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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: slaughterhouse

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  • Slaughterhouse Five - 1,045 words
    Slaughterhouse Five Vonnegut's When one begins to analyze a military novel it is important to first look at the historical context in which the book was written. On the nights of February 13-14 in 1944 the city of Dresden, Germany was subjected to one of the worst air attacks in the history of man. By the end of the bombing 135,000 to 250,000 people had been killed by the combined forces of the United States and the United Kingdom. Dresden was different then Berlin or many of the other military targets which were attacked during World War II because it was never fortified or used for strategic purposes and, therefore, was not considered a military target. Because of it's apparent safety, tho ...
    Related: slaughterhouse, slave market, billy pilgrim, united kingdom, exhibit
  • Slaughterhouse Five - 1,054 words
    ... ok Billy Pilgrim does not have to feel remorse for being saved because that is how it was and always will happen. He does not have to feel guilt or remorse because there is no reason to. There is nothing that can be done about war and death, they are as easy to stop as glaciers. (Vonnegut 3) The death of all those innocent people could not be stopped, it was predetermined by some unknown force just as the destruction of the Universe, by a Tralfamadorian testing a new fuel, is also predetermined and unstoppable. Vonnegut uses irony by having Billy Pilgrim an Optometrist, whose job it is to help others see the world more clearly with greater acuity and sensitivity. Billy believes it his jo ...
    Related: slaughterhouse, human life, free will, billy pilgrim, flew
  • Slaughterhouse Five - 951 words
    Slaughterhouse - Five Slaughterhouse-Five 1. Explore the use of So it goes. Is it to be viewed as resignation to the horrors of death? Is it Billy's response? Vonnegut's? Yours? So it goes is Billy Pilgrims theory regarding death. He is simply saying that death is no big deal. Since he saw so much death in World War II, and witnessed a bombing two times as worse as Hiroshima, he deals with death much differently than others. Because of everything he has gone through, Billy has become numb to death. It has become a regular situation in his life. Billy first uses this saying on page 2, when he is talking about the death of Gerhard Mullers mother. Because Billy often travels to and from Tralfam ...
    Related: slaughterhouse, stock market, american history, cape cod, permanent
  • Slaughterhouse Five - 311 words
    Slaughterhouse Five Slaughterhouse five is a very complex and twisted story about a World War Two veteran. The story is set in three different time periods of his life. His name is Billy Pilgrim and he lives in Ilium New York. Billy graduated high school in the top third of his class. He attended night school at the Ilium School of Optometry. Soon after he was drafted and his father died while hunting. During war he was a chaplains assistant. While serving he saw some action and was captured by the Germans. He met a fat antitank gunner named Roland Weary. He wasnt very popular or liked by people. They were taken to a prison with one hundred other American POWs. They were shipped by train for ...
    Related: slaughterhouse, billy pilgrim, high school, serving, coat
  • Slaughterhouse Five - 358 words
    Slaughterhouse Five This first chapter, a preface, is insistent on the fact that the book is based on real events. Vonnegut, like our narrator, is a veteran of World War II, a former prisoner of war, and a witness to a great massacre, and that fact lends a certain authority to what follows. Vonnegut shares with us his enduring inability to render in writing the horror of Dresden. There is nothing intelligent to say about a massacre, yet he feels the need to say something. The book unabashedly charts the author's struggle to find a way to write about what he saw in a way that neither belittles nor glorifies it. This struggle we keep in the back of our minds as we proceed to read of Billy Pilg ...
    Related: slaughterhouse, world war ii, billy pilgrim, kurt vonnegut, vonnegut
  • Animal Farm - 1,292 words
    Animal Farm The Importance of Squealer Sly, greedy, and crafty are just a few characteristics that describe Squealer in the book Animal Farm by George Orwell. This pig is also a messenger, an actor, a great persuasive speaker, a follower, and an outstanding liar. He's nimble, he's clever, he's manipulative and most of all he's sneaky. Squealer uses his intelligence to persuade the other animals on the farm into doing what Napoleon wants, even if they don't really want to do it. He uses his craftiness and cunning to persuade the animals into thinking that he is on their side and he's doing all he can to help them out. His acting ability misleads the animals into thinking that he's one of thei ...
    Related: animal farm, farm, book reports, george orwell, follower
  • Anti War Themes In Catch 22 Slaughter House Five And Night - 1,288 words
    ... he landed a contract with the Germansto bomb his own outfit (Heller 267). The whole base was destroyed; Milo was forgiven soon after the bombing because he told the soldiers how much money he had made for them. After reading this section one is appalled at the inhumanity exhibited by the characters in the book. The theme of inhumanity is evident throughout the rest of the book; many of the characters display this theme through their inhumane actions. The anti-war theme in the book Catch-22 is perpetuated by the satiric lack of rationality all the characters, except for Yossarian, have. Yossarian is one of the few sane people in the book. Throughout the book, the repetition of ridiculous ...
