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Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: social skills

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  • Analytical Discussion Of Cold Mountain By Charles Frazier - 1,062 words
    Analytical Discussion of "Cold Mountain" by Charles Frazier browneyedgirl The Journey is the Destination The story of Cold Mountain is of a war and adventure across the mountainous terrain, but, most of all it is a love story. Before the blossoming love is torn by the separation of war, Ada and Inman venture into the woods together to say their goodbyes. There Inman recites to Ada a story told to him by an Indian woman. At the end of the story, Ada had nothing but a satirical remark regarding the validity of Inmans tale. It wasnt until later that she realized "that it had not been about an old woman but about his own fears and desires."(p 254) The moment in the woods made them recognize thei ...
    Related: analytical, frazier, mountain, indian woman, social skills
  • Ap 1996 Number 1 Answer - 641 words
    Ap 1996 Number 1 Answer Social and biological factors have an impact on body weight, perception, alcoholism, extroversion, and schizophrenia in the individual. Many social characteristics of individuals are associated with body weight in societies of today. Factors, such as gender, age, ethnicity, the occupation, household size, income, education received, and marriage can have an impact on body weight. Females tend to have more stored body fat than the males, which can cause them to be more likely to be obese. As social roles and expectations increase, obesity and other weight problems tend to increase as the person ages. In the ethnic variations, the minority seemed to have more of a weigh ...
    Related: over time, lose weight, family history, peer, external
  • Attention Deficit Hyperactivity - 1,205 words
    Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder or Hyperactivity (ADHD), disorder beginning in childhood, characterized by a persistent inability to sit still, focus attention on specific tasks, and control impulses. Children with ADHD show these behaviors more frequently and severely than other children of the same age. A person with ADHD may have difficulty with school, work, friendships, or family life. ADHD has also been referred to as attention-deficit disorder, hyperkinesis, minimal brain dysfunction, and minimal brain damage. Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder is one of the most common mental disorders of childhood, affecting 3 to 5 percent of school-age ...
    Related: attention deficit, attention deficit disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, deficit, deficit disorder, deficit hyperactivity, hyperactivity
  • Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder - 1,225 words
    Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Understanding the Behavioral Disorder: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Imagine living in a fast-moving kaleidoscope, where sounds, images, and thoughts are constantly shifting. Feeling easily bored, yet helpless to keep your mind on tasks you need to complete. Distracted by unimportant sights and sounds, your mind drives you from one thought or activity to the next. Perhaps you are so wrapped up in a collage of thoughts and images that you don't notice when someone speaks to you. "Tommy can't sit still. He is disruptive at school with his constant talking and clowning around. He leaves the classroom without the teacher's permission. Al ...
    Related: attention deficit, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, deficit, deficit hyperactivity, disorder, hyperactivity, hyperactivity disorder
  • Autism - 1,018 words
    Autism Autism Throughout the years the diagnosis of autism has changed dramatically. Once, it was mistakenly diagnosed as childhood schizophrenia. Now that much more extensive research has been done, researchers have found distinct characteristics that are typical of autistic individuals. It is most often characterized by difficulty in the child's ability to respond to people, events, and objects. Responses to sensations of light, sound, and feeling may be exaggerated. Delayed speech and language may be associated. Other characteristics include: impairment in ability to make peer friendships, absence of imaginative activity, stereotyped body movements, persistent preoccupation with parts of ...
    Related: autism, cognitive functioning, genetic basis, multiple sclerosis, diagnosed
  • Autism - 1,085 words
    ... ternal pleasure. Another theory is that sudden episodes of self-injury may be caused by sub-clinical seizures. An infection of the middle ear is thought to be a cause of the head banging or ear hitting. The last theory is that some forms of self-injury may be a result of over arousal (such as frustration). It acts as a release, and lowers arousal. The social theorists have a different perspective on self-injurious behavior. They believe that the autistic individuals engage in these behaviors to obtain attention from other people. Research on how to treat autism is a continuous process. It also makes it difficult because each child reacts differently to the various treatments. There is no ...
    Related: autism, occupational therapy, dairy products, immune system, auto
  • Behavior Therapies - 1,165 words
    Behavior Therapies Behavior Therapies The treatment of disorders (can be either mental or physical) by the use of either psychological needs or by the use of medicinal needs is called therapy. Therapy involves talking with a trained professional about things such as symptoms, problems, and understanding one's self. Therapists help patients in many ways: Help patients understand and cope with their illnesses. Empathize with their patients and help them understand why they behave the way they do. Help patients make positive changes by discussing their past behavior. Help patients discover why they think certain thoughts and how these thoughts affect their feelings. Help patients to identi ...
