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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: social control

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  • Social Control - 706 words
    Social Control Both Michel Foucault and Truffaut's depiction of a disciplinary society are nearly identical. But Truffaut's interpretation sees more room for freedom within the disciplinary society. The difference stems from Foucault's belief that the social control in disciplinary pervades all elements of life and there is no escape from this type of control. Foucault's work deals mostly with "power" and his conception of it. Like Nietzsche, Foucault sees power not as a fixed quantity of physical force, but instead as a stream of energy flowing through all aspects of society, its power harnesses itself in regulating the behavior of individuals, the systems of knowledge, a societies institut ...
    Related: social control, michel foucault, society running, modern world, institution
  • Social Control - 706 words
    Social Control Both Michel Foucault and Truffaut's depiction of a disciplinary society are nearly identical. But Truffaut's interpretation sees more room for freedom within the disciplinary society. The difference stems from Foucault's belief that the social control in disciplinary pervades all elements of life and there is no escape from this type of control. Foucault's work deals mostly with "power" and his conception of it. Like Nietzsche, Foucault sees power not as a fixed quantity of physical force, but instead as a stream of energy flowing through all aspects of society, its power harnesses itself in regulating the behavior of individuals, the systems of knowledge, a societies institut ...
    Related: social control, society running, michel foucault, century society, conception
  • Social Control - 706 words
    Social Control Both Michel Foucault and Truffaut's depiction of a disciplinary society are nearly identical. But Truffaut's interpretation sees more room for freedom within the disciplinary society. The difference stems from Foucault's belief that the social control in disciplinary pervades all elements of life and there is no escape from this type of control. Foucault's work deals mostly with"power" and his conception of it. Like Nietzsche, Foucault sees power not as a fixed quantity of physical force, but instead as a stream of energy flowing through all aspects of society, its power harnesses itself in regulating the behavior of individuals, the systems of knowledge, a societies instituti ...
    Related: social control, prison system, century society, modern world, seat
  • Social Control - 706 words
    Social Control Both Michel Foucault and Truffaut's depiction of a disciplinary society are nearly identical. But Truffaut's interpretation sees more room for freedom within the disciplinary society. The difference stems from Foucault's belief that the social control in disciplinary pervades all elements of life and there is no escape from this type of control. Foucault's work deals mostly with "power" and his conception of it. Like Nietzsche, Foucault sees power not as a fixed quantity of physical force, but instead as a stream of energy flowing through all aspects of society, its power harnesses itself in regulating the behavior of individuals, the systems of knowledge, a societies institut ...
    Related: social control, society running, century society, modern world, theater
  • Social Control Of Cyber Space - 1,137 words
    Social Control Of Cyber Space Social Control of Cyberspace B. Pereyra Our nation's infrastructure is daily becoming much more of an abstract environment due to the use of organized cyber criminals hacking away at our super computer information systems. They are generating unpredictable challenges for law enforcement in discovering the unethical abuse on computer systems and a concentration on the young topic of cyber terrorism threatening our criminal justice system. Our law enforcement continues to invent newer methods to function and learn from this new social phenomenon and define cyber terrorism activity as motivation by the rapid growth of technology as a challenge, dominance, and as pl ...
    Related: cyber, cyber terrorism, social control, government agencies, computer crime
  • Social Control Of Cyber Space - 1,115 words
    ... s that someone from a remote terminal using telephone lines had attempted to enter the vast campus computer facility system to destroy the volume table of contents of all the data that was stored in that facility" (Nycum, 4). Luckily, an alert operator forestalled the attack and they were not damaged, but if they had been, $50,000 in 1970 U.S. dollars would have been necessary for the repairs towards the system and recovery of modified or lost data. Since then, institutions around the United States have scattered for solutions to protect themselves from unlawful intrusions and the borderless threats from cyber space. In 1991, the Computer Emergency Response Team at Carnegie Mellon Univer ...
    Related: cyber, social control, private corporations, nervous system, emergency
  • 3 Non Traditional Religions Voodoo, Spiritualism, Cults - 2,024 words
    3 Non Traditional Religions Voodoo, Spiritualism, Cults Religion is primary agent of social control in our society. Due to its communally held beliefs and principles, we have a foundation on which we can rest the laws, values, and the main doctrine, of almost any society. Here in America, we have tremendous freedom in both establishing and in choosing the religion of our choice. This freedom has given birth to many non-traditional religions and practices. When discussing the topic of social control and order within a society, these non-traditional religions can be used very strongly to bring about social change within an individual then into the population. On the rise in our nation, is the ...
