Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: social support

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  • Acceptance Of Homosexual Marriage - 1,033 words
    ... es. If gay couples were allowed to marry, it would set a bad example for children, and could spell the downfall of one of the cornerstones of our society. After all, whats next? Legalizing polygamy? Marriage between brothers? (Hetter 28-31) Hetter displays one belief of a large group of individuals who confuse what is right, and fair for society as a whole, with what is based on her one-sided religious beliefs. It is very difficult for some people to accept a change in things that differ from their everyday life and the way they were brought up. If those individuals could look at same-sex marriage open-mindedly they could see that they have been withholding, a precious right that could s ...
    Related: acceptance, gay marriage, homosexual, homosexual marriage, same-sex marriage
  • Alcohol And The Effects On Behavior - 1,596 words
    Alcohol And The Effects On Behavior Alcohol and The Effects on Behavior The articles in which I reviewed dealt with alcoholism and the many different effects it has on behavior. The purpose for each experiment differs, but they all deal whit alcohol and the effects of its behavior. In each of the articles used to complete this research a comparison was mead between people who had been affected by alcoholism to people who had not. The reason for this was to see if alcohol had any effect on an individuals behavior. In the first study which was done by Wright et. Al, they tested to see if non-adult children of alcoholics (ACAs) who were college students differ from nonclinical ACA college stude ...
    Related: alcohol, alcohol consumption, drinking behavior, first year, social support
  • Australian Welfare System - 1,285 words
    Australian Welfare System PART 1 -INTRODUCTION Review Process On 29 September 1999, the Minister for Family and Community Services announced the Government's intention to review the Australian welfare system. The Minister appointed this Reference Group to consult with the community and provide advice to the Government on welfare reform. The Group's terms of reference and membership are at Attachment A to this report. In March this year the Reference Group released an Interim Report that outlined a new framework for a fundamental re-orientation of Australia's social support system and sought feedback from the Australian community. After the Interim Report was released, the Reference Group rec ...
    Related: australian, support system, welfare, welfare reform, welfare system
  • Australian Welfare System - 1,261 words
    ... paid work. In our view it is reasonable to require people with capacity who are work-ready, are available for at least part-time work and have access to job opportunities to seek work that is suitable, having regard to their personal circumstances. We believe it is critical that a broader mutual obligations framework recognises, supports and validates voluntary work and caring, without prescribing any particular form of social participation. Objectives Overall, our goal is to minimise social and economic exclusion. Australias success in doing this will be measured by the following three key outcomes: 1 A significant reduction in the incidence of jobless families and jobless households. 2 ...
    Related: australian, support system, welfare, welfare reform, welfare system
  • Children's Psychological Adjustment To Entry Into Kindergarten - 1,388 words
    Children'S Psychological Adjustment To Entry Into Kindergarten Michael Burkhardt Page 2 From an ecological perspective, early childhood development occurs within the multiple contexts of the home, the school, and the neighborhood, and aspects of these environments can contribute to the development of adjustment problems (Bronfenbrenner, 1979). A child's psychological adjustment to entry into school for the first time can have a significant impact on the level of success achieved later in life. Children rated higher in school adjustment by their elementary school teachers, as a result of improved cognitive development, showed positive attitudes toward school resulting in better school perform ...
    Related: adjustment, children's, entry, kindergarten, psychological, psychological adjustment
  • Crittically Examine The Use Of The Term Community - 1,398 words
    Crittically Examine The Use Of The Term Community Critically examine the use of the term community in the 1990s. The essay should be structured in such a way that it incorporates reference to Social Policy, Legislation and practice issues. Students will be required to make use of theoretical studies, particularly from relevant academic and other sources such as books, journals and relevant publications. The meaning of community is a tricky one. It is used in many different contexts and is a concept that means very different things to different people. A useful starting point is in the book Keywords by Raymond Williams. His research on the word community indicates that it has been part of Eng ...
    Related: community care, community development, community education, community policing, examine
  • Crittically Examine The Use Of The Term Community - 1,380 words
    ... titutionalisation was not acceptable or possible. The traditional social support networks found in the close knit occupational communities were also missing due to the decline of the close knit community. This was taken one step further when in the eighties, the desire to privatise public enterprises and reduce public expenditure, including industrial subsidies led to a rapid decline of manufacturing in the early 1980s and led to historically high levels of unemployment. Which as we have seen weakens a communities social support network. Over the last twenty years the main way social policy has responded to these problems is by encouraging the development of community care initiatives, t ...
