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  • Digital Photography, Which Is Also Called Digital Imaging Since It Does Not Involve The Use Of Film Started In The Sixties Th - 1,144 words
    Digital photography, which is also called digital imaging since it does not involve the use of film started in the sixties. The original development of the technology is at NASA when they required that exploration spacecraft, unable to return to earth, to be capable of sending back pictures of their voyages. The digital camera, like the standard film camera, uses a lens to focus the image on a sensor. The usual film camera depends on a film to capture the image but the digital relies on a sensor, either CCD or CMOS . As light hits the pixels that make up the sensor, it is converted to a current that is then sent to the Analogue to Digital Converter or A-D converter. When a photo is digitised ...
    Related: digital, digital camera, film, imaging, involve, sixties
  • Film Contributions Of The Sixties - 1,630 words
    Film Contributions Of The Sixties Beginning roughly with the release of Stanley Kubrick's Dr. Strangelove: Or How I Stopped Worrying and Loved the Bomb in 1964, and continuing for about the next decade, the "Sixties" era of filmmaking made many lasting impressions on the motion picture industry. Although editing and pacing styles varied greatly from Martin Scorcesse's hyperactive pace, to Kubrick's slow methodical pace, there were many uniform contributions made by some of the era's seminal directors. In particular, the "Sixties" saw the return of the auteur, as people like Francis Ford Coppola and Stanley Kubrick wrote and directed their own screenplays, while Woody Allen wrote, directed an ...
    Related: film, sixties, space odyssey, short history, lenses
  • Sixties - 1,022 words
    Sixties In 1962, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. said his most famous words: "I have a dream." He was not the only one who felt this way. For many, the 1960s was a decade in which their dreams about America might be fulfilled. For Martin Luther King Jr., this was a dream of a truly equal America; for John F. Kennedy, it was a dream of a young vigorous nation that would put a man on the moon; and for the hippy movement, it was one of love, peace, and freedom. The 1960s was a tumultuous decade of social and political upheaval. We are still confronting many social issues that were addressed in the 1960s today. In spite of the turmoil, there were some positive results, such as the civil rights revol ...
    Related: sixties, rights movement, richard nixon, higher education, assassination
  • Sixties Counterculture: 10 Pg Proposal - 1,720 words
    Sixties Counterculture: 10 Pg Proposal The sixties were turbulent times for America, both domestically and abroad. During the sixties America witnessed the assassination of a president, the assassination of a civil rights leader, a conflict in Vietnam, and a counterculture revolution among the youth. The counterculture would peacefully protest and rally against the government early on, but as the decade progressed, the counterculture would split into various factions. Some of these splinter groups would carry out violent measures to make themselves, and there opinions, known. While the violent actions were carried out by a strict minority, they attracted much attention from the press. The pu ...
    Related: proposal, sixties, democratic society, graduate student, democracy
  • Sixties Counterculture: 10 Pg Proposal - 1,689 words
    ... nings of underground acid rock. Monterey along with Woodstock, which followed two years later, created a mythical society, as Abbie Hoffman would call it, a Woodstock nation. The Woodstock nation was a state of mind, an anarchy realizing itself in the act of anarchic rebellion. Shortly after Woodstock, Hoffmans dream was badly wounded if not destroyed by the Rolling Stones and the Hells Angels at Altamont. The Stones had hired the Hells Angels as security for the show, and from the start the vibes were bad. Gitlin recalls that the majority of the crowd was on acid and having bad trips. This along with the Angels fighting and shoving anyone who got to close to them or the stage caused a r ...
    Related: proposal, sixties, harcourt brace, university press, dorsey
  • The Sixties - 1,275 words
    The Sixties Why were the sixties a importance to our country's history? The sixties were an exciting, revolutionary, turbulent time of great social and technological change: assassination, unforgettable fashion, new musical styles, Camelot, civil rights, women's liberation, a controversial and decisive war in Vietnam, the anti-war protest to go along with the war, space exploration and the space race, peace marches, flower power, great TV and film and sexual freedom, and of course the great babyboomers. The sixties also showed Communism coming into the Western hemisphere and thus coming to the Cuban Missile Crisis. Movements towards the end to poverty, helping the environment, and the women' ...
    Related: sixties, national organization, jack ruby, space race, televised
  • The Sixties - 1,301 words
    ... ace. One of the most violent wars happened in the sixties. The United States lost more people in the Vietnam War than in any other war the United States ever participated in. Though the war started in the fifties, it did not hit home hard until the sixties. In 1961, the U.S. provided the first direct military support to South Vietnam, which included 36 army helicopters and air and ground crews, totaling nearly 400 men. The U.S. really got into the war when President Kennedy gave the signal on February 14, 1962 to return fire if fired upon. (Hooland 126). In 1965, the U.S. began to bomb North Vietnam because of an alleged attack on U.S. destroyers in the Gulf of Tonkin. In 1966, the war s ...