    Related: behavior modification, behavior therapy, positive behavior, term goals, time magazine
  • Birth Control Education - 1,913 words
    ... who have to tell parents that their child is pregnant or will die from the AIDS virus. This is by far not a job that they enjoy doing. They want desperately for the AIDS epidemic to be terminated, and to stop seeing so many children diagnosed with a STD and become impregnated. Like the parents, they too are taxpayers and voters, but they have one more ball in their court. They are experts in this field, and have the ability to alter peoples views by simply telling them what they see every day. These are the people the school board will call and ask the opinion of while trying to decide an appropriate course of action. Unhappily this is a minor issue to doctors, whom are faced with cance ...
    Related: birth control, drug education, education classes, education programs, education system, health education, sex education
  • Boot Camps - 2,059 words
    Boot Camps The questions put forth in this research paper are: whether participants in juvenile boot camps receive the services prescribed for them, what impact juvenile boot camps have on recidivism rates, what benefits juvenile offenders derive from boot camps, and whether juvenile boot camps are cost effective. Other topics that will arise in the course of this paper are the definition of boot camp, and goals of juvenile boot camps. Responding to increasing juvenile arrests, several states and localities established juvenile boot camps. Modeled after boot camps for adult offenders, the first camps emphasized military discipline and physical conditioning. In response to increases in juveni ...
    Related: boot, boot camps, case management, general accounting office, adolescent
  • Cause Effect Of Reading Books - 585 words
    Cause & Effect Of Reading Books This essay argues that the cause and effects of reading books are numerous, but will focus on one cause, starting to read books on a regular basis, and two effects, increased comprehension abilities, and the promotion of vocabulary growth. Reading skills are essential to success in society today. The ability to read is highly valued and very important for social and economic advancement. The following paragraphs will try to explain some of the important effects that reading books will have in a persons life. In America today, most children are beginning or trying to talk around the age of two years. This is a time when language skills are just starting to deve ...
    Related: cause & effect, reading aloud, reading books, america today, public speaking
  • Characters: - 694 words
    Characters: Ralph The protagonist of Lord of the Flies. He is 12 years old, tall, blond, and attractive. Ralph is a natural leader and after discovering the conch shell, he is elected as leader of the boys. Throughout the novel Ralph tries to establish order and focus on rescue. He decides that a boy can only speak at the meetings if he is holding the conch shell. He wants to keep the fire on the mountain going so that is a plane passes, the boys can be saved. He also encourages the boys to build huts. He is very much a true human because although he tries to maintain order, he is often tempted by the indulgences of the other boys. He occasionally makes foolish mistakes, such as joining in w ...
    Related: the jungle, social skills, black hair, torture, rescue
  • Child Abuse - 765 words
    Child Abuse Parenting is not instinctive. If it were, everyone who had a child would be a good parent. Consequently, child abuse is a rising phenomenon in our society. Though no single factor has been identified as the cause of child maltreatment, it appears to be influenced by parents' histories, psychological resources, and economic status. Parenting must be learned. While this is often done through experience, education courses for individuals prior to their becoming parents, and close evaluation of questionable homes could enhance parents' knowledge and the childrens' well being. A large number of abusive parents have histories of physical and emotional abuse inflicted upon them during t ...
    Related: abuse, child abuse, child maltreatment, child rearing, emotional abuse
  • Child Sports - 1,911 words
    ... ays Rainer Martens PhD. Dr. Martens runs a coaching education program in Champaign, Ill. "Yet we trun our kids over to someone who we know nothing about", he adds. "We think nothing about whether this person knows how to protect the physical safety of the child, or can communicate the values we think are important." Coaches, even the nicest, most supportive ones, can inadvertantly harm a child psychologically or physically, simply because they do not know the proper way to communicate. But this is a problem can may be quickly eradicated. Tom Crawford, a psychologist and motor-development expert who directs coaching for the U.S. Olympic Committee, has founded an intervention program calle ...
