Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: social structures

  • 30 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • A Critical Analysis - 328 words
    A Critical Analysis A Critical Analysis of Evelyn Waugh's "Bella Fleace Gave a Party" In the introduction to "Bella Fleace Gave a Party", extensive background is revealed to help the reader understand the times in which the character lived. It is a time of enormous change in the political and social structure of these people's lives. An aging socialite is introduced in many direct and indirect characterizations. She is portrayed as a confused and ill-tempered woman shunned by most because of her nature. Conflict arises quickly when a distant cousin, her heir, arrives and covets some books in the house. Bella responds by selling the books, and decides to squander the proceeds on repairing the ...
    Related: critical, critical analysis, social structures, social structure, people's
  • A Postmodern Age - 1,423 words
    A Post-Modern Age? A Post-Modern Age? Introduction: Post-Modernism can be described as a particular style of thought. It is a concept that correlates the emergence of new features and types of social life and economic order in a culture; often called modernization, post-industrial, consumer, media, or multinational capitalistic societies. In Modernity, we have the sense or idea that the present is discontinuous with the past, that through a process of social, technological, and cultural change (either through improvement, that is, progress, or through decline) life in the present is fundamentally different from life in the past. This sense or idea as a world view contrasts with what is commo ...
    Related: postmodern, american market, european history, post modern, depot
  • America Has Seen A Great Amount Of Social Change During The Past Few Decades From They Way We Eat To The Way We Treat Our Cri - 694 words
    America has seen a great amount of social change during the past few decades. From they way we eat to the way we treat our criminals to the safety of our children at school, things have definitely changed. The rash of recent school shootings is a sure sign of the breakdown in parenting and a lack of family values being taught to our children. The highly processed foods that we are eating have led to a nation, which is severely overweight and ill. The Criminal Justice system in this country is a joke; it has been shown to be biased against minorities and the poor. A guilty rich man is known as a free man, while a poor murderer is destined for years on death row. In the Kip Kinkel article we a ...
    Related: america, corporate america, social change, social changes, social structure, social structures
  • American Verna - 1,001 words
    American Verna "The American Verna" Why is that humans were able to practically "take over" their environment and leave all other animal species far behind in the race of survival? Not many would argue that we were able to do so just because we can walk upright and we have unspecialized teeth. In fact, humans are capable of many things that separate us from the animals. Our far most important trait is the ability to analyze and comprehend complex subject matters. From that we can learn, understand and communicate with one another so we could accomplish things as a group, a group which one day became so complex that without structure and laws, chaos would preside. In our times, we see many di ...
    Related: american, american freedom, american system, social mobility, social structures
  • Art Of Living By Thoreau Walden - 1,858 words
    Art Of Living By Thoreau Walden Thoreaus Art of Living In Thoreaus Walden, he explores the art of living by presenting a dichotomy of sojourning in nature. The life of participating with nature considers living simply and wisely while cooperating with both its lowest and highest elements. Thoreau calls for a change in life by changing the conventional ideas of standard societal views and its participation with the torpor of the material mass. Throughout Walden, Thoreau delves into his surroundings, the very specifics of nature while trying to live the ideal life. Perhaps the main theme and overbearing concept that Thoreau wishes to convey to the reader both in the conclusion and throughout W ...
    Related: thoreau, walden, active life, main theme, rituals
  • Betham - 1,157 words
    Betham The story of Doctor Faustus is a familiar myth, in which the main character sells his soul , makes a deal with the devil, for something he speciously holds more valuable. There are many versions of this story in our culture, and it would take quite a time to make note of them all. Most people will have seen or heard one of the various stories in the for of a book, play, movie, or television show. The original story of Doctor Faustus, as created by Christopher Marlow, was prevalent to society at the time because it spoke to people's growing dizzy awareness of their possibilities and capabilities at this time. By that explanation it seems that the classic Marlow play, Doctor Faustus, wo ...
    Related: marilyn monroe, main character, power over, persona, societal
  • Cloning: How Far Will It Go - 1,863 words
    Cloning: How Far Will It Go? Cloning: How far will it go? Everyday people find themselves at a crossroads that requires a decision as to which path to follow. In the past few years, scientists have gained knowledge about cloning that could impact our lives for centuries to come. As a society we are at a crossroads and we will have to decide how to use this knowledge. Will we choose to increase our power over nature or will we develop a partnership? There are many benefits of cloning, but do they outweigh the possibility of losing genetic diversity, facing genetic discrimination, and the scary consequences portrayed in science fiction books like Brave New World and 1984, and movies like Gatta ...
