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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: social animal

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  • Analysis Of The Underlying Social Psychology - 1,161 words
    ... ople rescued others for various reasons. Some were motivated by a sense of morality. Others had a relationship with a particular person or group and thus, felt a sense of obligation. Some were politically driven and were adamantly opposed to Hitler. Other rescuers were involved at work as diplomats, nurses, social workers, and doctors, and thus were conditioned to continue their involvement beyond their professional obligation. This is where cognitive dissonance comes into effect in this instance. These people were raised to help, it was a part of their moral fabric. To go against that learned belief would cause dissonance, therefore, these people had it woven into them to rescue, to hel ...
    Related: psychology, social animal, social psychology, social workers, underlying
  • Animal Behavior - 2,294 words
    ... cle. Although, there were no consistent intervals between breaks, they did range between five and l0 minutes apart. Furthermore, every time the trout moved, it always returned to the same position it left from. Conveniently, the trout may have used the three stones at the base of it's schooling position as a marker Also, the school showed something that resembled a hierarchy of order. It appeared that the larger fished floated toward the bottom, while the smaller fished floated at the top. During the observation period, the fish dispersed in a rapid manner on three occasions. On the first random dispersement, no significant signal was apparent. However during the second rapid dispersion! ...
    Related: animal behavior, social animal, food chain, more important, component
  • Explain The Views Of Locke - 989 words
    Explain The Views Of Locke INTRODUCTION The life-blood of philosophy is argument and counter-argument. Plato and Aristotle thought of this as what they called dialectic discussion. D. W. Hamlyn JOHN LOCKE (1632-1704) Locke was the first of the British empiricists who held that our concepts and our knowledge are based on experience. He forms his system of knowledge with empiricist idioms, namely: all knowledge comes to us through experience. "No man's knowledge here can go beyond his experience." There is no such thing as innate ideas; there is no such thing as moral precepts; we are born with an empty mind, with a soft tablet ready to be written upon by experimental impressions. Locke was a ...
    Related: john locke, locke, innate ideas, private property, consciousness
  • Friendship And God - 1,695 words
    Friendship And God Human beings are social creatures. They strive for companionship with others. Although there are some people that might find pleasure in solitude, it seems clear that the majority of people do seek companionship if possible. Central among these companionships are friendships. For some people, this is what makes life worthwhile, the presence of friends. Friendship is a sort of goodness, or at the least implies it. When taking a closer, more specific look at this kind of relationship, one is not only able to create connotations for the word, but are also able to experience the true advantages gained through the virtue of friendship. Friendship in essence is what really measu ...
    Related: friendship, good luck, married life, ideal self, lunch
  • Human Nature - 1,424 words
    Human Nature Is there or is there not human nature? For Charles Darwin the answer is no. Darwin was the first to introduce the concept of evolution. He believed that humans evolved from the ape and not in the image of God. Darwin contradicted Aristotle's view that man has a purpose in life -to reason. For Darwin, man has no purpose. According to Darwin, man began as one of a few species on this planet, fighting for survival. Man was better equipped with certain traits that allowed him to pass through the filters of natural selection. Man's physical and intellectual traits allowed him to surpass all over species, thus becoming the greatest predator and severely diminishing the risk of man bec ...
    Related: human beings, human condition, human nature, human personality, human population
  • John Locke Theory Of Property - 1,946 words
    John Locke Theory Of Property Perhaps one of, if not the, most historically influential political thinkers of the western world was John Locke. John Locke, the man who initiated what is now known as British Empiricism, is also considered highly influential in establishing grounds, theoretically at least, for the constitution of the United States of America. The basis for understanding Locke is that he sees all people as having natural God given rights. As God's creations, this denotes a certain equality, at least in an abstract sense. This religious back drop acts as a the foundation for all of Locke's theories, including his theories of individuality, private property, and the state. The re ...
    Related: john locke, locke, private property, united states of america, parental authority
  • Little White Lie - 1,904 words
    Little White Lie Orwell & Marx Animalism vs. Marxism Every line I have written since 1936 has been written, directly or indirectly, against totalitarianism, quotes George Orwell in the preface to the 1956 Signet Classic edition of Animal Farm. The edition, which sold several millions copies, however, omitted the rest of the sentence: and for democratic Socialism, as I understand it. It is in Animal Farm, written in 1944 but not published until after World War Two in 1945, which Orwell offers a political and social doctrine whose ideas and ideols can be seen in all of his proceeding works. In an essay published in the summer of 1946 entitled Why I Write, Orwell claimed to have been motivated ...
    Related: boxer rebellion, human life, democratic socialism, orwell, josef
  • Marty Pelletier - 1,011 words
    Marty Pelletier annon Channels of Identification When we see stories on the news of children murdering each other, what must we think in terms of responsibility and which influences contributed to the decisions which left four children and a teacher dead? Who is responsible? How do we as individuals make decisions? What in our culture influences our behavior and impacts our value systems? More specifically, what exactly does it mean to be influenced? I have chosen television as my focus because I feel it is the most successful media in terms of sculpting social values and, therefore, social relations. The examination of the television industry, with an emphasis on communication (through perc ...
    Related: marty, value systems, social values, social animal, organisms
  • Plato Vs Aristotle - 1,043 words
    Plato Vs. Aristotle Regime Change We have two great philosophers, Plato and Aristotle. These are great men, whose ideas have not been forgotten over years. Although their thoughts of politics were similar, we find some discrepancies in their teachings. The ideas stem from Socrates to Plato to Aristotle. Plato based moral knowledge on abstract reason, while Aristotle grounded it on experience and tried to apply it more to concrete living. Both ways of life are well respected by many people today. Plato started his teachings in remembrance of his good friend, Socrates. After his death he traveled back to Italy and studied under Pythagoras. Some years later he began "The Academy". Much of the c ...
    Related: aristotle, aristotle plato, plato, different aspects, political science
  • The Explanation Of Criminality - 2,387 words
    The Explanation Of Criminality From a sociological perspective, explanations for criminal- ity are found in two levels which are the subculture and the structural explanations. The sociological explanations emphasize aspects of societal arrangements that are external to the actor and compelling. A sociological explanation is concerned with how the structure of a society or its institutional practices or its persisting cultural themes affect the conduct of its members. Individual differences are denied or ignored, and the explanation of the overall collective behavoir is sought in the patterning of social arrangements that is considered to be both outside the actor and prior to him (Sampson, ...
    Related: criminality, explanation, social order, social life, dwelling
  • Tolstoys Confessions: What Is The Aim Of Human Life - 1,407 words
    ... "Prudence is the ability to discern the becoming ends of human conduct and the morally good act in all contingencies of life."(Man, p. 155) In other words, prudence is the ability to reason correctly about things that are done here and now. Aquinas agrees on this point in the Summa Theologica in the first part of the second book, question 61, article 2. (Philo. , p 565) "It orders man to his last end and makes clear the golden mean of other virtues." (Man, p. 155) Its object is reason, which leads man to human nature adequately understood and therefore leads him to his end. The reason allows each of the virtues to function properly by making the work of reason done well. An example is fo ...
    Related: human conduct, human life, human nature, human sexuality, single parent
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