    Related: sixties, richard nixon, peace movement, york city, election
  • The Sixties - 1,316 words
    The Sixties The Sixties Many social changes that were addresses in the 1960s are still the issues being confronted today. The 60s was a decade of social and political upheaval. Inspite of all the turmoil, there were some positive results: the civil rights revolution, John F. Kennedys bold vision of a new frontier, and the breathtaking advances in space, helped bring about progress and prosperity. However, there was alot of negative effects: student and anti-war protest movements, political assassinations, and ghetto riots excited American people and resulted in lack of respect for authority and the law. The decade began under the shadow of the cold war with the Soviet Union, which was aggrav ...
    Related: sixties, space race, baby boomers, luther king, racism
  • The Sixties - 964 words
    The Sixties The Sixties split the skies. Only Civil and two world wars so neatly divided our history into a Before and After. And the Sixties were more divisive than World War II, which drew more people for the war effort. The Sixties drove people apart husbands from wives, children from parents, students from teachers, citizens from their government. Authority was strengthened by World War II. It was challenged by the sixties. Relatively few Americans in 1960 would have predicted that the decade ahead was to be among the most turbulent of the century. Despite the growing restiveness of the nations African American population, and despite undercurrents of protest and discontent from many ot ...
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  • 2001: A Space Odyssey - 1,255 words
    2001: A Space Odyssey The concept of space travel has been an interest to many since the beginning of time. Today, scientists are moving at a comfortable pace to expand our vast knowledge of the universe. Many authors dreamed of the possibilities while scientists tried to bring them to reality. The book "2001: A Space Odyssey," written by Arthur C. Clarke in the 1960's, proposed ideas about advanced space travel that took place in a time period only two years from now; however, at the current rate of the space program, mankind is nowhere near the technology showed by the book. Clarke uses concepts of space travel that can still only be dreamed of today. Clarke, an author of the sixties, had ...
    Related: odyssey, outer space, space odyssey, space program, space shuttle, space technology, space travel
  • 60s Music Influence On Our Society - 1,930 words
    60'S Music Influence On Our Society Sixties Music and How it Reflected the Changing Times Chris Montaigne Professor Shao Rhetoric II The 1960's in the United States was a decade marred by social unrest, civil rights injustice, and violence both home and abroad. These were some of the factors that lead to a cultural revolution. The revolution attempted to diverge the fabric of American society. Teenagers were living dangerously and breaking away from the ideals that their parents held. In the process they created their own society (Burns 1990). They were young and had the nerve to believe that they could change the world. Their leaders had lofty goals as well. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. had d ...
    Related: american society, folk music, music, popular music, rock music, woodstock music
  • 65279the Establishment In The 1960s - 1,012 words
    The Establishment in the 1960's The nineteen sixties were times of great change. Many people went from moderates to radicals because of the environment around them. That environment was called the establishment. It included all of the events going on in the nineteen sixties. Some of the main events taking place were the Vietnam War, the government, the Democratic National Convention and the culture (*). Many protested things that they did not believe in or thought was wrong (*). There were many things that made the radical's different from the moderates. They were the music they listened to and the clothes they wore. Most obviously was the way they acted. In the summer of 1967, society and r ...
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  • 65279the Establishment In The 1960s - 982 words
    ... more than 180,000 by the end of the year and to 500,000 by 1968. Johnson did not have the same views as some of the radicals. He wanted to keep the United States in the Vietnam War, while the radicals did not. Richard Nixon was the thirty-seventh president after Lyndon Johnson. Nixon didnt believe in the Vietnam War as highly as Johnson. In 1973, after four years of war in Vietnam, the administration managed to arrange a cease-fire that would last long enough to allow U.S. departure from Vietnam. Nixon had very different views then the radicals. He thought that all of the protestors were rebels who should have action taken against them. Even though he ordered the departure of all United ...
    Related: establishment, martin luther, north vietnam, john f kennedy, catholic
  • A Comparison Of Coleridge's Rationalism To Wordsworth's Liberalism - 1,720 words
    A Comparison Of Coleridge'S Rationalism To Wordsworth'S Liberalism All friendships grow and nurture each other through time. The friendship between Coleridge and Wordsworth allowed for a special relationship of both criticism and admiration to develop. As their friendship matured, they would play important roles in each other's works, culminating in their joint publication of Lyrical Ballads, which is said to mark the beginning of the Romantic period and be a combination of their best works. Despite their basic differences in poetic styles and philosophical beliefs, they would help each other create numerous works renown for their depth and creativity. Coleridge was a reserved dreamer, a tru ...
