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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: social roles

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  • A Letter From Saudi Arabia - 1,402 words
    ... and an Arabic Muslim. When I say diversity, I basically mean the traditions, the way of practicing religion. I have come to realize the fact that Islam is practiced differently in all the different parts of the world, and the way I practiced it when I was in the US, is certainly quite different from what I have seen and practiced here. Then there are so many customs which actually have their root in the beliefs of Islam, which I was totally unaware of. For example everybody removes their shoes at the doorstep before entering the house, even when you are invited to someones home. Umar told me that it is a tradition that has been carried out for centuries now10. Speaking of traditions, in ...
    Related: arabia, saudi, saudi arabia, labor force, american dollar
  • A Postmodern Age - 1,423 words
    A Post-Modern Age? A Post-Modern Age? Introduction: Post-Modernism can be described as a particular style of thought. It is a concept that correlates the emergence of new features and types of social life and economic order in a culture; often called modernization, post-industrial, consumer, media, or multinational capitalistic societies. In Modernity, we have the sense or idea that the present is discontinuous with the past, that through a process of social, technological, and cultural change (either through improvement, that is, progress, or through decline) life in the present is fundamentally different from life in the past. This sense or idea as a world view contrasts with what is commo ...
    Related: postmodern, american market, european history, post modern, depot
  • Aggression Biological Theory Vs Behaviorist Theory - 1,254 words
    Aggression - Biological Theory vs Behaviorist Theory Aggression is a problem that affects all members of society. There is no doubt that aggression pays off for some. Parents who yell and threaten punishment get results. The child who hits the hardest gets the toy. The brother who is willing to be the most vicious in a fight wins. The teacher who gives the hardest test and threatens to flunk the most students usually gets the most study time from students. The spouse who threatens to get the maddest gets their way. The male who acts the most macho and aggressive gets the praise of certain groups of males. For decades psychologists have attempted to find the causes of aggression. The focus of ...
    Related: aggression, aggression in children, behaviorist, biological, biological factors
  • Aggressive Behavior - 1,312 words
    Aggressive Behavior Aggression is a behavioral characteristic that refers to forceful actions or procedures (such a deliberate attack) with intentions to dominate or master. It tends to be hostile, injurious, or destructive, and is often motivated by frustration (The Merriam-Webster Dictionary, 1995). For an individual, aggressive behavior is considered understandable and normal under appropriate circumstances, but when it is frequent, intense, lasting, and pervasive, it is more likely to be a symptom of a mental disorder. Likewise, aggression between groups, can be in the form of healthy competition, but can become harmful when unfair or unjust disadvantage or frustration is perceived, lead ...
    Related: abnormal behavior, aggressive, aggressive behavior, behavioral therapy, social norms
  • Anorexia Nervosa - 1,281 words
    ... r parents and teachers no longer sustain her. She is unable to acknowledge her sexual desires and may regard her developing woman's body as an alien invasion. Her fear of adult femininity may also be a fear of becoming like her mother. According to this theory, fasting restores a sense of order to her life by allowing her to exert control over herself and others. She is proud of her ability to lose weight, and self-imposed rules about food are a substitute for genuine independence. Some students of anorexia believe that these girls starve themselves to suppress or control feelings of emotional emptiness. They struggle for perfection to prove that they need not depend on others to tell th ...
    Related: anorexia, anorexia nervosa, nervosa, grolier multimedia encyclopedia, young woman
  • Anorexia Nervosa Is Refusal To Maintain Body Weight At Or Above A Minimally Normal Weight For Age And Height Intense Fear Of - 1,280 words
    ... ers no longer sustain her. She is unable to acknowledge her sexual desires and may regard her developing woman's body as an alien invasion. Her fear of adult femininity may also be a fear of becoming like her mother. According to this theory, fasting restores a sense of order to her life by allowing her to exert control over herself and others. She is proud of her ability to lose weight, and self-imposed rules about food are a substitute for genuine independence. Some students of anorexia believe that these girls starve themselves to suppress or control feelings of emotional emptiness. They struggle for perfection to prove that they need not depend on others to tell them who they are and ...
    Related: anorexia, anorexia nervosa, body weight, height, intense, lose weight, nervosa
  • Ap 1996 Number 1 Answer - 641 words
    Ap 1996 Number 1 Answer Social and biological factors have an impact on body weight, perception, alcoholism, extroversion, and schizophrenia in the individual. Many social characteristics of individuals are associated with body weight in societies of today. Factors, such as gender, age, ethnicity, the occupation, household size, income, education received, and marriage can have an impact on body weight. Females tend to have more stored body fat than the males, which can cause them to be more likely to be obese. As social roles and expectations increase, obesity and other weight problems tend to increase as the person ages. In the ethnic variations, the minority seemed to have more of a weigh ...
