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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: behavioral

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  • Behavioral - 646 words
    Behavioral Conditioning What I want to do is train my dog to shake with either paw upon request. If I say "right" I want him to raise his right paw and the same for the left. I would use operant and classical conditioning to reach the goal of teaching this trick to my dog. I must condition the dog to shake by using positive reinforcement. The dog (Max) already puts his paw on me when I grab his head so I will act like I am going to reach for his head and when he puts his paw on me I will say, "shake." Every time he puts his paw on me after I say shake I will give him a liver treat. Once I have conditioned him to shake it will then be time to differentiate right from left. I want the words, " ...
    Related: behavioral, operant conditioning, unconditioned stimulus, positive reinforcement, interval
  • Behavioral Learning - 982 words
    Behavioral Learning BEHAVIORAL LEARNING THEORIES Educational Psychology Journal Article Presentation Most theorists agree that learning occurs when experience causes a change in a person's knowledge or behavior . Behaviorists emphasize the role of environmental stimuli in learning and focus on the behavior, i.e., an observable response. Behavioral theories are based on contiguity, classical and operant conditioning, applied behavior analysis, social learning theory and self-regulation/cognitive behavior modification. Early views of learning were contiguity and classical conditioning. In contiguity learning, two events are repeatedly paired together and become associated in the learner's mind ...
    Related: behavioral, classroom learning, learning process, learning theories, learning theory, observational learning, social learning
  • Behavioral Theory - 594 words
    Behavioral Theory One of the problems with strict behavioral theory is that it very much ignores the human variable. When we reduce things strictly to stimulus and response, we can easily forget that there are human feelings, thoughts, and cognitions that are involved in the expression of a behavior as well. In the case of Roger a behaviorist will take everything at face value. If Roger comes in and says he is having trouble studying, it is very likely that the behaviorist will agree with him based on the observable evidence and come up with a reinforcement contingency of some sort to correct his problem. However, the behaviorist is not likely to explore Rogers motivations, interests, or his ...
    Related: behavioral, business school, face value, therapist, likewise
  • Emotional And Behavioral Disorders In Children - 1,367 words
    Emotional And Behavioral Disorders In Children Coping with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders When defining students with emotional or behavioral disorders one may encounter difficulties because it is such a broad topic. There are many divisions and subdivisions of this issue. Children are presented with many different disorders and tribulations, however when these disorders are detected early and with immediate attention, their situation may be remedied. A child afflicted with emotional or behavioral disorders may exhibit signs of poor self confidence. This may lead to, but not necessarily related to, social withdrawal, task avoidance, frustration or anxiety. About three to five percent of ...
    Related: behavioral, behavioral disorders, disorders, school problems, learning style
  • Innovations In Behavioral Marketing And - 3,117 words
    Innovations In Behavioral Marketing And MARKETING MANAGEMENT TERM PROJECT Innovations in Behavioral Marketing and Electronic Commerce Date: June 15, 2000 Table of Contents Preface1 . Introduction . Benefits of Electronic Marketing . Effectiveness of E-Commerce I. Ways for Promoting your Website II. Learning about your Visitors III. Segmenting your Internet Market . E-Commerce in Lebanon I. Lebanese Companies on the Net II. Customer Adaptation to E-Commerce Websites . Conclusion I. Introduction An online marketing channel is one that a person can reach via computer and modem. A modem connects a computer to a telephone line so that the computer user can reach various online information se ...
    Related: behavioral, direct marketing, internet marketing, marketing, marketing campaign, marketing channel, marketing plan
  • Innovations In Behavioral Marketing And - 3,064 words
    ... . Monitor E-Mail Inquiries and Complaints It is vital that you find a way to monitor e-mail inquiries and complaints from your site visitors. Even if you have an employee handle this e-mail for you, have them print out an extract of key questions and complaints so you can keep your finger on the pulse. We have found that my blind sides are quickly spotted by visitors, who'll fire off an e-mail. Do not look at these e-mails as enemy fire; these are your friends who will help you improve your site. When you spot a question occurring repeatedly, it is a sign that you need to deal with it more fully or more visibly on your site. And, it tells you what is important to your visitors. 2. Provid ...
    Related: behavioral, internet marketing, marketing, marketing plan, marketing strategy
  • Johnson Behavioral System Jbs Model - 1,159 words
    Johnson Behavioral System (JBS) Model In this paper, I am going to summarize the Johnson Behavioral System (JBS) Model (Johnson, 1980, 1990), explain the perspectives for nursing practice, and explore its applicability in nursing practice. First, I am going to talk a little about Dorothy E. Johnson the nurse that wrote the Model. Dorothy E. Johnson was born August 21, 1919, in Savannah, Georgia (Lobo, 1995). She received her A.A. from Armstrong Junior College in Savannah, Georgia, in 1938; her B.S.N. from Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee, in 1942; and her M.P.H. from Harvard University in Boston in 1948 (Conner, Harbour, Magers, and Watt 1994). Johnson was an instructor and an a ...