    Related: catholic religion, west indies, social change, catholic church, music
  • Chasidim And Old Order Amish: A Comparison - 1,765 words
    Chasidim And Old Order Amish: A Comparison Chasidim and Old Order Amish: A Comparison The two groups to be examined are the Chasidim and the Old Order Amish. We will begin with a brief look at the history of each group. The Chasidim, or Hasidim, as more commonly known, are a cult within the tradition of Judaism. The word Hasid derives from the Hebrew word for pious. Hasidism dates back to the early eighteenth century and originated in central and Eastern Europe. Its founder was a man named Israel ben Eliezer (c.1700-1760). He is otherwise known as the Baal Shem Tov. In Hebrew Baal Shem means, master of the [good] name. It is a title given to men who are endowed with mystical powers. Accordin ...
    Related: comparison, social control, eastern europe, mental retardation, psychological
  • Class, State, And Crime: Social Conflict Perspective - 1,129 words
    Class, State, And Crime: Social Conflict Perspective Michael Merchant Class: Social Psychology Class, State, and Crime : Social Conflict Perspective How does Class, state ,and social controls within a capitalistic society lead to increase crime due to the criminal laws and criminal justice system imposed on the lower middle class. Social conflict theory is the only one out of the vast number of criminology theories that deals directly with this problem. From out of it's Marxist roots arose a theory which challenges the way in which today's society views it's legal system and the implications it has on it's working class citizens. The nature and purpose of social conflict theories is to exami ...
    Related: conflict perspective, conflict theory, social change, social class, social conditions, social conflict, social control
  • Class, State, And Crime: Social Conflict Perspective - 1,103 words
    ... are differences between the social classes in rates of admitted delinquency, measured several ways, consistently showing higher rates on the part of the working-class boy." (McDonald, page 98) Richard Quinney see's criminal justice as a principle feature of the modern advanced capitalist society. The concept of injustice has evolved with the development of capitalism. As economic development goes through different stages the notion of justice gets tied to the basis of production securing the existing order. Capitalist justice regulates the struggle between classes in developing capitalism. "Justice in a capitalist society, today as always, is an ideological and practical instrument in c ...
    Related: conflict perspective, conflict theory, social classes, social conflict, social control, social institutions, social order
  • Crime And Media - 932 words
    Crime And Media Corrections has been a field dominated primarily by men. Women entering in this field have had to struggle against the resistance presented when entering these types of jobs. Criminal justice and women have been terms that have not been heavily associated. However women do play a major role in the criminal justice system, whether they are the offenders, victims or criminal justice professionals. The role of women in criminal justice often depicts women as the victims in order to keep in place the ideologies of women being subordinate, feeble, and unable to take care of themselves against their aggressor. Women are not only victimized women also play roles of the offenders and ...
    Related: crime, media, justice system, police officer, sworn
  • Crime And Prostitutes - 925 words
    Crime and Prostitutes Prostitution is ambiguous to define. The Macquarie dictionary defines prostitution as 1. the act or practice of engaging in sexual intercourse 2. any base or unworthy use of talent, ability, etc. But the act of prostitution involves many other associated facets that are included under this extensive act. There's the act itself, soliciting, advertising, pimping, house brothels, street prostitution, phone sex and even computer sex. Sweden treats prostitution as legal, however pimping is illegal. Canada bans soliciting for prostitution, but not the act themselves. Except for a few places in Nevada, the United States bans prostitution but permits its advertisement and toler ...
    Related: crime, social environment, legal definition, university press, commercial
  • Criminalogical Theories Applied To Monster: The Autobiography Of An La Gang Member - 1,210 words
    Criminalogical Theories Applied To Monster: The Autobiography Of An L.A. Gang Member In Monster: The Autobiography of an L.A. Gang Member, Kody Scott tells the story of the struggle between two significantly large gangs. At the age of eleven he was initiated into the Crips, and committed his first murder. It was this day that began what would become a career for Kody: banging (Scott, 1993). Kody worked hard to secure a reputation for his name. He held loyal to his homeboys and began to build up the Crips. His potential for being in a leadership position became more and more evident as time went on. During one incident, a police officer referred to him as a monster, and the name stuck. He wor ...
