  • Analysis Of The Underlying Social Psychology - 1,161 words
    ... ople rescued others for various reasons. Some were motivated by a sense of morality. Others had a relationship with a particular person or group and thus, felt a sense of obligation. Some were politically driven and were adamantly opposed to Hitler. Other rescuers were involved at work as diplomats, nurses, social workers, and doctors, and thus were conditioned to continue their involvement beyond their professional obligation. This is where cognitive dissonance comes into effect in this instance. These people were raised to help, it was a part of their moral fabric. To go against that learned belief would cause dissonance, therefore, these people had it woven into them to rescue, to hel ...
    Related: psychology, social animal, social psychology, social workers, underlying
  • Anorexia Nervosa - 1,132 words
    Anorexia Nervosa A normal female takes a stroll down the streets of Manhattan and ends up at Times Square, probably one of the most colorful places on earth, which also has an abundant number of advertisements. As this female looks up at the pictures, she can see a Calvin Klein ad. The image portrays people who are the idols of our youth; young, thin, beautiful men and women. These young people depict the"ideal" body. As this female walks, she begins to notice her own physical attributes and wonders what it would take for her to look like that Calvin Klein model. Despite the fact that the greatest majority of us could never attain these physiques, many, especially young women, deeply desire ...
    Related: anorexia, anorexia nervosa, nervosa, mental health, middle class
  • Anorexia Nervosa - 1,600 words
    Anorexia Nervosa In American society women are given the message starting from a very young age that in order to be successful and happy, they must be thin. Eating disorders are on the rise, it is not surprising given the value which society places on being thin. Television and magazine advertising that show the image of glamorous and thin model are everywhere. Thousands of teenage girls are starving themselves daily in an effort to attain what the fashion industry considers to be the "ideal" figure. An average female model weighs 23% less than the recommended weight for a woman. Maintaining a weight 20% below your expected body weight fits the criteria for the emotional eating disorder know ...
    Related: anorexia, anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, nervosa, blood sugar
  • Attachment Theory - 1,027 words
    Attachment Theory Attachment Theory Attachment or bonding is the developing relationship established between a primary caregiver, usually the mother, and her child. Attachment behaviors begin early in life. This narrow age limit is often called the critical period. This trusting relationship developed in infancy forms the foundation for a child's development. If a child has a secure attachment, he will grow up to view the world as a safe place and will be able to develop other emotions. It has become more and more apparent that a healthy attachment is most important in human development. Why do some children survive and even rebound in the face of adversity? Some children are able to adapt a ...
    Related: attachment, attachment theory, social workers, individual development, bonding
  • Bowlbys Deprivation - 1,480 words
    Bowlby's Deprivation In his hypothesis, Bowlby believed that an infants failure to attach to a primary caregiver would have long term effects. This essay will attempt to evaluate Bowlbys deprivation hypothesis. Firstly, the terms attachment and deprivation will be defined. Following that, a full definition of the hypothesis will be made, and then an attempt will be made to describe and understand the studies and period of history that lead to Bowlbys ideas and the influence they generated. A full evaluation will be made of his deprivation hypothesis, including detailed criticisms of his theory. Finally, conclusions will be drawn to show if Bowlbys deprivation hypothesis can still retain any ...
    Related: deprivation, world health, mental health, human behaviour, criticism
  • Careers And Colleges - 1,660 words
    Careers And Colleges Research Project: Careers and Colleges It is difficult for first time job hunters to have realistic ideas about how to profit from their skills. This is why it is important to investigate what career you may be interested in and what colleges will enable you to excell in that career. The profession that I am interested into going into is an elementary school teacher. Fordham University and New York University are two colleges that offer excellent elementary education programs. Throughout this report I will be discussing information related to the career as well as information dealing with the colleges. Career: Elementary School Teacher Work Description School teachers at ...
    Related: careers, social workers, early years, national survey, administrative
  • Child Abluse - 1,980 words
    Child Abluse 1 What is Child Abuse? By definition, child abuse is the deliberate and willful injury of a child by a caretaker hitting, beating with an object, slamming against a wall, even killing. It involves active, hostile, aggressive treatment. The key word in the definition of child abuse is deliberate. Why would anyone physically harm a child? The physical destruction of a child is the extreme reaction of parents to the stress of having children. Most people are not aware of the fact that deliberately hitting a child is considered a felony in all fifty states. Abuse of children is more common than most people realize. At least one out of five adult women and one out of every ten adult ...
    Related: child abuse, child pornography, child sexual abuse, prevent child abuse, young child
  • Child Abuse Laws - 1,198 words
    ... sonable care in hiring also applies to the selection of volunteers, since the purpose of this rule is to assign responsibility for injuries to third persons. A notable case out of Virginia deals directly with the issue of liability for the negligence of a volunteer. In "Infant C. v. Boy Scouts of America, Inc." (391 S.E. 2d 322(Va.1990)), a child and his parents sued both the national and local Boy scouts office for negligently selecting and retaining a volunteer scoutmaster with a criminal record for sexually assaulting scouts in another state, who allegedly molested the child plaintiff. The courts inquiry turned on the selection process itself and found that the evidence supported the ...
    Related: abuse, abuse prevention, child abuse, law enforcement, megan's law
  • Chile Political Parties And Organizations - 1,401 words
    ... ition parties to propose far-reaching amendments to the constitution. The National Renewal party, however, could not impose its own party president, having to concede the presidential candidacy of the right to the UDI's Bchi. After the 1989 congressional race, the National Renewal party emerged as the dominant party of the right, benefiting strongly from the electoral law and electing six senators and twenty-nine deputies. Its strength in the Senate meant that the Aylwin government had to compromise with the National Renewal party to gain support for key legislative and constitutional measures. The National Renewal party saw much of its support wane in the wake of party scandals involvin ...
    Related: business organization, chile, organizations, political issues, political parties
  • Clinical Psychology - 1,054 words
    Clinical Psychology Clinical Psychology The word psychology can translate to mean "the science of the soul." Since Aristotle, psychology has become both a science and a profession. As a profession, it is the application of understanding people and their behavior to help solve human problems (Careers, 1993). A psychologist usually concentrates on one specialty that is of particular interest. There are many different fields of psychology to study. Clinical psychologists work with people with emotional and mental problems (Career Discovery, 1997). A clinical psychologist basically prevents, evaluates, and treats mental and emotional disorders in individuals. "Disorders range from minor problems ...
    Related: applied psychology, clinical, clinical practice, clinical psychology, general psychology, health psychology, psychology
  • Coming Out Of Gay Men And Lesbians - 1,111 words
    ... sexual gratification from a partner of the same sex (Clark, 1997). This lifestyle is not considered the norm, society and family members usually frown it upon. They have also had to try and overcome hostility from family members when they refuse to accept their sexual orientation. It has become easier for them to keep their choices a secret and do not flaunt their preference in public or on their jobs in fear of being ridiculed. They feel that their private lives should be kept behind close doors. By not "coming out" they can keep their jobs, housing, dignity, and take advantage of rights given to all citizens in society. But many have chosen to fight back and demand equal rights and tr ...
    Related: lesbian women, ethical standards, spiritual experience, harcourt brace, resource
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