    Related: behavioral, johnson, system theory, knowledge base, medical college
  • Johnson Behavioral System Jbs Model - 1,124 words
    ... ds to diagnose to a subsystem rather than a specific problem. Johnson's Model states that it is at this point when the nurse is needed in order to return the client to homeostasis (Conner et al., 1994). Application in Nursing Practice The application of any nursing model to practice requires three conditions: the model's congruence with practice requirements, its comprehensive development in relation to practice requirements, and its specificity in relation to practice requirements. These conditions governing a nursing model's applicability should be understood to enable practitioners to appropriately and effectively use models in practice (Derdiarian, 1993). What is nursing practice and ...
    Related: behavioral, johnson, professional practice, st louis, sufficient
  • 3 Non Traditional Religions Voodoo, Spiritualism, Cults - 2,024 words
    3 Non Traditional Religions Voodoo, Spiritualism, Cults Religion is primary agent of social control in our society. Due to its communally held beliefs and principles, we have a foundation on which we can rest the laws, values, and the main doctrine, of almost any society. Here in America, we have tremendous freedom in both establishing and in choosing the religion of our choice. This freedom has given birth to many non-traditional religions and practices. When discussing the topic of social control and order within a society, these non-traditional religions can be used very strongly to bring about social change within an individual then into the population. On the rise in our nation, is the ...
    Related: catholic religion, west indies, social change, catholic church, music
  • A Review Of Personal Relationships After Sexual Victimization - 811 words
    A Review Of Personal Relationships After Sexual Victimization A Review of Relationships After Sexual Victimization Abstract Flangan and Furman conducted two studies to examine the links between sexual victimization and perceptions of romantic, parental, and peer relationships. An attachment perspective is proposed for understanding the impact of sexual victimization on close relationships for both high school and college students. Many adolescent and young women experience some form of undesired or forced sexual experience with strangers or acquaintances. Anything from unwanted touching to rape would be considered a forced sexual encounter. The literature on college and older women shows tha ...
    Related: personal relationships, relationships, sexual, sexual behavior, sexual satisfaction, social relationships, victimization
  • Abraham Maslow - 1,910 words
    Abraham Maslow ABRAHAM MASLOW Born April1,1908 Abraham Maslow was the oldest of seven children born to his parents in Brooklyn New York. Feeling pressure from his parents to achieve academic greatness, Abraham went through early childhood with few friends. Focusing mainly on his studies Maslow had a quiet and unfulfilling adolescence. Abraham started off his college career by attending city college in New York were he began to study law, as his father had wanted him to do. He soon lost interest and transferred to the University of Wisconsin and studied psychology. Here Maslow received, in 1934, his Ph.D. During his college career Abraham married his cousin Bertha Goodman, his parents did not ...
    Related: abraham, abraham maslow, maslow, social order, third force
  • Academic Effects - 950 words
    Academic Effects In the spring of 1997, Lisa Sharon Cushing and Craig H. Kennedy conducted an experiment to study the academic effects of providing peer support in general education classrooms on students without disabilities. In other words, students were paired with other students and their behavior observed. The study was undertaken to better understand the effects of peer support stratigies of participating students. Three non-disabled students were observed and a baseline measure of academic engagement was taken. Each student was paired to be a peer supporter with a disabled student and that level of behavior was observed. The experimental question states: Does serving as a peer support ...
    Related: academic, negative effect, positive effects, extraneous variables, english class
  • Addadhd - 1,128 words
    ADD/ADHD Factual Data Attention deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD) refers to a group of symptoms that begin in infancy and can continue into adulthood, causing difficulties for people at home, at school, at their jobs, and within their communities. The severity of symptoms varies among people with ADHD. Some people have difficulty with overactivity (hyperactivity), while others have difficulty remembering, thinking, making judgments, and solving problems. The most common symptom of ADHD is difficulty remaining focused on a task until it is completed. People with ADHD have a hard time completing tasks that are boring, repetitive, or difficult for them. Many people with ADHD have trouble cont ...