    Related: over time, lose weight, family history, peer, external
  • Aristotelian Nicomachean Ethics - 858 words
    Aristotelian Nicomachean Ethics Achieving excellence in terms of Aristotle's "Nichomachean Ethics" Before actually focusing on the main details of Aristotle's Argument, we must pay careful attention to the opening remarks he makes in Book I about the nature of his inquiry. The first important point that he stresses is that the study of the character of human beings is dependent on what a human being is. Aristotle states that that a human is not a "man that lives in isolation, but a man that also lives with parents, children, wife, and friends and fellow citizens generally, since man is by nature a social and political being". Humans, in other words, derive their identity and accordingly thei ...
    Related: aristotelian, ethics, human ethics, nichomachean ethics, nicomachean, nicomachean ethics
  • Aristotle - 1,798 words
    Aristotle Let us again return to the good we are seeking, and ask what it can be. It seems different in different actions and arts; it is different in medicine, in strategy, and in the other arts likewise. What then is the good of each? Surely that for whose sake everything else is done. In medicine this is health, in strategy victory, in architecture a house, in any other sphere something else, and in every action and pursuit the end; for it is for the sake of this that all men do whatever else they do. Therefore, if there is an end for all that we do, this will be the good achievable by action, and if there are more than one, these will be the goods achievable by action. So the argument ha ...
    Related: aristotle, social roles, active life, good thing, notion
  • Crittically Examine The Use Of The Term Community - 1,380 words
    ... titutionalisation was not acceptable or possible. The traditional social support networks found in the close knit occupational communities were also missing due to the decline of the close knit community. This was taken one step further when in the eighties, the desire to privatise public enterprises and reduce public expenditure, including industrial subsidies led to a rapid decline of manufacturing in the early 1980s and led to historically high levels of unemployment. Which as we have seen weakens a communities social support network. Over the last twenty years the main way social policy has responded to these problems is by encouraging the development of community care initiatives, t ...
    Related: community care, community policing, examine, short term, personal identity
  • Depression And Women - 558 words
    Depression And Women Around the world, depression occurs more frequently among women than among men. The female-male ratio ranges from 2:1 to 3:1 in most industrialized countries (Nolen-Hoeksema, 1999). "Women are 2-3 times more likely than men to suffer from depression"(Encarta Encyclopedia, 2001). "Why do women feel blue more often than men?" Three explanations of the sex difference in depression for a potential hypothesis are the following: (1) Women are more willing to seek help and, therefore, are more likely to be categorized as having depression. (2) Biological differences may exist between females and males that predispose females to become more depressed than males. (3) Psychologica ...
    Related: men and women, social roles, encarta encyclopedia, immune system, frequent
  • Depression Is A - 607 words
    Depression is a psychiatric disorder characterized by feelings of worthlessness, guilt, sadness, helplessness, and hopelessness. It is different then normal sadness or grief from the loss of a loved one because it is persistent and severe. Clinical depression has many related symptoms trouble sleeping, eating disorders, withdrawal and inactivity, self-punishment, and loss of pleasure. People that are depressed do not like to do things they may usually like to. Surveys that have been taken that show approximately 20 in 100 people suffer from depression at any one time. About one if four Americans will suffer from a depression over the course of their lifetime. Depression strikes men and women ...
    Related: clinical depression, major depression, blood pressure, manic-depressive illness, lithium
  • Downs Syndrome - 639 words
    DownS Syndrome Description: Juvenile, non-fiction, informational, picture book, accompanied by text. Jon O, as the boy with Downs Syndrome is called, is the main character of this childrens book. His parents, siblings, schoolmates, and friends were the other characters that made up the story. The story briefly sums up what Jon O is like and why he is a special boy. Jon O was categorized as retarded by the family doctor before he was even born, and the book portrayed him as a special child that had many differences from all the normal people around him. Elaine Ominsky made very clear all of the childs differences and made every accomplishment out to be nothing short of a miracle. The Wolfensb ...
