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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: severe mental

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  • Abnormal Psychology - 1,197 words
    Abnormal Psychology In a world full of fears, perhaps the worst one a human being should haveis that to be afraid of his fellow man. The human that should be mostfeared is the one that has Anti-Social Personality Disorder or in laymensterms the psychopath. The psychopath is probably the most deviant mindthat exists and treatment is not very successful because there is not a cureor drug to control it. The solution in my mind to control the problem ofsociopaths is to let them live in colonies with each other. Through myresearch I will develop an understanding of this personality disorder andconvince you the reader that my solution might be a viable solution. Thesociopath is a combination of ot ...
    Related: abnormal, abnormal psychology, psychology, hyperactivity disorder, violent behavior
  • Abortion - 1,108 words
    Abortion May, 1990, Bill C-43 was passed into legislation, this was the bill stating that abortion should be treated like any other medical procedure. Regrettably, by 1991 this bill was passed into law. What had been considered an illegal act, could now be purchased for a small fee. The murder of unborn children would now be accepted by the Canadian government. Abortion goes against religious doctrine, it causes severe psychological effects in women who follow through with the procedure, and should be considered murder. The theologians of the catholic religion have shown that aborting fetus' goes against the will of God. According to the bible an unborn child is considered holy and sacred. B ...
    Related: abortion, clinical depression, right to life, long term effects, execute
  • Alcoholosm - 1,240 words
    Alcoholosm Within the context of our society, drinking of alcohol is a perfectly normal activity. For most people drinking a moderate amount of alcohol can be beneficial, indeed studies suggest that moderate drinking may protect against coronary heart disease by improving insulin resistance (Gold, 1991). However, for a minority of people drinking alcohol is an activity that is fraught with danger and, for a very few, is akin to taking a poison that will almost inevitably ruin their lives. Henceforth, it is important for research purposes to define who an alcoholic is and what the effects of alcohol on that person are. An alcoholic is a person who drinks excessive amounts of alcohol habituall ...
    Related: personality type, severe mental, contributing factor, personality, drinking
  • Antisocial Personality Disorder - 1,233 words
    Anti-Social Personality Disorder In a world full of fears, perhaps the worst one a human being should have is that to be afraid of his fellow man. The human that should be most feared is the one that has Anti-Social Personality Disorder or in laymen's terms the psychopath. The psychopath is probably the most deviant mind that exists and treatment is not very successful because there is not a cure or drug to control it. The solution in my mind to control the problem of sociopaths is to let them live in colonies with each other. Through my research I will develop an understanding of this personality disorder and convince you the reader that my solution might be a viable solution. The sociopath ...
    Related: anti-social personality disorder, antisocial, antisocial behavior, antisocial personality disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, disorder, hyperactivity disorder
  • Atomic - 2,186 words
    ... re were no smells. There was no movement. Every step I took made a gravelly squeak in blue-white frost. And every squeak was echoed loudly. The season of locking was over. The Earth was locked up tight (179).This description eerily resembles what many have said the Earth will look like during a nuclear winter (Stone, 62). In addition to Dr. Hoenikker and his doomsday games, Vonnegut provides an interesting analysis of atomic age society with the Bokonon religion. This religion, completely made up by Vonnegut and used in this novel, is the religion of every single inhabitant of San Lorenzo, the books imaginary banana republic. This is the island where Jonah eventually ends up, and where t ...
    Related: atomic, atomic bomb, collected poems, nuclear waste, ripper
  • Blaise Pascal - 1,504 words
    Blaise Pascal Blaise Pascal was born in Clermont France on June 19, 1623 to Etienne Pascal. His mother died when he was only 3. He was the third of four children and the only boy. He was described as a man of: small stature, poor health, loud spoken, somewhat overbearing, precious, stubbornly persevering, a perfectionist, highly pugnacious yet seeking to be humble and meek. Pascal's father had somewhat unorthodox views on education, so he decided to teach his son himself. He forbade any mathematic teachings or material to be given to him and had any such texts removed from their house. Blaise became engulfed with curiosity due to this rule. He started to work with geometry on his own at the ...
    Related: blaise pascal, pascal, religious experience, health problems, copy
  • Cerebral Palsy - 908 words
    Cerebral Palsy Katherine Dillon Child Psychology Cerebral Palsy (CP) is a term used to describe disorders of movement that result from injury to the brain. It is a problem of muscle coordination. The muscles themselves are not effected but the brain is unable to send the appropriate signals necessary to instruct the muscles when to contract or relax. Cerebral Palsy can be caused by numerous problems occurring in the prenatal period, prematurity, labor and delivery complication in the newborn period due to genetic or chromosomal abnormality to the brain may not develop in the typical way. Some environmental factors such as drugs metabolic problems, and placental dysfunction may also lead to C ...