    Related: deficit hyperactive disorder, social behavior, personal relationships, relationships, norepinephrine
  • Adjustment Disorder With Depressed Mood - 1,468 words
    Adjustment Disorder With Depressed Mood Running Head: ADJUSTMENT DISORDER WITH DEPRESSED MOOD CAUSE Adjustment Disorder with Depressed Mood, Cause and Affect Abstract Research was conducted to investigate Adjustment Disorder with Depressed Mood, and some causes, affects, and treatment approaches. Not all individuals manifest or demonstrate the same depressive symptoms, which can make it difficult for clinicians to diagnose and treat. The American Psychiatric Association has categorized various depressive disorders in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders fourth edition (DSM-IV, 1994). Researchers have investigated the validity of the DSM diagnostic criteria over the year ...
    Related: adjustment, depressed, disorder, mood, treating depression
  • Adlerian Psychotherapy: An Overview Of Theory And Practice - 1,200 words
    Adlerian Psychotherapy: An Overview Of Theory And Practice Abstract Understand, interpret, direct. This statement is an oversimplification of sorts, but defines the essence of Adlerian psychotherapy. From this minimal overview of Adlerian theory, we can begin to elaborate and explore the intricacies of individual psychology. Adlerians are concerned with understanding the unique and private beliefs and strategies of the individual (private logic and mistaken notions) that we create in childhood, and which serve as a reference for attitudes, private views of self, others and the world, and behavior (lifestyle). Therapeutic work with clients involves short-term and intensive work to increase so ...
    Related: overview, personal growth, self concept, holistic approach, perfection
  • Adlerian Psychotherapy: An Overview Of Theory And Practice - 1,190 words
    ... odify behavior. The goal of the therapy is to stimulate cognitive, affective and behavior change. Although the individual is not always fully aware of their specific goal, through analysis of birth order, repeated coping patterns and earliest memories, the psychotherapist infers the goal as a working hypothesis. The client approaches control of feelings and emotions. First, the client recognizes what kind of feeling he or she is having (angriness, sadness, frustration, etc). Once the client sees and knows the feeling; then he or she will try to imagine or think of something pleasant that had happened to him or her, replacing the bad feeling for a good one. By doing this, the client is in ...
    Related: overview, cognitive behavioral, behavior change, conflict resolution, adler
  • Aggression - 2,625 words
    Aggression Aggression 1 Running Head: AGGRESSION Aggression: Dealing with the Aspects that we are faced with Day in and Day Out Aggression 2 Abstract We live in a society where aggressive acts happen every day, but do we really know what causes it? How can we help ourselves and others to understand what aggression is? First off, we need to define aggression, tell it's causes and effects and determine the best way to deal with it. For example, aggression can be positive or negative, accidental or intended and physical or mental. Aggression is a continuing behavior in our world today and I feel that it is very important that we try to start controlling it now. Aggression 3 Aggression is a crit ...
    Related: aggression, human aggression, social environment, social psychology, expresses
  • Aggression - 2,627 words
    ... Running Head: AGGRESSION Aggression: Dealing with the Aspects that we are faced with Day in and Day Out Natalie Grow York College Aggression 2 Abstract We live in a society where aggressive acts happen every day, but do we really know what causes it? How can we help ourselves and others to understand what aggression is? First off, we need to define aggression, tell it's causes and effects and determine the best way to deal with it. For example, aggression can be positive or negative, accidental or intended and physical or mental. Aggression is a continuing behavior in our world today and I feel that it is very important that we try to start controlling it now. Aggression 3 Aggression is ...
    Related: aggression, human aggression, social psychology, over time, negatively
  • Aggression Biological Theory Vs Behaviorist Theory - 1,254 words
    Aggression - Biological Theory vs Behaviorist Theory Aggression is a problem that affects all members of society. There is no doubt that aggression pays off for some. Parents who yell and threaten punishment get results. The child who hits the hardest gets the toy. The brother who is willing to be the most vicious in a fight wins. The teacher who gives the hardest test and threatens to flunk the most students usually gets the most study time from students. The spouse who threatens to get the maddest gets their way. The male who acts the most macho and aggressive gets the praise of certain groups of males. For decades psychologists have attempted to find the causes of aggression. The focus of ...
    Related: aggression, aggression in children, behaviorist, biological, biological factors
  • Aggressive Behavior - 1,312 words
    Aggressive Behavior Aggression is a behavioral characteristic that refers to forceful actions or procedures (such a deliberate attack) with intentions to dominate or master. It tends to be hostile, injurious, or destructive, and is often motivated by frustration (The Merriam-Webster Dictionary, 1995). For an individual, aggressive behavior is considered understandable and normal under appropriate circumstances, but when it is frequent, intense, lasting, and pervasive, it is more likely to be a symptom of a mental disorder. Likewise, aggression between groups, can be in the form of healthy competition, but can become harmful when unfair or unjust disadvantage or frustration is perceived, lead ...
    Related: abnormal behavior, aggressive, aggressive behavior, behavioral therapy, social norms
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