    Related: catch, catch 22, random house, slaughter, slaughter house
  • Atomic - 2,303 words
    Atomic Bomb Then a tremendous flash of light cut across the sky . Mr. Tanimoto has a distinct recollection that it traveled from east to west, from the city toward the hills. It seemed like a sheet of sun. РJohn Hersey, from Hiroshima, pp.8 On August 6, 1945, the world changed forever. On that day the United States of America detonated an atomic bomb over the city of Hiroshima. Never before had mankind seen anything like. Here was something that was slightly bigger than an ordinary bomb, yet could cause infinitely more destruction. It could rip through walls and tear down houses like the devils wrecking ball. In Hiroshima it killed 100,000 people, most non-military civilians. Three day ...
    Related: atomic, atomic bomb, albert einstein, cuban missile, eliminate
  • Bovine Tmb - 1,501 words
    Bovine TMB Bovine Tuberculosis Mycobacterium bovis (Bovine Tuberculosis) (or cattle Tuberculosis) was first discovered by Columella (Louis Junius Moderatus Columella) which was born in Cadiz, Spain and resided in Northern Italy when he discovered the bovine Tuberculosis in the year 14 A D. In 1882 Robert Koch discovered that the connection between human and animal Tuberculosis actually were established. When Koch realized that children were becoming infected from contaminated cows milk most nations brought out legal instruments designed to remove chronically infected animals and take a look at the public health aspect of the problem. The Disease Mycobacterium bovis is the bacterium that caus ...
    Related: bovine, control programs, new zealand, most effective, confirmation
  • Cats Cradle - 964 words
    CatS Cradle In questioning the value of literary realism, Flannery O'Connor has written, "I am interested in making a good case for distortion because it is the only way to make people see." Kurt Vonnegut writes pessimistic novels, or at least he did back in the sixties. Between Slaughterhouse Five, Mother Night, and Cat's Cradle, Vonnegut paints a cynical and satirical picture of the degradation of society using distortion as the primary means to express himself. In Cat's Cradle, the reader is confronted with the story of the narrator, John, as he attempts to gather material to write a book on the human aspect of the day Japan was bombed. As the story progresses, he finds that becomes incre ...
    Related: cats, cradle, general electric company, flannery o'connor, calling
  • Do We Really Love Our Animals - 1,263 words
    ... n part because they are immobile, yet suffer because of the inability to move...Chickens are cheap, cages are expensive"(Why Vegan? 2) Animals are usually locked up in buildings with no windows crowed with hundreds to tens of thousands of other animals. They are also subject to extreme weather conditions, such as extreme heat and extreme cold. Animals have been genetically mutated to become higher yielding products. These murders use methods like gene splicing, and selective breeding. There are also hormones administrated as well as unnatural feeding schedules. It is truly repugnant to think of the effects of genetic mutation on animals. I have seen cows with breasts unnaturally huge to ...
    Related: animal rights, animal rights movement, death comes, ethical treatment, slaughterhouse
  • Examine Critically The Dramatic Structure And Relevance Of The Cassandra Scene In The Agamemnon - 1,240 words
    Examine Critically The Dramatic Structure And Relevance Of The Cassandra Scene In The Agamemnon Examine critically the dramatic structure and relevance of the Cassandra scene in the Agamemnon. BY SARAH SIKKES. Cassandra, was a daughter of Hecuba and King Priam, the rulers of Troy during the Trojan War according to Homer's Iliad. Cassandra was a beautiful young woman, blessed with the gift of prophecy by Apollo, who was infatuated with her. Unfortunately, she shunned Apollo at the last minute and he added a twist to her gift; Cassandra was doomed to tell the truth, but never to be believed. I promised consent to Apollo but broke my word... and ever since that fault I could persuade no one. [A ...
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  • Group 1 - 1,748 words
    Group1 1 OUR FOOD SYSTEM After a long hard day of work you sit down in your comfortable recliner and open up your favorite snack. But when you reach into grab a piece, you pull out a dead bug. Suddenly many thoughts come into your mind, you wonder how did the bug get there and was it dead or alive. Is it harmful or carry a disease. You ask yourself did the bug come from the United States or another country and where was your snack made? As all these questions come into your head, you wonder who can give you the answers. Fortunately, the government thought about these conflicts and established several governmental agencies to protect Americans in food safety. These agencies are responsible fo ...
    Related: environmental protection, president abraham lincoln, department of agriculture, parasites, consumers
  • How Kurt Vonneguts Life Efected His Work - 604 words
    How Kurt Vonnegut's Life Efected His Work. Kurt Vonnegut Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. was born in Indianapolis in 1922. His father was an architect, his mother a noted beauty. Both spoke German, but wouldn't teach Kurt the language because of all the anti-German sentiment following the first World War. While in high school, Vonnegut edited the school's daily newspaper. He attended Cornell for a little over two years and wrote for the Cornell Daily Sun. In 1942, he was drafted into the U.S. Army. In 1944, his mother committed suicide and he was taken prisoner following the Battle of the Bulge. After the war, Vonnegut entered a Masters program in anthropology at the University of Chicago. His thesis, ti ...