    Related: community care, community policing, examine, short term, personal identity
  • Cults - 1,831 words
    Cults On November 18, 1978, in a cleared-out patch of the Guyanese jungle, Reverend Jim Jones ordered the 911 members of his flock to kill themselves by drinking a cyanide potion, and they did. It seems cultists were brainwashed by this megalomaniac Jones, who had named their jungle village after himself and held them as virtual slaves, if not living zombies. Jones himself was found dead. He'd shot himself in the head, or someone else had shot him. Is it plausible that more than nine hundred people took their own lives willingly, simply because he told them to? This paper will examine aspects of certain religious groups around the world that have shocked us with similar types of behavior. Mo ...
    Related: human potential, social support, deviant behavior, cuts, demanding
  • Depressions - 1,978 words
    Depressions Depression: The Sadness Disease In our never-ending quest for happiness in our life, is some of the joy taken away? Have our thoughts for what we always want turned astray? Why has the quest for happiness left us more vulnerable and sad? Are we a society of melancholy people that are all looking for happiness and disappointed with what we find? Leaving us in a state of depression and unstableness. Turning us into not only a society of dismal people, but people that are left spiritless and melancholic? In today's society depression is referred to as the "common cold of the mental health problems." More than 5 percent of Americans have depression, that equates to an astonishing 15 ...
    Related: major depression, treatment of depression, effective treatment, self esteem, illness
  • Domestic Violence: Theory, Effects Interventions - 2,773 words
    ... m establishing a meaningful context for understanding the abuse and may provide, especially for their daughters, a model of passive and ineffective problem solving. Therefore, this passivity can be reflected in school by low academic achievement, school phobia, difficulties in concentration, and social isolation. Mediating Factors It is important to state that much of the research on the effects of children witnessing domestic violence is contingent upon mediating factors, and thus these factors have been taken into consideration when conclusions have been made on the severity of the effects. These mediating factors include the following. Severity of Violence Witnessed Children who witne ...
    Related: crisis intervention, domestic violence, harmful effects, therapeutic intervention, publishing company
  • Handling Stress - 1,014 words
    Handling Stress # This essay is about handling the stress of University studies. We will be looking into many ideas and different peoples views on how to handle stress. I will also be giving my own opinions on how I think stress can be controlled or relieved. The first thing we must do is ask ourselves one very important question, what is stress? WHAT IS STRESS? According to an Australian born physician, Hans Selye (1979), stress is the nonspecific response of the body to any demand made upon it. The body responds in many ways. One is to the loss of blood and the other is to the lack of sleep. Both of these are nonspecific responses, however all demands made on the body evoke generalised, no ...
    Related: handling, manage stress, stress management, more effective, management training
  • Handling Stress - 1,034 words
    ... stress and increasing ones academic performance than the success program. The goals of all these programs are to a) to help students to understand stress and the role it plays in their lives and b) to help students acquire healthy methods of managing their stress. They are there for social support and to give the student or person an increased feeling of self-control. They also help in student developing and emphasise on personal awareness, the development of personal change strategies, and the periodic review of those strategies. These stress management programs or courses are not the only things that help with the controlling or management of stress. There are many other things that s ...
    Related: handling, managing stress, posttraumatic stress, posttraumatic stress disorder, stress disorder, stress management
  • Handling Stress - 1,014 words
    Handling Stress # This essay is about handling the stress of University studies. We will be looking into many ideas and different peoples views on how to handle stress. I will also be giving my own opinions on how I think stress can be controlled or relieved. The first thing we must do is ask ourselves one very important question, what is stress? WHAT IS STRESS? According to an Australian born physician, Hans Selye (1979), stress is the nonspecific response of the body to any demand made upon it. The body responds in many ways. One is to the loss of blood and the other is to the lack of sleep. Both of these are nonspecific responses, however all demands made on the body evoke generalised, no ...
