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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: singapore

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  • Media Singapore - 1,490 words
    Media Singapore Singapore. Even saying the word and some of the uninformed may still hold the belief that it is located somewhere in China, knowing only where it is approximately. Yet this vibrant, newly industrialized city-state is in fact located close to the equator and is often overlooked on the world map; not surprising, considering it is only represented by a small dot in the South China Sea. Today, the island of Singapore has earned high acclaim for its rapid transformation from a humble trading post to the modern, technological metropolis that it has proudly become. Singapore has been described by some economists as a modest miracle, simply because it has managed to achieve the statu ...
    Related: media, singapore, early years, british colony, india
  • Recent Singapore History - 1,219 words
    Recent Singapore History Singapore, since it attained its independence on June 3, 1959, has been a thriving, trading nation. It had been controlled by the British, but after negotiations, was relinquished to self-autonomy with the understanding that it would remain a republic. Since then, it has reaffirmed its non-Communist stance and continued with progressive economic policies to the delight of the free world. Singapores modern history begins with its independence. It quickly drafted a Constitution, which called for a nine-member cabinet, drawn from the 51-member legislature, and a Prime Minister. An additional stipulation was that there had to be a Malay Head of State in the predominately ...
    Related: history, modern history, singapore, prime minister, world trade
  • Singapore Media - 1,489 words
    Singapore Media Even saying the word and some of the uninformed may still hold the belief that it is located "somewhere in China," knowing only where it is approximately. Yet this vibrant, newly industrialized city-state is in fact located close to the equator and is often overlooked on the world map; not surprising, considering it is only represented by a small dot in the South China Sea. Today, the island of Singapore has earned high acclaim for its rapid transformation from a humble trading post to the modern, technological metropolis that it has proudly become. Singapore has been described by some economists as a "modest miracle," simply because it has managed to achieve the status of an ...
    Related: media, singapore, asian culture, india company, fiber
  • Singapore Media - 1,485 words
    ... abor-intensive products toward higher technological content and worker-skilled products. Potential investors were encouraged to look elsewhere for low-wage, unskilled labor. Aside from producing high value-added exports, the computer and electronics industries played a critical role in the increase of manpower productivity in other technology-intensive industries. The National Computer Board was formed in 1981 to establish Singapore as an international center for computer services; this was mainly to reduce the shortage of skilled computer professionals and to assure high standards of international caliber. (Sim, 1986) By the mid-1980s, the small but growing printing and publishing indus ...
    Related: media, media communication, media relations, new media, singapore
  • The Ecommerce Environment Of Singapore - 1,466 words
    The E-Commerce Environment Of Singapore Geography The Republic of Singapore is located in southeast Asia, south of Malaysia and northwest of Indonesia. The island measures a total of 637 square kilometers with a coastline 193 kilometers long. Singapore is generally comprised of lowland areas with a central plateau in the middle of the island. Its elevation ranges from the Bukit Timah, (166 m.), to the Singapore Strait which is at sea level. Its climate is tropical and wet. Precipitation occurs on 40% of all days, (70% of days in April). Singapore's two biggest natural recourses are its fishing industry, and its deep water ports. Singapore is also a focal point for most Southeast Asian sea ro ...
    Related: business environment, ecommerce, singapore, pacific rim, economic conditions
  • A Hurried Businessman Runs Across The Airport At A Full Sprint If He Doesnt Get To Gate D3 In Three Minutes, He Will Miss His - 1,211 words
    A hurried businessman runs across the airport at a full sprint. If he doesn't get to Gate D3 in three minutes, he will miss his flight to Singapore. As he is running, little beads of sweat begin to form on his brow. People gawk at him and hurl insults his way when he bumps past them with seemingly no thought. All of a sudden, the man stops in full stride, whining to a stop. He breathes heavily and looks to his right. How can he go on the plane without something to read? Quickly the man bounds over to the news stand and looks at the plethora of reading materials. News looks appealing. Grabbing a local newspaper and a copy of Newsweek, the man tries to decide which one to buy. The dullness of ...
    Related: airport, businessman, gate, runs, sprint
  • Asia - 1,713 words
    Asia Asia Asia, largest of the earth's seven continents. With outlying islands, it covers an estimated 44,936,000 sq km (17,350,000 sq mi), or about one-third of the world's total land area. Asia has more than 3.2 billion inhabitants. Its peoples account for three-fifths of the world's population. Lying almost entirely in the northern hemisphere, Asia is bounded by the Arctic, Pacific, and Indian oceans. The conventional boundary between Europe and Asia is drawn at the Ural Mountains in Russia. Asia and Africa are separated by the Red Sea. Asia is divided for convenience into five major realms: the areas of the former Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR); East Asia, including China, Mo ...
