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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: shirley

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  • Lottery By Shirley Jackson - 512 words
    Lottery By Shirley Jackson Gothic is defined as "a style of fiction that emphasizes the grotesque and the mysterious." Similar to the works of Edgar Allan Poe, many of Shirley Jacksons stories are considered "gothic" fiction. One such story is "The Lottery" which was first published in 1948. This story focuses on a very grim day in the life of one of its citizens. It is a day in which one of its citizens will undergo a cruel and torturous death. The unfortunate citizen will die at the hands of his or her fellow citizens. In this short story, Shirley Jackson creates a gothic environment by emphasizing the grotesque and the mysterious; however, Jackson also makes the story seem realistic and b ...
    Related: jackson, lottery, shirley, shirley jackson, the lottery
  • Lottery By Shirley Jackson - 798 words
    Lottery By Shirley Jackson In many stories, settings are constructed to help build the mood and to foreshadow of things to come. "The Lottery" by Shirley Jackson is a story in which the setting sets up the reader to think of positive outcomes. However, this description of the setting foreshadows exactly the opposite of what is to come. In addition, the theme that we learn of at the end leads us to think of where the sanity of some human beings lies. The story begins with the establishment of the setting. To begin, Shirley Jackson tells the reader what time of day and what time of year the story takes place. This is important to get the reader to focus on what a typical day it is in this smal ...
    Related: jackson, lottery, shirley, shirley jackson, the lottery
  • Lottery By Shirley Jackson - 571 words
    Lottery By Shirley Jackson While the setting of Shirley Jacksons, The Lottery, takes place on a clear, sunny, June day, it does not take long for the skies to turn gray as she introduces the readers to the black box. The black box is the central symbol of the short story. It suggest both death and necessity of change due to a combination of the passage of time and population expansion. The reference to the black box as a symbol of death can be seen in many instances throughout the story. For example, when the box is first introduced, "the villagers kept their distance, leaving a space between themselves and the stool ( which the box was placed on)." People are afraid and the distance they ke ...
    Related: jackson, lottery, shirley, shirley jackson, the lottery
  • Lottery By Shirley Jackson - 926 words
    Lottery By Shirley Jackson Shirley Jackson's "The Lottery" portrays a small town in which the citizens gather for a yearly lottery. Unlike the "typical" lottery, this is not one you would want to win. Throughout "The Lottery," Jackson focuses on families from the village in order to demonstrate the role of separation of genders. Gender is defined as the sexual identity of a person, especially in relation to society or culture. Gender divisions exist within the community in "The Lottery" and issues of gender help to explain the characters action and thoughts. During the lottery, everyone is equal and the society is genderless. Although the men draw as the head of the household, the women part ...
    Related: jackson, lottery, shirley, shirley jackson, the lottery
  • Shirley Chisholm - 524 words
    Shirley Chisholm Hill Chisholm was born on November 30, 1924 in Brooklyn, New York. Her Father, Charles St. Hill was an immigrant from French Guyana (now it is called Guyana) and her mother, Ruby (Seale) was an immigrant from Barbados. Charles was a factory worker and her mother was a seamstress and a mother to help provide for the family. Young couples had a hard time making ends meet, and in hope of saving some of their money, they sent their children back to the Caribbean. Shirley at 3 years old and her 2 younger sisters, Muriel and Odessa went to live with their grandmother in Barbados, where they stayed for 7 years. When Shirley returned to the U.S she was put into a class two years ahe ...
    Related: chisholm, shirley, elementary education, unemployment insurance, landslide
  • Shirley Jacksons Emotion Laden Short Story The Lottery, Written In The Wake Of The Holocaust, Is A Grim Tale That Vividly Hig - 687 words
    Shirley Jackson's emotion laden short story "The Lottery," written in the wake of the Holocaust, is a grim tale that vividly highlights the latent dangers of social conformity. The story was initially published in 1948, a period marked by fear and moral uncertainty; only three years earlier, in the Nuremberg Trials, German soldiers claimed legal and moral innocence to charges of atrocious, hated-induced crimes, including mass genocide, against thousands of Jews in Western Europe. The soldiers defended their actions and disclaimed moral responsibility by testifying that they were "just following orders." In this historical context, "The Lottery" was intended as a stern warning to all people t ...
    Related: emotion, laden, shirley, shirley jackson, short story, tale, wake
  • Shirley Jacksons The Lottery - 540 words
    Shirley JacksonS The Lottery Shirley Jacksons, The Lottery, has raised questions in the back of every readers mind towards the destructive yet blind rituals of mankind. A reflection of ourselves is what we see when looking through the pond of Jacksons mind. The Lottery clearly expressed Jacksons feelings concerning traditional rituals through her story, opened the eyes of its readers to properly classify and question some of todays traditions as cruel, and allowed room to foretell the outcome of these unusual traditions. Jacksons feelings towards the misuse of tradition as an excuse to cause harm have triggered her creativity for the creation of The Lottery. Jackson obviously saw examples of ...