    Related: cerebral, cerebral palsy, palsy, technical support, resource center
  • Fetal Alcojhol Syndrome - 1,654 words
    Fetal Alcojhol Syndrome Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) refers to a group of physical and mental birth defects resulting from a womens drinking alcohol heavily or at crucial stages during pregnancy. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome was first named and treated in the late 1960's. This condition results from the toxic effect of alcohol and its chemical factors on the developing fetus. FAS is the leading cause of mental retardation occurring in 1 out of every 750 births. The frequency of FAS occurs about 1.9 times out of every 1000 births according to the latest figures, and minor effects can be seen in up to 20% of pregnancies per year. This number changes drastically for women who a ...
    Related: alcohol syndrome, fetal, fetal alcohol, fetal alcohol syndrome, syndrome
  • Flowering Judas By Porter - 798 words
    Flowering Judas By Porter There are many theories on the significance of dreams and there is no definitive encyclopedia on their meanings. The ability to have one dream that is so bizarre and fantasy like and the next seem so real that it is hard to tell if it really happened or not, is quite amazing. One theory is that dreams reflect not only daily events and stresses, but also deep hidden fears and desires. It is the way the psyche copes and releases intense emotions, especially the ones most deeply repressed and denied. Katherine Anne Porter relates this phenomenon superbly in "Flowering Judas." Her complicated writing style mimics the way the main character, Laura, utilizes daily defense ...
    Related: anne porter, judas, porter, katherine anne, severe mental
  • General Theory Of Alcoholism - 1,572 words
    General Theory Of Alcoholism There are many theories of alcoholism, and some approaches explain and treat certain alcoholics better than others. One of the common themes throughout the readings is that addicts display a range of personal and situational problems. There is no "typical" addicted personality or emotional problem (Allen, 1996). Because of these facts, it comes as no surprise that there are also no typical assessment or treatment for these individuals. For instance, a medical/disease model of alcoholism may be more useful to some alcoholics than others. The point is that instead of rigidly applying one model, a counselor's goal is to use the models that are most effective to the ...
    Related: alcoholism, general theory, environmental factors, annotated bibliography, obsessed
  • Imagry In The Fall Of The House Of Usher - 1,376 words
    Imagry In The Fall Of The House Of Usher Imagery in The Fall of the House of Usher The description of the landscape in any story is important as it creates a vivid imagery of the scene and helps to develop the mood. Edgar Allan Poe is a master at using imagery to improve the effects of his stories. He tends to use the landscapes to symbolize some important aspect of the story. Also, he makes use of the landscape to produce a supernatural effect and to induce horror. In particular, Poe makes great use of these tools in The Fall of the House of Usher. This story depends on the portrayal of the house itself to create a certain atmosphere and to relate to the Usher family. In The Fall of the Hou ...
    Related: fall of the house of usher, madeline usher, roderick usher, usher, mental disorder
  • Legalization - 717 words
    Legalization Legalization of marijuana has been a controversial issue in the U.S. for the past several years. The people vs. the federal government is just one of the main debates over legalization. In the past marijuana was required to be grown on most plantations in the southern region. It could be purchased in one ounce packages for only twenty five cents. Further down the time line we find that marijuana is increasingly being used in the inner cities and suburban areas. Marijuana was considers legal in the late 1800's but a bill was passed and marijuana was quickly considered to be illegal. The federal legislation prohibiting marijuana passed at the end of 1937 congressional session was ...
    Related: drug legalization, legalization, federal government, marijuana laws, occupational
  • Marijuana For Medical Use - 1,449 words
    Marijuana For Medical Use Marijuana for Medical Use For many years the United States government has prohibited some drugs, such as marijuana, from being sold in the marketplace. Yet, even with prohibition, marijuana use has only decreased minimally. Because of its illegality, only the bad aspects of marijuana use have been made known. However, there are many positive aspects of marijuana legalization, including its application concerning medical cures. As of today, in most of the states, marijuana is classified as an illegal drug. However, due to its proven medicinal purposes, the drug should be made available for sick people to use. Marijuana has been used for multiple purposes prior to the ...