    Related: autobiography, gang, learning theory, thomas hobbes, naturally
  • Crittically Examine The Use Of The Term Community - 1,398 words
    Crittically Examine The Use Of The Term Community Critically examine the use of the term community in the 1990s. The essay should be structured in such a way that it incorporates reference to Social Policy, Legislation and practice issues. Students will be required to make use of theoretical studies, particularly from relevant academic and other sources such as books, journals and relevant publications. The meaning of community is a tricky one. It is used in many different contexts and is a concept that means very different things to different people. A useful starting point is in the book Keywords by Raymond Williams. His research on the word community indicates that it has been part of Eng ...
    Related: community care, community development, community education, community policing, examine
  • Deviant Behavior - 1,188 words
    ... ow much their peers and media influence them to go against the norms. Although, once a person is labeled deviant they continue to respond to society as if they are. This aspect of deviance is called the Labeling Theory. They are sociologists who seek to find why certain acts are defined as criminal, and others are not. They also question how and why certain people become defined as a criminal or deviant. The acts that they perform, in this idea, are not significant to the criminals, but it is the social reaction to them that is (Overview 1). The response and label from other individuals in society, such as peers, are how the individuals view themselves. When a person does a deviant act t ...
    Related: criminal behavior, delinquent behavior, deviant, deviant behavior, york harper
  • Elian Gonzalez - 1,966 words
    Elian Gonzalez It seems as if the last five months has been an update of the latest news and developments in the story of the most famous six year old, Elian Gonzalez. To date, I must admit that I have been somewhat biased and inconsiderate by not paying attention to the most recent developments because of the simple fact that I believed from the beginning that the boy should be returned to his biological father, Juan Miguel Gonzalez. With the timing of this assignment it has given me an opportunity to get caught up on all the facts of the Elian Gonzalez case and I'm glad I have taken this opportunity to do some reading of the last couple of reports by Newsweek. It also ties in well with a s ...
    Related: gonzalez, president bill clinton, bill clinton, united states government, clinton
  • Engl: Book Critique Mark Posters The Mode Of Information - 1,359 words
    ... n of traditional Japanese cultural values with American consumer culture. In fact, anywhere where capitalism and consumer culture exist, we can find evidence of what could be seen as the de-centering of identity via the messages and demands of new Media. The individual "freedom" which Poster believes a de-centering of cultural identity via new Media entails raises some doubts questionable, however. Poster believes that through this de-centering force, individuals gain "freedom" from pre-conceived notions of their potential identity and place in the world. Thus the "de-centering" of their previously ordained identity ( ordained in the sense in which it is established for them by their soc ...
    Related: book critique, critique, mark, mode, american consumer
  • Female Genital Mutation - 1,154 words
    Female Genital Mutation Struggling against genital mutilation in Sudan In the country of Sudan, in Northern Africa, there is a procedure that is tradition and is performed on most women called female genital mutilation, or FGM, which used to be known as female circumcision. It has been a normal practice for generations, but is now the subject for international controversy on the morality and safety of this procedure. It is now known that 82 percent of Sudanese woman have an extreme form of genital mutilation done on them, normally at a young age. This form of mutilation is called the Pharaonic form and includes the total removal of the clitoris and labia, and stitching together of the vulva, ...
    Related: female circumcision, female genital mutilation, female sexuality, genital, genital mutilation, mutation
  • Fried Green Tomatoes - 675 words
    Fried Green Tomatoes Film Analysis Fried Green Tomatoes For this paper I have chosen to review the film Fried Green Tomatoes. It is a tale of a small old town, its more popular residents, and a murder mystery told in retrospect by the main character Idggy. I was able to identify several social structures within the small town during the movies flashbacks as well as its modern day narrative setting. There were no government officials present, but a sheriff kept order amongst citizens. That same sheriff, however, partied with the same people that he enforced the law upon. It was the typical small town environment where everyone knew each other and was generally friendly towards one another. Th ...
    Related: fried, green tomatoes, tomatoes, white people, black white
  • From Unilineal Cultural Evolution To Functionalism - 1,037 words
    From Unilineal Cultural Evolution To Functionalism Several anthropological theories emerged during the early twentieth century. Arguably, the most important of these was Functionalism. Bronislaw Malinowski was a prominent anthropologist in Britain during that time and had great influence on the development of this theory. Malinowski suggested that individuals have certain physiological needs and that cultures develop to meet those needs. Malinowski saw those needs as being nutrition, reproduction, shelter, and protection from enemies. He also proposed that there were other basic, culturally derived needs and he saw these as being economics, social control, education, and political organizati ...
    Related: cultural evolution, evolution, functionalism, ruth benedict, social environment
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