    Related: child abuse, sports, youth sports, angeles times, motor skills
  • Culture Shock - 1,172 words
    Culture Shock Culture in ancient times was defined as "the sum total of the equipment of the human individual, which enables him to be attuned to his immediate environment on the historical past on the other". It reflects in effect what humans have added to Nature. It comprises the spiritual, material, intellectual and emotional features of a society and includes, in addition to the arts and letters, the value systems, traditions, modes of life and beliefs of the society. It also absorbs from other cultures and undergoes changes with time, sometimes beneficial, sometimes regressive. (Barlas, 15). Culture shock is a severe psychological reaction that results from adjusting to the realities of ...
    Related: culture shock, shock, potential impact, international business, adjusting
  • Daycare - 1,165 words
    Daycare Daycare has become a controversy because of the great quantity of advantages and disadvantages that it involves. While a very large number of parents have to rely on child care centers because of career ambitions or financial needs that only their jobs can fulfill, most child psychiatrists believe that the ideal growing environment for an infant is at home with the family. The problem is that choosing the right caregiver, a good substitute for the parents, is very hard, and the consequences of a wrong decision can be very detrimental to the childs personality development. This choice depends on many factors like culture, education and especially income. In fact, the financial availab ...
    Related: daycare, basic education, academic achievement, negative impact, economical
  • Diagnosis Of Patience - 1,151 words
    Diagnosis Of Patience Jennifer came to me several failed visits and theripys through out her teen years. She had, like it past reports complained of "always feeling worried and anxious". She often talked on how going out to social settings and relationships was so difficult. Believing that it was her fate to always be alone. She felt very uncomfortable around crowds as if they would turn on her in angry or disapproval. Jennifer had came to me after a referral from a mutual friend of mine. One that she had built a friendship with the current job that she had worked continuously for 2 yrs. Past History: Talking about her past relationships, I found she hadn't been intimate with any single pers ...
    Related: diagnosis, patience, social skills, short term, dread
  • Education - 491 words
    Education Education is one of the most important tools that a society possesses. The right implementation of this tool is one of the greatest ways of assuring the quality of life within a society. The ability to better ourselves, is one of the strongest inherit abilities of the human race. Without the consistent development of the human race, life would be nothing more than survival. At its most basic level of definition, education is nothing more than the teaching of ideas. The early stages of schooling instill more attitude and social skills than knowledge. The younger stages of a person's life are usually the most definable years of their lives. For this reason many rudimentary skills are ...
    Related: general public, human race, private schools, equality, possesses
  • Elementary Phys Ed - 1,039 words
    Elementary Phys. Ed The effect of physical education on elementary students is noticeable through all types of skill development. From personal experiences, people can conclude that there is more to games and activities than just expending energy to relieve and calm younger children. The main focus of my ideas is mainly directed towards motor skills, relationships and how they contribute to student learning, and setting and achieving goals as well as the five areas to which I set beliefs, theories, and assumptions. Children, especially young, need to learn basic motor skills to make their physical life easier when they get older. Sometimes motor skills come to us phylogenetically, such as wa ...
    Related: elementary, phys, cognitive development, gifted students, receiver
  • Emotions - 1,124 words
    ... unishment was not something I chose to use as part of parenting techniques. Instead I chose to use discipline (on most good parenting days!) Discipline means to teach. It should be a positive way of helping and guiding children to achieve self-control, self-esteem and confidence. Children need discipline for many reasons some of that are protection, to get along with others, and to understand limits. Discipline helps children understand the logical consequences of their actions and learn common rules that everyone must live by. It can help teach a child values that are held by the family and community. "The purpose of discipline, then, is to teach children acceptable behavior so that the ...
    Related: cognitive processing, self esteem, problem solve, suicide, hamilton
  • Essay On Flowers For Algernon - 751 words
    Essay On Flowers For Algernon In this story, the intelligence of a mentally challenged man is greatly enhanced by neuro-surgical treatments. He forms an attachment with a mouse named Algernon who has already undergone this same treatment shortly before him. Charlie is asked to keep a dairy and the novel consists of his daily reports. As his intelligence grows Charlie becomes more aware of his status. He soon develops into a super genius and finds he is just as isolated and lonely (if not, more so) as he was before the treatment. I felt that I could see the characters develop before my eyes, especially the young Charlie who haunted the older Charlie while he was in his genius state. Daniel Ke ...
    Related: algernon, flowers for algernon, moral decision, social skills, mouse
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