    Related: handling, manage stress, stress management, health promotion, junior college
  • Handling Stress - 1,034 words
    ... stress and increasing ones academic performance than the success program. The goals of all these programs are to a) to help students to understand stress and the role it plays in their lives and b) to help students acquire healthy methods of managing their stress. They are there for social support and to give the student or person an increased feeling of self-control. They also help in student developing and emphasise on personal awareness, the development of personal change strategies, and the periodic review of those strategies. These stress management programs or courses are not the only things that help with the controlling or management of stress. There are many other things that s ...
    Related: handling, managing stress, posttraumatic stress, posttraumatic stress disorder, stress disorder, stress management
  • Handling Stress - 1,017 words
    Handling Stress Handling Stress This essay is about handling the stress of University studies. We will be looking into many ideas and different peoples views on how to handle stress. I will also be giving my own opinions on how I think stress can be controlled or relieved. The first thing we must do is ask ourselves one very important question, what is stress? WHAT IS STRESS? According to an Australian born physician, Hans Selye (1979), stress is the nonspecific response of the body to any demand made upon it. The body responds in many ways. One is to the loss of blood and the other is to the lack of sleep. Both of these are nonspecific responses, however all demands made on the body evoke g ...
    Related: handling, manage stress, stress management, more effective, college students
  • Handling Stress - 1,037 words
    ... ess and increasing ones academic performance than the success program. The goals of all these programs are to a) to help students to understand stress and the role it plays in their lives and b) to help students acquire healthy methods of managing their stress. They are there for social support and to give the student or person an increased feeling of self-control. They also help in student developing and emphasise on personal awareness, the development of personal change strategies, and the periodic review of those strategies. These stress management programs or courses are not the only things that help with the controlling or management of stress. There are many other things that stude ...
    Related: handling, managing stress, posttraumatic stress, posttraumatic stress disorder, stress disorder, stress management
  • Handling Stress - 1,014 words
    Handling Stress # This essay is about handling the stress of University studies. We will be looking into many ideas and different peoples views on how to handle stress. I will also be giving my own opinions on how I think stress can be controlled or relieved. The first thing we must do is ask ourselves one very important question, what is stress? WHAT IS STRESS? According to an Australian born physician, Hans Selye (1979), stress is the nonspecific response of the body to any demand made upon it. The body responds in many ways. One is to the loss of blood and the other is to the lack of sleep. Both of these are nonspecific responses, however all demands made on the body evoke generalised, no ...
    Related: handling, manage stress, stress management, term paper, sympathetic nervous system
  • Handling Stress - 1,034 words
    ... stress and increasing ones academic performance than the success program. The goals of all these programs are to a) to help students to understand stress and the role it plays in their lives and b) to help students acquire healthy methods of managing their stress. They are there for social support and to give the student or person an increased feeling of self-control. They also help in student developing and emphasise on personal awareness, the development of personal change strategies, and the periodic review of those strategies. These stress management programs or courses are not the only things that help with the controlling or management of stress. There are many other things that s ...
    Related: handling, managing stress, posttraumatic stress, posttraumatic stress disorder, stress disorder, stress management
  • Hiv Multiple Bereavement Syndrome - 1,987 words
    Hiv & Multiple Bereavement Syndrome HIV/AIDS and Multiple Bereavement: Is the psychological impact of multiple loss intensified by social factors? "The advent of AIDS has created a new population of people who suffer multiple bereavements as well as threats to their own lives." (Murray-Parkes, 1998, p. xii) The populations most affected by HIV/AIDS live in two geographical locations: the USA and Africa (WHO, 1998) . In 1997 four million people in the Sub-Saharan Africa were newly reported as having seropositive status (WHO, 1998). In North America this figure was 44 thousand (WHO, 1998). Seropositive rates among Gay men in New York City are reported at 36 to 67% (Dean L, 1995). Infection rat ...
    Related: bereavement, multiple, syndrome, financial resources, york city
  • Inclusion - 1,265 words
    Inclusion Inclusion Topic: Inclusion in general education General purpose: To inform Specific purpose: To inform the audience of the aspects of inclusion of disabled students it general education classrooms Thesis: Inclusion is the process by which children and youth with disabilities participate in the same general education classrooms that they would attend if they did not have a disability (usf.edu) Introduction: I. Attention-getting device: According to Deborah Smith of Vanderbilt University, inclusion is a movement that seeks to create schools and other social institutions based on meeting the needs of all learners as well as respecting and learning from each others differences. The inc ...
    Related: inclusion, general purpose, support personnel, classroom environment, sensitivity
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