    Related: comparison, liberalism, rationalism, young boy, samuel taylor coleridge
  • Adrienne Rich - 1,719 words
    Adrienne Rich "What I know, I know through making poems" Passion, Politics and the Body in the Poetry of Adrienne Rich Liz Yorke, Nottingham Trent University, England This paper is largely extracted from my book Adrienne Rich, which is to be published by Sage in October this year...What I have tried to do for the paper is to track one thread explored by the book, which I feel runs through the whole span of Rich's thought, a thread which links desire, passion, and the body - to politics, to activism, and to the writing of poetry. Writing poetry, above all, involves a willingness to let the unconscious speak - a willingness to listen within for the whispers that tell of what we know, even thou ...
    Related: adrienne, adrienne rich, natural order, unconscious mind, feminism
  • Adult Illiteracy - 3,219 words
    ... atic, enemies of early, intensive teaching of phonics. Frank Smith and Kenneth Goodman are two of today's most influential proponents of the look and say or as they would term it, whole language philosophy of teaching reading. San Diego State University Professor Patrick Groff recently reviewed 43 reading texts, all published in the1980's and used by teachers' colleges in training reading teachers, to see if they included the findings of researchers that the code-emphasis or phonics approach to teaching reading should be used. He found that none of these books advocate phonics. In fact, only nine of these books inform teachers that there is current debate about if or when phonics should ...
    Related: adult, adult education, adult literacy, illiteracy, state university
  • Affirmative Action - 1,599 words
    Affirmative Action AFFIRMATIVE ACTION INTRODUCTION Affirmative action is the name of an American social practice through which members of historically disadvantaged racial and/or ethnic groups are given preferential treatment in an effort to compensate for past harm caused to their ancestors. For thirty years, affirmative action was carefully shielded from open, honest evaluation while it simultaneously grew more pervasive along with the federal bureaucracy and welfare state. The recent political upheaval caused by the Republican takeover of Congress in 1994 has opened the door for opponents of affirmative action programs to successfully pursue their gradual elimination. If affirmative actio ...
    Related: action program, affirmative, affirmative action, jossey bass, american people
  • Agatha Christie: Queen Of The Mystery Genre - 1,400 words
    Agatha Christie: Queen Of The Mystery Genre Agatha Christie: Queen of the Mystery Genre Agatha Mary Clarissa Miller was born to Mr. and Mrs. Fred Miller of Torquay, Devon, England. Researchers debate on the year in which she was born, but it was September 15 in either 1890 or 1891. Her father was an American who lived with his British wife in Torquay. At the time, her parents did not realize that their daughter would one day become a famous English author, writing an insatiable amount of novels and plays. Her focus was mainly on the mystery genre of literature. She was married two times, and bore one daughter by her first husband. In 1971, five years before her death, Christie was given the ...
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  • Allegory Of American Pie By Don Mclean - 1,175 words
    ... he music. The Byrds sang a song called Eight Miles High, but they were falling fast and landed foul on the "grass", marijuana (Jordan), which was also the sweet perfume (Kulawiec). During the mid-60s the Beatles predominantly influenced rock music the most. Dylan is the "jester on the sidelines in a cast," the sidelines being the outside of the rock music scene and the cast being from a motorcycle accident he claimed to have which was keeping him out of the scene, which some say never happened (Jordan). The half time air was probably referring to the heavy drug use of the mid- 60s (half-time). The sergeants are either the Beatles Sgt. Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band or the Army playing m ...
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  • Allegory Of American Pie By Don Mclean - 1,202 words
    Allegory of American Pie by Don McLean A Piece of the "Pie" Ask anyone what was the defining moment in the rock history of the 1960s was and all you will get is a one word answer: Woodstock. The three day rock festival that defined an era was only one of many music festivals of the 60s. But Woodstock has come to symbolize, "an era of peaceful, free- loving, drug- taking hippie youth, carefree before harsher realities hit..." (Layman 40). The Woodstock festival ended a century filled with many metamorphoses of rocknroll, from the era of pop music to the rebirth of folk music to the invention of acid rock. But some cynics say that rocknroll died with the death of Buddy Holly before the 60s eve ...
    Related: allegory, american, american art, folk music, the courtroom
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