    Related: asia, central asia, east asia, eastern asia, south asia, southeast asia, southwest asia
  • Asia - 290 words
    Asia Asia Asia is the largest of all the continents and includes within its limits an area of 17,159,995 sq mi, or about 33% of the world's total land surface and the greater part of the Eurasian land mass. The border between Europe is traditionally drawn as an imaginary zigzag line passing down the spine of the Ural Mountains and through the Caspian Sea, Caucasus Mountains, and Black Sea. The boundary dividing Asia and Africa is generally placed along the Suez Canal, and the boundary between Asia and Australasia is usually placed between the island of New Guinea and Australia. Asia is by far the most populous of all the continents, with an estimated population in 1992 of 3,275,200,000, or m ...
    Related: asia, east asia, south asia, southeast asia, southwest asia
  • Asian Affirmation And Islamic Resurgence - 1,053 words
    Asian Affirmation And Islamic Resurgence Two civilizations that were challenging the theory of Western supremacy and stressing the importance of their own culture in relation to that of the West were the Asian and Islamic civilizations. Both the Asian culture and the Islamic religion entered a great stage of revival and expansion which led to an increase in their self-confidence. Asian self-confidence was the result of rapid economic growth and development while Islamic superiority resulted from its population growth. Asian Affirmation dealt with the economic development of East Asia. It helped prove the wrong the idea that Asia lacked the incentive and the means to successfully become econo ...
    Related: affirmation, asian, asian culture, asian development, islamic, islamic law, islamic religion
  • Asian Crisis - 1,925 words
    Asian Crisis Introduction A financial crisis swept like a bush fire through the tiger economies of South East Asia between June 1997 and January 1998. One country after another, local stocks markets and currency imploded. When the dust started to settle, the stock markets in many of these countries had lost over 70% of their value. Leaders of some these nations had to approach the International Monetary Fund (IMF) to beg for massive financial assistance. The crisis in Asia has occurred after several decades of outstanding economic performance and growth. Annual Gross Domestic Product (GDP) growth in the ASEAN- 5 (Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia and Philippines) averaged closed to 8% ...
    Related: asian, asian countries, asian crisis, crisis, east asian, economic crisis, financial crisis
  • Asian Crisis - 291 words
    Asian Crisis The continuing Asian economic crisis that began in mid-1997 ranks as Asia's second biggest event since World War II. The crisis suddenly halted the region's unprecedented three decades of rapid economic growth. Within Asia itself, the crisis has had not only serious domestic social, political, and economic impact, it has affected intra- and extraregional international relations, as well as intellectual and policy discourse. At the same time, the crisis has almost incompatibly, spawned the deepest uncertainty yet among Asian government and business leaders and the public at large about the wisdom of following the universalistic (but really Western, especially American-propagated) ...
    Related: asian, asian crisis, crisis, economic crisis, hong kong
  • Asian Crisis - 1,978 words
    Asian Crisis On the 2nd of July 1997, Asia was hit by one of the most devastating financial crises it has ever seen. Of all the financial crisis that have taken place, this was one of the most distressing in that it was totally unexpected. The purpose of this paper is to show that particular developmental strategies employed by these economies eventually led to their downfall. It will attempt to find out where the origins of the crisis lie, and what events started the cycle that eventuated with this disaster. In order to trace the events that led to the eventual collapse of the Asian economies, one must venture across the ocean to the United States. The issue of liberalisation first gained a ...
    Related: asian, asian countries, asian crisis, crisis, east asian, financial crisis, southeast asian
  • Asian Crisis - 1,034 words
    Asian Crisis There are many speculations about the causes of the Asian Crisis. From my research I found out that there is quite a number of reasons for the Asian currency crisis. There is a book called; The East Asian Miracle, which was published by the World Bank. This book expressed the relationship between government, the private sector, and the market. (See Hoover Digest 1998 No.3. William McGurn. What went wrong?) The book talks about the economic bloom in Southeast Asia. The East Asian countries borrowed a lot of money from the IMF and World Bank and used it to create a better economy for themselves. I found out that the following countries due to their reoccurrence during my research ...