    Related: lottery, shirley, the lottery, point of view, best friend
  • Shirley Jacksons The Lottery - 906 words
    Shirley JacksonS The Lottery Shirley Jacksons The Lottery, raises many questions in the back of a readers mind towards the destructive yet blind rituals of mankind. The Lottery clearly expresses Jacksons feelings concerning mankinds evil nature hiding behind traditions and rituals. She shows how coldness and lack of compassion in people can exhibit in situations regarding tradition and values. Jackson presents the theme of the short story with the use of symbols and setting. The setting of The Lottery supports the theme. Settings are constructed to help build the mood and foreshadow things to come. In the lottery though, the setting foreshadows exactly the opposite of what is to come. The st ...
    Related: lottery, shirley, the lottery, american literature, tessie hutchinson
  • Subtlety Plays A Most Significant Role In The Setting Of The Lottery The Setting Set Forth By Shirley Jackson In The Beginnin - 736 words
    Subtlety plays a most significant role in the setting of "The Lottery." The setting set forth by Shirley Jackson in the beginning of the short story creates a mood of peacefulness and tranquillity. It also creates a visual image in the mind of the reader, the image of a typical town on a normal summer day. Shirley Jackson effectively uses setting in "The Lottery" to foreshadow an ironic ending. This is developed through a description of the physical setting, a general description of the residents, subtle hints throughout the story and the names of the main characters. These concepts all give the reader a better understanding of the setting and therefore a more enjoyable read. Shirley Jackson ...
    Related: jackson, lottery, shirley, shirley jackson, the lottery
  • The Lottery By Shirley Jackson - 798 words
    The Lottery by Shirley Jackson In many stories, settings are constructed to help build the mood and to foreshadow of things to come. "The Lottery" by Shirley Jackson is a story in which the setting sets up the reader to think of positive outcomes. However, this description of the setting foreshadows exactly the opposite of what is to come. In addition, the theme that we learn of at the end leads us to think of where the sanity of some human beings lies. The story begins with the establishment of the setting. To begin, Shirley Jackson tells the reader what time of day and what time of year the story takes place. This is important to get the reader to focus on what a typical day it is in this ...
    Related: jackson, lottery, shirley, shirley jackson, the lottery
  • The Lottery By Shirley Jackson - 1,042 words
    The Lottery" By Shirley Jackson Analyzation encompasses the application of given criteria to a literary work to determine how efficiently that work employs the given criteria. In the analyzation of short stories, the reader uses a brief imaginative narrative unfolding a single incident and a chief character by means of a plot, the details so compresses and the whole treatment so organized, a single impression results. To expose that impression, the reader explores the workings of seven basic criteria. On particular criterion effectively supports the central idea on "The Lottery" by Shirley Jackson. The author teaches the central idea through the actions of the protagonist in the plot through ...
    Related: jackson, lottery, shirley, shirley jackson, the lottery
  • 1954 - 1,704 words
    1954 In the year 1954, the United States was changing rapidly. President Eisenhower, a Republican, was in the midst of his first term. Eisenhower had just announced to the world that the United States had in fact developed and successfully tested the first hydrogen bomb some two years prior. Mamie Eisenhower christened the Nautilus, which was the first submarine to run on nuclear power. The great court decision, Brown vs. the Board of Education, called for the integration of the countrys public schools. Arkansas and Alabama refused to integrate and President Eisenhower was forced to send the 101st Airborne Division to integrate the schools of these states. The phrase Under God was added to t ...
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  • 1968 Life - 1,242 words
    1968 Life Analysis of Life for 1968 The year 1968 was a time of war, civil rights movements, and riots. Many big events took place during 1968. Many lives were changed by these events. Out if the 1960s, 1968 stands out the most. In January of 1968 the United States thought that the Vietnam War was coming to a close, but President Johnson made a statement that changed the direction of Vietnam. President Johnson said the South Vietnamese could not win. This caused the South Vietnamese could not win. This caused the South Vietnamese to launch the Tet Offensive. This shocked the United States, and caused the war to linger on for several more years. The Tet Offensive spread from the cities of Mek ...