    Related: downs, syndrome, social roles, classroom setting, pictures
  • Ecological Self - 703 words
    Ecological Self Diversity is a whirlwind of color through a society. There are no two people in the world that are exactly alike. Individuality distinguishes one person or thing from others (Landau, 364 Ed). A persons environment as a whole: an interaction with others, experiences, and time, makes a collage of traits that distinguishes someone as an individual. David Sibleys theory of the "Ecological Self" or Identity is bound by his determents of social, cultural, and spatial context. Sibley believes that class, race, gender, and nation shapes our identity, it is a single concept that is molded by our experiences from the world. I do not agree with this claim because people are individuals, ...
    Related: ecological, self identity, important role, college campuses, gender
  • Freud - 2,304 words
    Freud Sigmund Freud was the first of six children to be born into his middle class, Jewish family. His father was a wool merchant, and was the provider for the family. From the time Freud was a child, he pondered theories in math, science, and philosophy, but in his teens, he took a deep interest in what he later called psychoanalysis. He wanted to discover how a persons mind works, so he began to explore the conscious and unconscious parts of ones psyche. Freuds parents and siblings were directly involved in allowing him to pursue this unexplored area of psychology. He was given his own room so that he could study his books in silence, and was only disturbed when it was time to eat. Freud e ...
    Related: freud, sigmund freud, stuart mill, cultural norms, disagree
  • Juvenile Delinquency And Religion - 1,338 words
    Juvenile Delinquency And Religion Over the years, countless efforts have been made to find a comprehensive explanation for delinquency. The results of these efforts have offered possible reasons as being both biological and social. It is still debatable as to what forces have the greatest influence on youth crime, but it is undoubted that several factors clearly make an impact. The direct relationships a child has with concrete social elements, like his family and friends, are likely to give some intimation of his involvement in crime. However, it must be noted that there are more abstract contexts for socialization that also exist as potential explanations for a childs behavior. The most pr ...
    Related: civil religion, delinquency, juvenile, juvenile delinquency, religion
  • Keith Porter Is Gay - 1,941 words
    Keith Porter Is Gay As they look over the world's painful panorama of war and terror, some people conclude that it is too late, that no amount of information or activity could possibly follow through on the critical work that has already begun. But those who take that pessimistic view understand neither Mr. Gay Keith Porter nor his current rung on the ladder to total power. What follows is a call to action for those of us who care -- a large enough number to improve the physical and spiritual quality of life for the population at present and for those yet to come. On the surface, it would seem merely that his position that we should abandon the institutionalized and revered concept of democr ...
    Related: keith, porter, background information, daily lives, engaging
  • Living The Legacy: The Womens Rights Movement 1848 1998 - 2,323 words
    ... ghout the United States." A constitutional amendment would apply uniformly, regardless of where a person lived. The second wing of the post-suffrage movement was one that had not been explicitly anticipated in the Seneca Falls "Declaration of Sentiments." It was the birth control movement, initiated by a public health nurse, Margaret Sanger, just as the suffrage drive was nearing its victory. The idea of woman's right to control her own body, and especially to control her own reproduction and sexuality, added a visionary new dimension to the ideas of women's emancipation. This movement not only endorsed educating women about existing birth control methods. It also spread the conviction t ...
    Related: 1848, american women, battered women, civil rights, civil rights act, civil rights movement, control movement
  • Nichomachean Ethics - 860 words
    Nichomachean Ethics Philosophy 11/15/99 Achieving excellence in terms of Aristotle's Nichomachean Ethics Before actually focusing on the main details of Aristotle's Argument, we must pay careful attention to the opening remarks he makes in Book I about the nature of his inquiry. The first important point that he stresses is that the study of the character of human beings is dependent on what a human being is. Aristotle states that that a human is not a man that lives in isolation, but a man that also lives with parents, children, wife, and friends and fellow citizens generally, since man is by nature a social and political being. Humans, in other words, derive their identity and accordingly ...
    Related: ethics, human ethics, nichomachean ethics, human beings, human life
  • Nicomachean Ethics - 858 words
    Nicomachean Ethics Philosophy 11/15/99 Achieving excellence in terms of Aristotle's Nichomachean Ethics Before actually focusing on the main details of Aristotle's Argument, we must pay careful attention to the opening remarks he makes in Book I about the nature of his inquiry. The first important point that he stresses is that the study of the character of human beings is dependent on what a human being is. Aristotle states that that a human is not a man that lives in isolation, but a man that also lives with parents, children, wife, and friends and fellow citizens generally, since man is by nature a social and political being. Humans, in other words, derive their identity and accordingly t ...
    Related: ethics, human ethics, nichomachean ethics, nicomachean, nicomachean ethics
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