    Related: asian, asian countries, asian crisis, asian values, crisis, east asian
  • Asian Crisis - 1,338 words
    Asian Crisis A large economic downturn in East Asia threatens to end its nearly 30 year run of high growth rates. It is hard to understand what these declines will actualy do to the world market. The crisis has caused Asian currencies to fall 50-60%, stock markets to decline 40%, banks to close, and property values to drop. The crisis was brought on by currency devaluations, bad banking practices, high foreign debt, loose government regulation, and corruption. Due to East Asia's large impact on the world economy, the panic in Thailand, Indonesia, Korea, and other Asian countries has prompted other countries to worry about the affect on their own economies and offer aid to the financially tro ...
    Related: asian, asian countries, asian crisis, asian nations, crisis, east asian, economic crisis
  • Asian Financial Crisis - 1,304 words
    Asian Financial Crisis Introduction Many economists have said that the growth experienced by Southeastern Asian countries during the 1980s and early 1990s was a miracle. Japan, Malaysia, South Korea, Indonesia and other countries in the region experienced annual growth rates of over 7 percent. Along with this rapid growth, these countries also saw very little unemployment and an almost invisible wealth gap between the different social and economic classes of citizens. Circumstances have dramatically changed, however. In the summer of 1997, Southeast Asia experienced a time of great financial and economic turmoil. At first, the economic crisis was isolated in Thailand's financial sector, but ...
    Related: asian, asian countries, asian financial, asian financial crisis, crisis, economic crisis, financial crisis
  • Australia And Apec - 1,202 words
    Australia And Apec Economics assignment: APEC When the Asian-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) was established in 1989 in response to the growing interdependence among Asia-Pacific economies, its goal was to advance Asia-Pacific economic dynamism and sense of community. When the cooperation was established, there were 12 founding member economies, namely Australia, Brunei Darussalam, Canada, Indonesia, Japan, Republic of Korea, Malaysia, New Zealand, Republic of the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and the United States. Since then there has been more countries/economies joining APEC. APEC has come a long way since 1989. It has built steadily on the efforts of the past and looks forward to ...
    Related: apec, australia, national product, economic growth, taipei
  • Birth Of Communication - 2,382 words
    Birth Of Communication Outline I. It is important to reflect one's own national and cultural identity to understand what is different among people of different nations. History teaches us that culture always changes because of internal or external influences, even our own cultures and values change over time. Our world today is a world in which people from different nations and cultures are getting closer and closer because of economical and political reasons. Because cultures are becoming closer, communication is the most important quality for anyone to work on if they want to work in the international society. The history of communication and the relationships that were formed in the early ...
    Related: communication technology, cross-cultural communication, cultural communication, intercultural communication, international communication
  • Bp Amoco - 1,316 words
    BP Amoco BP Amoco British Petrochemical Corporation registered on April 14, 1909, as the Anglo-Persian Oil Company, Ltd. It was named the Anglo-Iranian Oil Company, Ltd., in 1935 and changed its name to the British Petroleum Company Limited in 1954. The current name was adopted in 1982. The companys headquarters are in London. The Anglo-Persian Oil Company was formed in 1909 to take over and finance an oil-field concession granted in 1901 by the Iranian government to an English investor, William Knox DArcy. (Britannica) In 1914 the British government became the companys principal stockholder and over the years was usually the largest single stockholder. Effective January 1, 1955, British Pet ...
    Related: amoco, trade commission, british government, middle east, network
  • Bp Amoco - 1,242 words
    ... ve our performance by building on the track record and the highest achievements of each company. BP Amoco will aspire to deliver excellent performance in every part of our business and to be in touch with the reality of the world in which they are operating. They want to build relationships on the basis of mutual advantage the needs of those who do business with them, and the needs of each community in which they operate. They aim to conduct their operations without accidents, no harm to people and no damage to the environment. They apply their skills, technology, and know-how to the search for creative and constructive solutions. Their business policies are universal. Their commitment ...
    Related: amoco, operating profit, solar power, natural environment, studying
  • Canadian National Unity - 1,756 words
    ... esses that so much redundancy exists in administration and so much money is spent on bilingualization and transferred needlessly from rich province to poor province in an effort to keep Quebec inside the confederation that after separation both Quebec and English-speaking Canada would be better off, financially and otherwise. Without addressing this contention, the same assumption occurs here: after Quebec leaves, Canada remains united. The assumption that Quebec voters would not accept the economic costs and risks of separation and were not subject to romantic sentiment on this issue proved wrong. Until a week before the referendum, virtually no one predicted the closeness of the vote. ...
    Related: canadian, canadian economy, national history, national policy, unity
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