    Related: life magazine, thornton wilder, popular music, summer olympics, entertainment
  • About The 70s - 521 words
    About The 70'S Tonight I will be speaking about one of the most controversial eras of our time. The 70s. When terms like Pardy Hardy! Goin' Cruizin' Right On! ROCK ON!! and Shake your Booty were getting used in everyday conversation. Guys wore their hair long and in afros. Pet rocks were a kids best friend, and mood rings let you know if someone was feeling down. 8 tracks had came and gone, with cassette tapes taking over in a hurry. For the weekend fun, disco clubs were the place to be. If you didnt feel like dancing, cruising the highway while on your CB radio was the alternative, that was if the gas shortage wasnt to bad. You wouldnt have been alarmed if you saw a crazed naked guy running ...
    Related: eric clapton, saturday night, supreme court, norm, marvin
  • Alfred Hitchcock - 1,554 words
    ... pathy for a peeping Tom killer in his forties (the age of the murderer in Bloch's novel), the director proposed using a much younger character and even suggested to the writer that Perkins get the lead role(Rebello 111). When Hitchcock began production on PSYCHO, he was told that he would have to use the facilities at Revue Studios, the television division of Universal Studios, which Paramount had rented for the making of the film(Rebello 112). Although he was unable to use his regular cinematographer, Robert Burks, Hitchcock managed to convince Paramount that his special editor, George Tomasini, should be included in the production(Rebello 110). The director's desire for detail was in f ...
    Related: alfred, alfred hitchcock, hitchcock, dressing room, high school
  • Bluest Eye - 1,172 words
    Bluest Eye Toni Morisson's novel The Bluest Eye is about the life of the Breedlove family who resides in Lorain, Ohio, in the late 1930s. This family consists of the mother Pauline, the father Cholly, the son Sammy, and the daughter Pecola. The novel's focal point is the daughter, an eleven-year-old Black girl who is trying to conquer a bout with self-hatred. Everyday she encounters racism, not just from white people, but mostly from her own race. In their eyes she is much too dark, and the darkness of her skin somehow implies that she is inferior, and according to everyone else, her skin makes her even "uglier." She feels she can overcome this battle of self-hatred by obtaining blue eyes, b ...
    Related: bluest, bluest eye, the bluest eye, black girl, first person
  • Bluest Eye And Giovannis Room - 1,275 words
    ... is whole thing had been reflected from the past. A man's life had changed in many ways from the beginning of the novel we just did not know it. If David could have just confronted his fears, he might have realized that he was not afraid of anything but fear itself. The other novel that I would like to go into, is Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye. Toni Morrison and James Baldwin are similar types of writers. Because they both like to give you the present before they explain the past. Toni starts the novel off telling you that Pecola Breedlove is about to have her father's baby. And using Claudia to narrate in an adult reflective child's voice. This allows you as a reader to reflect on your ...
    Related: bluest, bluest eye, the bluest eye, cholly breedlove, blue eyes
  • Breast Cancer - 1,668 words
    Breast Cancer annon In the United States in 1995 alone, 43,063 died from breast cancer. It is the number two cancer killer and the number one cancer in females ages 15 to 54. On average if a woman gets this disease, their life expectancy drops nineteen and a half years. This cancer is within the top three cancers of all woman above the age of 15, and comprises 6% of all health care costs in the U.S. totaling an astounding 35 billion dollars a year. An average woman is said to have a one in thirty chance of getting the cancer, but if that person had family history of the disease, their chances have been measured up to a one in six chance. Sixtynine percent of AfricanAmerican women survive fro ...
    Related: breast, breast cancer, cancer, cancer institute, national cancer, national cancer institute
  • Day - 1,559 words
    Day3 I went to the library again today, hoping can find some journal or some reference books on Portalsite. But I knew it is quite difficult to find some materials in this specific field. I would still give a shoot. Half an hour past, yet I still didnt see a word about portalsite in the reference section. The reference books on computer in the library were pretty outdated (no offence^ ^), so I was not able to find anything about the newly developed field in Internet. All I could find is some general introduction to portalsite in some life-stylistic periodicals. The materials I found were surely no strong enough to support my point, or I could say they couldnt give me some point to talk about ...
    Related: grammar school, research paper, high school, attract
  • Essay 1: Fiction Analysis Question 1: Love And Acceptance - 618 words
    Essay #1: Fiction Analysis Question # 1: Love and Acceptance Tillie Olsen's I Stand Here Ironing, and Alice Walker's Everyday Use, both address the issue of a mother's guilt over how her children turn out. Both mothers blamed themselves for their daughter's problems. While I Stand Here Ironing is obviously about the mousy daughter, in Everyday Use this is camouflaged by the fact most of the action and dialog involves the mother and older sister Dee. Neither does the mother in Everyday Use say outright that she feels guilty, but we catch a glimpse of it when Dee is trying very hard to claim the handmade quilts. The mother says she did something she had never done before, "hugged Maggie to me, ...
    Related: acceptance, fiction, everyday use, alice walker, inability
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