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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: social conventions

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  • Fathers And Sons - 1,652 words
    Father's And Sons Turgenov's Fathers and Sons has several characters who hold strong views of the world. Pavel believes that Russia needs structure from such things as institution, religion, and class hierarchy. Madame Odintsov views the world as simple so long as she keeps it systematic and free from interference. This essay will focus on perhaps the most interesting and complex character in Fathers and Sons: Bazarov. Vladimir Nabakov writes that "Turgenov takes his creature [B] out of a self-imposed pattern and places him in the the normal world of chance." By examining Bazarov this essay will make this statement more clear to the reader. Using nihilism as a starting point we shall look at ...
    Related: fathers and sons, sons, life issues, social conventions, defeat
  • Free Play - 497 words
    Free Play The title of the second section in the book Free Play appropriately called The Work. The word work has several meanings, for most it is some act of labor or some skill they perform for money. To others work could be an artistic term, a final product of creativity. Not only could a work be a painting or a sketch but it could also be a score or in this case a dance, choreographed or not. In everyday life one always hears "practice makes perfect." Lately in Improvisational Structures class we have been "practicing" improves for Winterdance. However in this case we are just getting used to structures and we are also still growing closer as a group. According to Free Play, "Competence t ...
    Related: different types, everyday life, class period, attempting, professionalism
  • Kate Chopin - 1,426 words
    Kate Chopin Kate Chopin is an American writer of the late nineteenth century. She is known for her depictions of southern culture and of women's struggles for freedom. At this time in American history, women did not have a voice of their own and according to custom, they were to obey their father and husband. Generally, many women agreed to accept this customary way of life. Kate Chopin thought quite differently. The boldness Kate Chopin takes in portraying women in the late nineteenth century can be seen throughout The Awakening and other short stories. The following is an overview of her dramatic writing style. Elaine Showalter states, Chopin went boldly beyond the work of her precursors i ...
    Related: chopin, kate, kate chopin, writing style, short story
  • Moliere - 1,468 words
    Moliere Molire Molire, pseudonym of JEAN BAPTISTE POQUELIN (1622-73), French dramatist, and one of the greatest of all writers of comedies. His universal comic types still delight audiences; his plays are often produced and have been much translated. Molire was born in Paris on January 15, 1622, the son of a wealthy tapestry maker. From an early age he was completely devoted to the theater. In 1643 he joined a theatrical company established by the Bjarts, a family of professional actors; he married one of the members of the family, Armande Bjart, in 1662. The troupe, which Molire named the Illustre Thtre, played in Paris until 1645 and then toured the provinces for 13 years, returning to Par ...
    Related: moliere, divine right, royal society, century literature, misanthrope
  • Natural Born Killers - 763 words
    Natural Born Killers John Byers Ideology is an ever-present factor in our everyday lives. A good amount of the information we receive is tainted by ideological values. These values, unique to the source of the information are windows or reinforcements on their standings regarding any number of topics. When we receive the information at hand it is then subject our own individual ideological beliefs and values that we hold true. Ideology in film is such a powerful factor that in my opinion it is the biggest factor that should be consider when analyzing the information of the film. When it comes down to it film is a direct result of what someone is showing you. What that person is showing you i ...
    Related: ancient religion, oliver stone, everyday lives, category, verbally
  • Obsessive Compulsive Disorder - 1,388 words
    ... ng and waning course. That is, symptoms may get somewhat better for months or even years, only to get worse again before returning to a lower level of severity. "Only about 5 to 10 percent of OCD sufferers enjoy a spontaneous remission in which all symptoms of OCD go away for good (Wayne K. Goodman, MD, University of Florida Brain Institute, 1999). Another 5 to 10 percent experience progressive deterioration in their symptoms." Stress can make OCD worse, but trying to eliminate all stress is unlikely to quell OCD. In fact, it is better for most people with OCD to keep busy. Idleness can be the breeding ground for increased obsessional thinking. Changes in the severity of OCD may be relat ...
    Related: compulsive, compulsive disorder, disorder, obsessive, obsessive compulsive disorder
  • Russian History 1917 - 1,151 words
    Russian History 1917 Russia has always played a major roll in global politics, economics and thought. However, in the past two centuries, Russia has had probably the greatest influence on the international world in modern times, surpassed only by the United States. The Russia that we've known this century though, has its roots in last centuries Russian. At the end of the nineteenth century, Russia experienced great changes internally, politically, socially and spiritually. The half century leading up to the Communist revolution in 1917 was a time filled with sweeping changes, literary triumphs and military defeat. All of these factors played in the eventual revolution and not only affected p ...
    Related: concise history, cultural history, history, russian, russian army, russian history
  • Sign Symbol - 1,179 words
    Sign Symbol A sign system is representation through communication which in turn leads to a shared meaning or understanding. We hold mental representations that classify and organise the world (whether fact or fiction), people, objects and events into meaningful categories so that we can meaningfully comprehend the world. The media use sign systems through newspapers, magazines, television,internet, and the radio etc. The conceptual map of meaning and language are the basis of representation. The conceptual map of meaning, are concepts organised, arranged and classified into complex relations to one another. The conceptual map of meaning although allows you to distinguish your own individual ...
