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  • After Beethoven, Composers Turned Their Attention To The Expression Of Intense Feelings In Their Music This Expression Of Emo - 530 words
    After Beethoven, composers turned their attention to the expression of intense feelings in their music. This expression of emotion was the focus of all the arts of the "Romantic" movement. For inspiration, many Romantic composers turned to the visual arts, to poetry, drama and literature, and to nature itself. Using the classical forms of Sonata and Symphony as a starting point, composers began focusing more on new melodic styles, richer harmonies, and ever more dissonance, in the pursuit of moving their audiences, rather than concerning themselves with the structural discipline of Classical forms. Later composers of the nineteenth century would further build on the forms and ideas developed ...
    Related: intense, music, nineteenth century, romantic period, composer
  • Beethoven - 753 words
    Beethoven BEETHOVEN, Ludwig van (1770-1827) The composer of some of the most influential pieces of music ever written, Ludwig van Beethoven created a bridge between the 18th-century classical period and the new beginnings of Romanticism. His greatest breakthroughs in composition came in his instrumental work, including his symphonies. Unlike his predecessor Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, for whom writing music seemed to come easily, Beethoven always struggled to perfect his work. Ludwig van Beethoven was born in Bonn, Germany, and was baptized on Dec. 17, 1770. (There is no record of his birth date.) His father and grandfather worked as court musicians in Bonn. Ludwig's father, a singer, gave him ...
    Related: beethoven, ludwig van beethoven, joseph haydn, antonio salieri, scherzo
  • Beethoven - 652 words
    Beethoven Ludwig van Beethoven was, and remains today, a Legend in the history of classical music. His influence on music is unequalled. Perhaps no other composer in history wrote music of such exhilarating power. No other composer did so against the trials and hardships that he had went through. He beat the odds to become who he was. A Beethoven was born in Bonn in 1770. His father, a music enthusiast, dreamed of molding his son into the next Mozart. Beethoven never showed the same characteristics that Mozart had shown when he was young, but was unusually talented, learning the piano, organ and violin at an early age. At 14, he was already proficient enough on the organ to receive a profess ...
    Related: beethoven, ludwig van beethoven, classical music, teaching methods, frustrated
  • Beethoven - 1,053 words
    Beethoven Beethoven Ludwig van Beethoven overcame many obstacles throughout his life (1770-1827). By expanding the style of his influences, he accomplished musical tasks before possible. His influences were Neefe, Mozart, and Bach. In comparison to other composers, such as Bach and Mozart, Beethoven produced a relatively small number of symphonies. However, his nine symphonies contained more emotion and ingenuity than all other artists combined. In fact, the Ninth Symphony Orchestra is Beethovens most renowned work, as well as the greatest accomplishment in music history. Beethoven possessed an enormous musical mind, and proved himself to be the most influential composer of all time. Beethov ...
    Related: beethoven, ludwig van beethoven, dysfunctional family, music history, composing
  • Beethoven - 1,553 words
    Beethoven There resounds a proverbial question, If a tree falls in the woods and no one is there to hear, does it make a sound as it falls? Capricious as this query may appear I have had occasion to entertain just such a notion when, as a youth, I found an exploratory journey down a deep woods path abruptly halted by the greeting of an enormous fallen tree. The colossal obstacle lay across my path and presented itself a motionless, silent guardian that protected that which lay beyond from my further intrusion. What a monumental disturbance must have been witnessed by the forest as this giant came crashing down! I wondered how the tree came to be there in the first place or what of the countl ...
    Related: beethoven, ludwig van beethoven, last time, lasting effects, harmony
  • Beethoven - 479 words
    Beethoven Ludwig van Beethoven was a German composer who is considered to be one of the greatest musicians of all time. He was born in Bonn. Beethovens fathers harsh discipline and alcoholism made his childhood and adolescence difficult. After his mothers death, at the age of 18, he placed himself at the head of the family, taking responsibility for his two younger brothers, both of whom followed him when he later moved to Vienna, Austria. In Bonn, Beethovens most important composition teacher was German composer Christian Gottlob Neefe, with whom he studied during the 1780s. Neefe mostly used the music of German composer Johann Sebastian Bach in his instruction. He later encouraged his stud ...
    Related: beethoven, ludwig van beethoven, amadeus mozart, classical music, humor
  • Beethoven, Berloiz, And Chopin - 1,384 words
    Beethoven, Berloiz, And Chopin Beethoven, Berlioz and Chopin Beethoven Beethoven was born in Bonn, Germany in 1770 to Johann van Beethoven and his wife, Maria Magdalena. He took his first music lessons from his father, who was tenor in the choir of the archbishop-elector of Cologne. His father was an unstable, yet ambitious man whose excessive drinking, rough temper and anxiety surprisingly did not diminish Beethoven's love for music. He studied and performed with great success, despite becoming the breadwinner of his household by the time he was 18 years old. His father's increasingly serious alcohol problem and the earlier death of his grandfather in 1773 sent his family into deepening pov ...