    Related: alzheimer's disease, personality traits, lower class, exploration, remorse
  • Engl: Book Critique Mark Posters The Mode Of Information - 1,361 words
    ENGL444: BOOK CRITIQUE - Mark Posters "The Mode of Information" Maitiu Ward Mark Posters "The Mode of Information" can be seen as something of an attempt to establish a new discourse in socio-political theory. He does this mainly through the concerted criticism of several prominent philosophers, including Marx, Foucault, Derrida and Baudrillard. Typically, his prime concern with the bulk of most of these philosophers works is their tendency towards totalization, or their failure to adequately incorporate an understanding of what Poster sees as the "mode of information" into their theorizing. From what remains of his counterparts theories, Poster attempts to assemble his new discourse, incorp ...
    Related: book critique, critique, mark, mode, brief overview
  • Extraterrestrials - 1,262 words
    Extraterrestrials Can the Earth be the only place in the Universe that harbors life? Most astronomers don't believe this is true. Certain statistics in the Universe provide evidence that living beings may be common place through out the universe, on planets of other stars besides the sun. In this paper I plan to discuss the various viewpoints of those that believe that extraterrestrials exist and have even been visiting Earth, and the viewpoints of skpetics that believe that aliens don't exist and have not been visiting Earth. To get into the topic we must first start at the base of the subject. First the question must be dealt with of life being only indigenous to planet Earth. One of the m ...
    Related: extraterrestrial life, human race, earth science, milky way galaxy, debate
  • Fried Green Tomatoes - 675 words
    Fried Green Tomatoes Film Analysis Fried Green Tomatoes For this paper I have chosen to review the film Fried Green Tomatoes. It is a tale of a small old town, its more popular residents, and a murder mystery told in retrospect by the main character Idggy. I was able to identify several social structures within the small town during the movies flashbacks as well as its modern day narrative setting. There were no government officials present, but a sheriff kept order amongst citizens. That same sheriff, however, partied with the same people that he enforced the law upon. It was the typical small town environment where everyone knew each other and was generally friendly towards one another. Th ...
    Related: fried, green tomatoes, tomatoes, white people, black white
  • Hamlet Brutal Truth - 1,185 words
    ... pectacle is more than the brain-numbing flicker of images on the television set. The spectacle is something greater than the electronic devices to which we play the role of passive receptors; it is the totality of manipulations made upon history, time, class—in short, all of reality—that serve to preserve the influence of the spectacle itself. Much like Foucault’s discipline, the spectacle is an autonomous entity , no longer (if ever) serving a master, but an entity which selectively chooses its apparent beneficiaries, for its own ends, and for only as long as it needs them. Consequently, resistance is difficult and the struggle is demanding. On the one hand, Debord faults ...
    Related: hamlet, student life, virtual worlds, real life, translation
  • How Overpopulation Causes Social Problems - 1,470 words
    How Overpopulation Causes Social Problems How Overpopulation Causes Social Problems Introduction The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how overpopulation causes social problems. To do so you must take many things into consideration, such as different views of racial problems and conflicting definitions of a social problem. Social problems can be defined in many different ways. They effect everyone and some of us encounter problems everyday as a result of our race, religion, gender, or low income. Others experience problems from technological change or declining neighborhoods, others are affected directly by crime and violence in their own neighborhood, and sometimes definitions of soci ...
    Related: overpopulation, social groups, social order, social problems, social structures
  • How Useful Is The Concept Of Elite To The Distribtion Of Power - 2,552 words
    ... p. 71 - 92 Sociology Essay Terence M. Blackett How useful is the concept of elite for understanding the distribution of power in either Britain or the United States? Introduction In America perhaps only race is a more sensitive subject than the way we sort ourselves out in the struggle for success. The eminent sociologist Robert Merton calls it the structure of opportunity. In the understanding of the usefulness of the term elite, there are some common historical variables, which must be looked at in order to appreciate the power organisms at work even in American society, and how from the days of Thomas Jefferson to the era of Newt Gingrich, the assumption of superiority is an undercu ...
    Related: elite, political power, power elite, university press, frederick jackson turner
  • Job Stress - 1,512 words
    Job Stress The official working week is being reduced to 35 hours a week. In most countries in the world, it is limited to 45 hours a week. The trend during the last century seems to be less work, more play. Yet, what may be true for blue-collar workers or state employees - is not necessarily so for white-collar employees. It is not rare for these people - lawyers, accountants, consultants, managers, academics - to put in 80 hour weeks. This trend is so widespread and its social consequences so known that it acquired the unflattering nickname workaholism, a combination of the words "work" and "alcoholism". Family life is disrupted, intellectual horizons narrow, the consequences to the workah ...