    Related: social conventions, free choice, social change, lazy, interpret
  • Snake By Dh Lawrence - 1,050 words
    Snake by DH Lawrence Michael Giese English IV-4 Mr. Russow SNAKE David Herbert Richards Lawrence was born in Eastwood, Nottinghamshire, England on September 11, 1885. His poem Snake was written while he was living in Taormina, Sicily in 1920. The poem is actually derived from an experience there(Groliers). In all, Lawrence published 11 novels in his lifetime, 5 volumes of plays, 9 volumes of essays, and several short story collections. Of these, Snake was one of his most famous poems. The poem can also be related to Lawrences views and experiences relating to his own life. Lawrences childhood was not a pleasant one. His parents did not get along very well and they were not wealthy. His mothe ...
    Related: lawrence, snake, married life, social conventions, professors
  • Stranger And Meursault - 1,787 words
    ... mothers age proves to be outrageous when compared to the average human beings social and moral standards. But the fact is Meursault is not the average human being. Helene Poplyansky beautifully explained this when she said: Meursault is far from social convention or intellectual problems; what counts for him are his own sensations and desires. He is an outsider not only for others but also for himself. He looks at himself without trying to analyze his actions and their consequences. (Poplyansky 80) By acting the way he did, Meursault almost forced his image as a stranger upon himself. Also, the closest thing to a friend that Meursault had was Raymond. Initially, Raymond appeared as a cru ...
    Related: meursault, stranger, spend time, social conventions, anguish
  • The Awakening - 1,968 words
    The Awakening Carey Coco July 23, 1999 Dr. Jackson English 2070 Kate Chopin and Edna Pontellier as Feminists Kate Chopin is known for her literary works that depict culture in New Orleans, Louisiana, and of women's struggles for freedom. She was born Katherine O'Flaherty in Missouri, and later married Oscar Chopin in 1870. He was a Creole cotton trader from New Orleans. Later they moved to a plantation near Cloutierville, Louisiana, where her husband died in 1882. She returned to Missouri with her six children, and began her writing career. She began writing mostly "local color" stories that earned her consideration as a contributor to Southern regional literature. She later began writing st ...
    Related: awakening, the awakening, story of an hour, kate chopin, explore
  • The Awakening The Birds, The Lovers And The Widow - 516 words
    The Awakening - The Birds, The Lovers And The Widow In the novel, The Awakening there are several motifs or images that assist in developing Edna Pontellier in her "awakening", the birds, the lovers and the woman and black all prove to be important parts in this. It is significant that The Awakening opens with two caged birds. Throughout the novel, Edna feels that marriage enslaves her to an identity she for which she is not suited. The parrot is an expensive bird valued for its beauty. The mockingbird is fairly common and plain, and it is valued for the music it provides. These two birds function as metaphors for the position of women in late Victorian society. Women are valued for their ph ...
    Related: awakening, the awakening, widow, social conventions, victorian woman
  • The Edible Woman - 1,364 words
    The Edible Woman Achieving Personal Identity in Atwoods The Edible Woman In the novel, The Edible Woman by Margaret Atwood, the principal character Marian McAlpine establishes a well-integrated and balanced personality by rejecting the domination of social conventions, and conquering her own passivity. Through this process to self-awareness, Atwood uses imagery and symbolism to effectively parallel Marians journey and caricatures to portray the roles of the consuming society. As Marian stands at a pivotal point in her life, she examines and rejects the roles presented to her by society in order to achieve self-knowledge. She is 26 years old with her education behind her. She has her first jo ...
    Related: edible, edible woman, woman, young woman, self awareness
  • While Much Of Emily Dickinsons Poetry Has Been Described As Sad Or Morose, The Poetess Did Use Humor And Irony In Many Of Her - 1,321 words
    While much of Emily Dickinson's poetry has been described as sad or morose, the poetess did use humor and irony in many of her poems. This essay will address the humor and/ or irony found in five of Dickinson's poems: Faith is a Fine Invention, I'm Nobody! Who are you?, Some keep the Sabbath Going to Church and Success Is Counted Sweetest. The attempt will be made to show how Dickinson used humor and / or irony for the dual purposes of comic relief and to stress an idea or conclusion about her life and environment expressed by the poetess in the respective poem. The most humorous or ironic are some of the shorter poems, such as the four lined stanzas of Faith is a Fine Invention and Success ...
    Related: emily, emily dickinson, humor, irony, poetry
  • Women In Literature - 898 words
    Women In Literature The changing role of women in literature from the late 8th century B. C. to the 4th century A. D. is evident in that women become even more subservient in later works. This is portrayed in the works The Odyssey by Homer and Sakuntala by Kalidasa. Women are treated more like slaves in Sakuntala, while they are seen more like equals in The Odyssey. However, in Sakuntala, women are given more responsibilities, suggesting that people of the time viewed women capable of doing more things and perhaps more intelligent, instead of being seen as ornamental, as in The Odyssey. The Odyssey was written in a time when men played the dominant role. In ancient Greece, women occupied a s ...
    Related: literature, women in literature, young girl, female characters, heroine
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