    Related: chopin, hector berlioz, good friends, medical school, bonn
  • Beethoven, Berloiz, And Chopin - 1,380 words
    ... she was in financial hardship so she decided to meet Berlioz. She saw him as a way out of debt, so on October 3, 1833, they were married. In December, he gave a performance of King Lear, after which Paganini gave him great praise, and they developed a friendship. Berlioz wrote a piece for him and turned it into Harold in Italy. In 1834, they had a son, Louis. Harriet's acting career failed, and her beauty and health were fading fast. She soon began drinking and was turning into a shrew. Berlioz could not deal with her anymore, and moved out and took a mistress named Marie Recio, and opera singer. The next few years after that, he traveled a lot with success in Germany, Russia and London ...
    Related: chopin, yellow fever, george sand, early years, rondo
  • Ludwig Van Beethoven - 959 words
    Ludwig Van Beethoven Beethoven For many people, Ludwig Van Beethoven is considered the greatest composer who ever lived and is the highest level of musical geniuses. His compositions are the expression of one of the most powerful musical personalities of all time which he exceeded above average in both areas of Classical and Romantic labeling. Beethoven was born in Bonn, Germany, December 16, 1770, and was baptized on December 17. His father, Johann, was a singer employed by the Elector of Cologne in Bonn. Johann married Maria Magdalena Laym, a cook's daughter. Together they had seven children of which three sons survived, Beethoven was the oldest (Collier's Encyclopedia, Beethoven). When Jo ...
    Related: beethoven, ludwig, ludwig van beethoven, piano concerto, attempted suicide
  • Ludwig Van Beethoven - 568 words
    Ludwig Van Beethoven BEETHOVEN 1770-1827 Life of Beethoven I. Education in general and in music Beethoven came from a musical family, and his early musical training was under his father's guidance. His father taught him piano and violin. His general education was not continued beyond the elementary school. He was practically illiterate in math. II. Self assertion As a youth of 19, in 1789, Beethoven took legal steps to have himself placed at the head of his family. He petitioned for half his father's salary to support his brothers. This act of self-assertion is an indication of his character. III. Studies with Haydn A. The first contact On one of Haydn's trips to London, he met the young Bee ...
    Related: beethoven, ludwig, ludwig van beethoven, general education, elementary school
  • Ludwig Van Beethoven Was Born In Bonn, Germany He Studied In Vienna Under Mozart And Hayden In Vienna He First Made His Reput - 322 words
    Ludwig van Beethoven was born in Bonn, Germany. He studied in Vienna under Mozart and Hayden. In Vienna he first made his reputation as a pianist and teacher, and he became famous quickly. At this time he composed many of his most popular works such as the Fifth symphony, the Emperor Concerto, the Eroica and Pastoral symphonies, and his only opera Fidelio. Beethoven developed a completely original style of music, reflecting his sufferings and joys. His work forms a peak in the development of tonal music and is one of the most important developments in the history of music. Before his time, composers wrote works for religious services, and to entertain people. But people listened to Beethoven ...
    Related: beethoven, germany, hayden, ludwig, ludwig van beethoven, mozart, vienna
  • Ludwig Von Beethoven - 557 words
    Ludwig von Beethoven One of the greatest musical geniuses of all time didnt even know his own birthday. Ludwig von Beethoven was born second in his family, behind Ludwig Maria, his older brother, who died very young. This loss may still have stung their parents. Their pain could have overshadowed the second Ludwigs own early childhood. The brothers shared a name, Ludwig, which probably added to his confusion. A common mistake is the claim that Beethoven was born on December 17, 1770. This is actually the date of his baptism, which suggests that he may have been born on December 16, but the details are unknown. Although his birthday is unknown, we do know that he was born in Bonn, Germany. Mi ...
    Related: beethoven, ludwig, romantic period, hearing loss, dignity
  • The Rise Of Ludwig Van Beethoven Into The Ranks Of Historys Greatest Composers Was Parallelled By And In Some Ways A Conseque - 1,456 words
    The rise of Ludwig van Beethoven into the ranks of history's greatest composers was parallelled by and in some ways a consequence of his own personal tragedy and despair. Beginning in the late 1790's, the increasing buzzing and humming in his ears sent Beethoven into a panic, searching for a cure from doctor to doctor. By October 1802 he had written the Heiligenstadt Testament confessing the certainty of his growing deafness, his consequent despair, and suicidal considerations. Yet, despite the personal tragedy caused by the "infirmity in the one sense which ought to be more perfect in [him] than in others, a sense which [he] once possessed in the highest perfection, a perfection such as few ...