    Related: kurt, kurt vonnegut, good and evil, cold war, spoke
  • King Henri Iv - 1,349 words
    King Henri IV King Henri IV was born at Pau in Bearn on December 13, 1553. Raised by his mother, Jeane dAlbret (Queen of Navarre), Henri was brought up in a remote castle in the Pyrenees. He grew up amongst the peasant children of that area and raised on a diet of bread, cheese, and garlic. As a youngster Henri was brought up in the Protestant faith, which was the opposite of his fathers wishes. As result, Henri was taken to Paris on his fathers orders and given a Catholic tutor. However, he stubbornly refused to attend Mass. Consequently, after the death of his father, Henri was once again instructed by a Protestant tutor. By the age of ten, Henri had already changed religions twice. Remain ...
    Related: henri, king charles, king henry, king of france, good company
  • Kurt Vonnegut - 686 words
    Kurt Vonnegut Kurt Vonneguts character Billy Pilgrim, in Slaughterhouse-Five, is an American soldier in Europe in the last year of World War II. What he sees and does during his six months on the battlefield and as a prisoner of war have dominated his life. He comes to terms with the feelings of horror, guilt, and despair that are the result of his war experiences by putting the events of his life in perspective. He reorganizes his life by using the device of "time travel." Unlike everyone else, he does not live his life one day after another. Billy Pilgrim has become "unstuck in time," and he jumps around among the periods of life in a constant state of transience. In the beginning of the n ...
    Related: kurt, kurt vonnegut, vonnegut, world war ii, post traumatic stress
  • Kurt Vonnegut: A Canary In A Coal Mine - 1,197 words
    Kurt Vonnegut: A Canary in a Coal Mine Kurt Vonnegut Served as a sensitive cell in the organism of American Society during the 1960's. His work alerted the public about the absurdity of modern warfare and an increasingly mechanized and impersonal society in which humans were essentially worthless and degenerated. The satirical tone and sardonic humor allowed people to read his works and laugh at their own misfortune. Vonnegut was born on November 11, 1922, in Indianapolis, where he was reared. His father was an architect, as his grandfather had been. Though the family's fortune was eroded during the Depression-his father went without an architectural commission from 1929 to 1940-they were we ...
    Related: coal, kurt, kurt vonnegut, mine, mark twain
  • Kurt Vonnegut: A Canary In A Coal Mine - 1,197 words
    Kurt Vonnegut: A Canary in a Coal Mine Kurt Vonnegut Served as a sensitive cell in the organism of American Society during the 1960's. His work alerted the public about the absurdity of modern warfare and an increasingly mechanized and impersonal society in which humans were essentially worthless and degenerated. The satirical tone and sardonic humor allowed people to read his works and laugh at their own misfortune. Vonnegut was born on November 11, 1922, in Indianapolis, where he was reared. His father was an architect, as his grandfather had been. Though the family's fortune was eroded during the Depression-his father went without an architectural commission from 1929 to 1940-they were we ...
    Related: coal, kurt, kurt vonnegut, mine, public relations
  • Kurt Vonnegut: A Canary In A Coal Mine - 1,197 words
    Kurt Vonnegut: A Canary in a Coal Mine Kurt Vonnegut Served as a sensitive cell in the organism of American Society during the 1960's. His work alerted the public about the absurdity of modern warfare and an increasingly mechanized and impersonal society in which humans were essentially worthless and degenerated. The satirical tone and sardonic humor allowed people to read his works and laugh at their own misfortune. Vonnegut was born on November 11, 1922, in Indianapolis, where he was reared. His father was an architect, as his grandfather had been. Though the family's fortune was eroded during the Depression-his father went without an architectural commission from 1929 to 1940-they were we ...
    Related: coal, kurt, kurt vonnegut, mine, george orwell
  • Kurt Vonnegut: A Canary In A Coal Mine - 1,244 words
    ... are or not. (((quote from GBYMR))) -"All writers are going to have to learn more about science, simply because the scientific method is such an important part of their environment." (p. 7 CWV) He goes on to cite that H.L. Mencken and H.G. Wells, two writers for whom he has great respect, started out as chemists. -"Ive stayed fairly loyal to the Midwest in my work." (p. 8 CWV) -"I don't plot my books rigidly, follow a preconceived structure. A novel mustn't be a closed system-it's a quest." (p. 9 CWV) -He was a relentless pacifist long before it was fashionable, and he distrusts institutions as though he were a college student. -Vonnegut believes that the only thing humor can do is comfor ...
    Related: coal, kurt, kurt vonnegut, mine, h. g. wells
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