    Related: job stress, industrial revolution, social structures, true meaning, monopoly
  • Last Hurrah - 1,149 words
    Last Hurrah Edwin O'Connor's novel The Last Hurrah presents an effective view of the difficult and complex life of the Irish-American community in Boston of the 1950's. The author uses a number of characterizations to produce themes that relate to the political and social considerations of this era. He also provides most of the accounts in his novel from a single perspective, that of Frank Skeffington. He is the main character. This character in particular enables O'Connor to present the topic with some accuracy while continuing to create a fictional account of the time frame. This was his goal, to provide truth inside a fictional story. O'Connor talks directly about and gives great consider ...
    Related: criminal activity, self identity, political history, prejudice, accurate
  • Little White Lie - 1,833 words
    ... animal's heart driven motivations drives them to individually try and make life better for themselves and leads the pigs towards greediness and the eventual assertion of power. The pigs go through the Jones's farm house and eventually come away with all its clothing, excess food and alcohol three things that eventually set them apart from the rest of the animals. We can see this lead to the argument, inherent in the episode, that man will always be driven towards such things as private property another evident criticism of Marxist belief. The materialistic understanding of society, however, is a nod to Marxist analysis, though the notion that men are so different that can not fully be ...
    Related: civil war, old major, private property, napoleon, savage
  • Modernization - 1,602 words
    Modernization Modernization can be interpreted as growth of a nation in all areas (i.e. social, economic, political), for example, the aim is development of national forms of polity, the objects of which are to increase the social product with fair shares for all. Successful models now include Japan and the Soviet Union (Apter 1965, Preface). Although this definition is outdated, as the inclusion of the Soviet Union (no longer in existence and with serious economic and social problems persisting in Russia) and Japan (also currently in a recession along with most of Asia) illustrates, the ideal of modernization is clear. Another approach to the term modernization is not to take it as an ideal ...
    Related: modernization, east asia, industrialized nations, oxford university, asia
  • Post Soviet Russia - 484 words
    Post Soviet Russia In December of 1991, the Soviet Union disintegrated into fifteen separate countries. Its collapse was hailed by the west as a victory for freedom, a triumph of democracy over totalitarianism, and evidence of the superiority of capitalism over socialism. It was a relief for many to watch the Soviet Union brake down, finally bringing the cold world to an end. This day made history as the whole world reformulated its political, economic and military alliances. What where the causes of the break-up and who was to blame for it? By the time the Soviet Unions last leader came to power in 1985, Mikhail Gorbachev, the country was suffering severe economic and political problems. Hi ...
    Related: russia, soviet, soviet russia, soviet union, social issues
  • Poverty And Social Structure - 581 words
    Poverty And Social Structure Pitzak, Chris Soc. 422 Dr. Heaton May 17, 1999 POVERTY AND SOCIAL STRUCTURES Although the United States is one of the richest countries in the world many of it's people sleep in the streets, dig through garbage cans to find food, and carry all that they own in this world on their backs or in shopping carts. These people are known as the homeless. Recently I had the opportunity of helping, and at the same time being educated by one of the members of this unfortunate group. I was able to experience first hand how a homeless person thinks and feels through an intimate means of communications popularly known as writing notes. Why writing notes? Because the individual ...
    Related: poverty, social structure, social structures, minimum wage, african american
  • Raise The Red Lantern - 1,977 words
    Raise The Red Lantern Anthropology of Women Raise the Red Lantern "All the world's a stage; all of us are taking the elements of plot, character, and costume and turning into performances of possibilities"(Ward1999: 5) Raise the Red Lantern tells a compelling and sorrowful story of a young women whose life is destined to be ruined in a male-dominated society. This can be an awakening of some sort to any woman. As Ward states in her text, women learn the rules of our half of the world as well as those of the other half, since we regularly move in and out of the male world. There she defines women's culture. The term has also been used in its anthropological sense to encompass the familial and ...
    Related: lantern, conspicuous consumption, world women, traditional china, prestige
  • 30 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2

To the top

Example research papers produced by our company:

We write: custom term papers, custom essay writing, admission essays, persuasive and argumentative essays, critical essays, dissertations and theses

Research paper topics, free essays: postman, angel, arterial, roughly, fatigue, etc.

Copyright © 2002-2018 PromptPapers.com. All rights reserved.