    Related: beethoven, ludwig, ludwig van beethoven, music history, string quartet
  • A Room With A View By Ed Forster - 617 words
    A Room with a View by E.D. Forster Opening a Window A Room with a View by E.D. Forster explores the struggle between the expectations of a conventional lady of the British upper class and pursuing the heart. Miss Lucy Honeychurch must choose between class concerns and personal desires. Honeychurch is a respectable young lady from a well-known family. She travels with Miss Charlotte Bartlett to Italy at the turn of the century. In Italy they meet Mr. Emerson and George Emerson. George is young man who falls in love with Lucy. Mr. Emerson is an idealist and a dreamer. Only a couple of days after they get to Italy George kisses Lucy while standing in the middle of a waving field of grass. Georg ...
    Related: forster, love story, upper class, passionate, beethoven
  • Amadeus By Peter Shaffer - 1,278 words
    Amadeus By Peter Shaffer The play "Amadeus" by Peter Shaffer was not written in order to be a biography of the great composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, much more than this, Peter Shaffer wrote it as a story, rather than a history. In his story he was free to insert fiction to make the play more interesting to a wide audience, as well as to fulfill his purposes. However, musicologists and historians have written several articles claiming that Peter Shaffer "trashed this immortal". What none of them can see is that in "Amadeus" there are situations that are plausible while others are "fictional ornament". In this paper I will make an attempt to point what is fiction or untruth. The center of th ...
    Related: amadeus, amadeus mozart, peter, shaffer, wolfgang amadeus, wolfgang amadeus mozart
  • Analysis Of Haydns Emperor And Mozarts Requiem - 1,268 words
    Analysis of Haydn's Emperor and Mozart's Requiem On February 8, 2000 I attended a concert presented by the Festival Chamber Music Society. The performers were a string quartet and a French horn. Eriko Sato is a violinist who has won the Tibor Varga International competition and has appeared as a soloist with the Louisville and Tokyo Imperial orchestras. Laurie Smukler is also a violinist. She is a graduate of Juliard where she studied with Ivan Galamian. She was also a founding member of the Mendelssohn String Quartet. Ruth Sommers was the director and the cellist. She too is graduate of Julliard and studied with Leonard Rose and Harvey Shapiro. Steven Taylor play the oboe. He is a member of ...
    Related: amadeus mozart, emperor, joseph haydn, requiem, wolfgang amadeus mozart
  • April Robinson - 1,165 words
    ... uncil. On a few occasions Bach left to visit his son in Potsdam. Upon returning he would find the council quite upset with him, but would refuse to explain himself. He almost quit, but a close friend persuaded him not to. Bach got into some trouble while he was at Leipzig. He went on many out of town trips and left one of his students in charge each time. When the school board got upset and asked him about it he refused to justify himself. He would have been thrown out except for the help of a friend who had ties and had some strings pulled to keep Bach employed. After this friend left Bach quit. Bach composed many of his pieces for the specific groups that were to perform them. Thus he ...
    Related: robinson, oxford university, sebastian bach, university press, chorale
  • Autism - 4,335 words
    ... We start with an imagea tiny, golden child on hands and knees, circling round and round a spot on the floor in mysterious, self-absorbed delight. She does not look up, though she is smiling and laughing; she does not call our attention to the mysterious object of her pleasure. She does not see us at all. She and the spot are all there is, and though she is eighteen months old, an age for touching, tasting, pointing, pushing, exploring, she is doing none of these. She does not walk, or crawl up stairs, or pull herself to her feet to reach for objects. She doesnt want any objects. Instead, she circles her spot. Or she sits, a long chain in her hand, snaking it up and down, up and down, wat ...
    Related: autism, genetic basis, mentally retarded, mental retardation, spectrum
  • Beatlemania In The 1960s - 1,627 words
    Beatlemania in the 1960s The Beatles were a mystical happening that many people still don't understand. Phenomenoligists had a ball in 1964 with Beatlemania, a generally harmless form of madness which came from Britain in 1963. The sole cause of Beatlemania is a quartet of young Englishmen known as the Beatles. In the less than one year that they achieved popularity in England to the time they came to America, The Beatles achieved a popularity and following that is unprecedented in the history of show business in England. They became the first recording artists anywhere in the world to have a record become a million-seller before it's release. They became the target of such adoration by thei ...
    Related: the girl, middle class, medical ethics, seller, invasion
  • Beatlemania In The 1960s - 1,628 words
    Beatlemania in the 1960s The Beatles were a mystical happening that many people still don't underezd. Phenomenoligists had a ball in 1964 with Beatlemania, a generally harmless form of madness which came from Britain in 1963. The sole cause of Beatlemania is a quartet of young Englishmen known as the Beatles. In the less than one year that they achieved popularity in England to the time they came to America, The Beatles achieved a popularity and following that is unprecedented in the history of show business in England. They became the first recording artists anywhere in the world to have a record become a million-seller before it's release. They became the target of such adoration by their ...
    Related: popular culture, rockefeller center, the girl, editorial, beethoven
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