    Related: legalizing marijuana, marijuana, marijuana legalization, medical purposes, high tech
  • Mental Disorders - 1,868 words
    Mental Disorders There are many diseases and disorders that may affect the human mind. Some of these are serious, while others are minor and may not even be noticed. Some of the disorders and diseases to be covered in this report are delirium, dementia, and schizophrenia, also a discussion of specific symptoms and treatments available for the different disorders. A mental illness is defined as any disease that affects a person's mind, thoughts, emotions, personality, or behavior. For any mental illness, as in a physical illness, there are symptoms that make it possible to identify when a person is suffering from a mental disorder or illness. Some of the more common symptoms of these disorder ...
    Related: affective disorder, anxiety disorder, bipolar disorder, compulsive disorder, disorders, dissociative disorders, eating disorders
  • Multiple Personality Disorder - 1,038 words
    ... . A person with DID often presents symptoms that are common to many other mental disorders. Depression, panic disorders, sleep disorders, and suicidal tendencies are but a few of the reasons these people seek help. Furthermore, their host personality may be amnesiac with regard to their alters and/or the experiences of those alters. Their personality changes may be passed off as mood swings, or, they may have gone for a long time without experiencing a disassociative episode. These are compounded by reluctance on the part of professionals to diagnose DID, and the DID individual to be able or willing to provide necessary information. At one time, some psychiatrists began to believe that D ...
    Related: disorder, identity disorder, multiple, multiple personality disorder, personality, personality disorder, post traumatic stress disorder
  • Multiple Personality Disorder - 1,869 words
    Multiple Personality Disorder Multiple Personality Disorder, renamed dissociative identity disorder, is the suggestion that one body may serve as a home to multiple individuals, each with their own distinct personality. (Grolier encyclopedia) This suggestion is accepted by psychiatrists world wide and is recognized as a serious mental illness. However, all of the personalities that are present in an individual are normal. They act as any other normal personality, because the multiple personalities have their own memories which dictate the personality of the individual or alter personality.(Dr. McQueen) There can be over one hundred personalities in a body, some not even human. (There have be ...
    Related: disorder, dissociative identity disorder, identity disorder, multiple, multiple personality disorder, personality, personality disorder
  • Music Therapy - 1,527 words
    Music Therapy Music Therapy During the past thirty years, concepts in the mental health profession have undergone continuous and dramatic changes. A relatively new type of therapy is musical therapy, which incorporates music into the healing process. Music therapy also is changing, and its concepts, procedures, and practices need constant reevaluation in order to meet new concepts of psychiatric treatment. The idea of music as a healing influence which could affect health and behavior is as least as old as the writings of Aristotle and Plato. The 20th century discipline began after World War I and World War II when community musicians of all types, both amateur and professional, went to Vete ...
    Related: american music, background music, music, music therapy, therapy
  • Schizophrenia - 492 words
    Schizophrenia Schizophrenia is a severe mental illness characterized by a variety of symptoms, including loss of contact with reality, bizarre behavior, disorganized thinking and speech, decreased emotional expressiveness, and social withdrawal. Usually only some of these symptoms occur in any one person. The term schizophrenia comes from Greek words meaning "split mind." However, contrary to common belief, schizophrenia does not refer to a person with a split personality or multiple personality.To observers, schizophrenia may seem like madness or insanity. Perhaps more than any other mental illness, schizophrenia has a debilitating effect on the lives of the people who suffer from it. A per ...
    Related: schizophrenia, social services, health professionals, mental health, inappropriate
  • Since The Evolution Of Man, Infants Have Been Born With Severe Illnesses These Infants May Be Able To Survive Due To Advancin - 1,352 words
    Since the evolution of man, infants have been born with severe illnesses. These infants may be able to survive due to advancing technologies, but are left with possible and probable defects. Many infants will die even though they are being treated because they are not equipped to sustain life. These circumstances have led to the debatable issue of infant euthanasia, or mercy killing, to allow these babies an end to their suffering, and die peacefully. While many people feel that euthanasia is murder, infant euthanasia should be legalized to spare terminally ill newborns of long, painful deaths, and to spare them of possible life-long disabilities. Euthanasia is said to be morally wrong by pr ...
    Related: evolution, illnesses, severe mental, care unit, life expectancy
  • Stds - 1,448 words
    Std's Sexually Transmitted Diseases Sex is a popular subject; it is on television, in advertisements, in magazines, and practically everywhere. One very serious side effect of an increase of sexual activity is the risk of contracting sexually transmitted diseases. They affect more than twelve million Americans each year. Sexually transmitted diseases are becoming common and widely spread throughout Americans because of unprotected sex, permiscuity, and multiple sex partners. Some of the most commonly found sexually transmitted diseases are gonorrhea, chlamydia, HIV/AIDS, and syphilis. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention estimates there are six hundred-fifty thousand new infections ...
    Related: stds, disease control, central nervous, american medical, inflammatory
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