Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: beaver

  • 55 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 1960s - 413 words
    1960S The 1960s were the age of "sex, drugs, and rock-n-roll." People had a new outlook to life. Women began wearing shorts, skirts, and clothing they normally did not wear. Almost anything was permissive. There was a full-scale sexual revolution. Decriminalization of homosexuality was prevalent and sex education was now allowed to be taught in schools. By taking the mystery out of sex (by learning about it), it will not be detrimental to society. Television shows also started including sex in hopes of lowering STDs and the birth rate. In 1963, birth control was developed and was known as "Katy bar the door." In the early 1960s, movies, books, and plays took on taboo subjects that intrigued ...
    Related: legalized prostitution, martin luther, sex education, premarital, television
  • 65279 - 969 words
    WAR OF 1812 In this essay I will be discussing the major events and battles that took place during the War of 1812. The war was a conflict fought between the United States and Great Britain. It started in 1812 and lasted until the spring of 1815. My thesis statement is: The War of 1812 was a war that neither side won. There were four main causes for the war taking place. These were impressment, boundary problems, the Warhawks, and the British supplying the Ohio Country Indians with weapons and supplies. Henry Clay, who was the leader of the Warhawks, convinced Americans that defeating British North America, "is only a matter of marching." He knew that Britain wouldnt have any troops to spare ...
    Related: war of 1812, microsoft encarta, william henry harrison, naval, canadian
  • A Lesson From Oliver - 5,155 words
    A Lesson From Oliver by David Jorgensen Like any other morning I was up at four, the day Oliver met with his violent death. At four in the morning the grass is wet. Now, it's still wet at 6 a.m. and even at seven, and these tend to be the hours of choice for most people wishing to appreciate the phenomenon of grass wetness. But it's a tragedy of economics that, when work starts at 5 a.m., one is not afforded the same time-options for grass appreciation as members of the sane world. Nor was this tragedy confined to my having to appreciate the wet grass while in a metabolic state more suited to hibernation. Four a.m. was my only chance to absorb all of northern Ontario's summer morning treasur ...
    Related: lesson, oliver, decision making, prime minister, initiated
  • A Separate Peace - 768 words
    A Separate Peace Breaking The Mold In John Knowle's, A Separate Peace, there is a transformation in all the key elements in the book, from the rivers to the tree to the seasons to the characters. The transformation is specifically seen in Leper, Gene, and Phineas. These three young men experience a change not just because of the transitions through adolescence. These changes also come about because of the war, the school, and an injury. Leper Lepellier is a very odd young man. He is quiet and is finds himself always taken by surprise. He really is not popular and that does not concern him in any way. Leper really has no true friends at the Devon school, but talks to Gene. He entertains himse ...
    Related: separate peace, john knowles, lonely, collecting
  • A Separate Peace: Chapter 1 - 5,662 words
    ... truth, the shadowy, elusive truth of an instant that is already beginning to fade in memory. Gene is about to make a full confession--or he thinks he is--when Dr. Stanpole and the nurse arrive. The following day Finny is sent home to recuperate. The summer session comes to an end, appropriately enough for Gene, for until now summer had represented freedom, sports, and running outdoors, with Finny as the light and life of it all. Now all that has changed. A month later, after a sojourn at home, Gene heads back to school for his senior year. On the way he makes a detour to call on Finny. NOTE: The "surprise" reunion is no surprise to Finny, who appears to have been waiting anxiously in hop ...
    Related: separate peace, ultimate punishment, last time, self awareness, burning
  • African American Community - 3,040 words
    ... stood that his name would not appear in the program credits or advertising. For twenty weeks, the Mahalia Jackson Show ran on television for a half-hour each episode. Beginning in September 1954, the show did not last very long. Mahalias show featured her singing traditional gospels and spirituals with a few miscellaneous songs but the show was missing a major component. (2) The show was in need of a sponsor and began to go out of business. The show went from thirty minutes airtime to ten minutes and eventually ended in February 1955. This was not the end of Mahalia's television appearances however. The TV station, WBBM-TV of Chicago asked Mahalia to be a guest on their program, "In Town ...
    Related: african, african american, american, american community, race relations
  • Battle Of Britain During World War Ii - 3,029 words
    Battle Of Britain During World War Ii Battle of Britain Director: Guy Hamilton Screenwriter: Wilfred Greatorex and James Kennaway Film Genre: War Cast: Harry Andrews, Michael Caine, Trevor Howard This film is about the Battle of Britain during World War II. It happened in 1940. This movie was made 29 years later in 1969. The Nazis tried to invade Britain. The Royal Air Force of Britain fought a grave battle against the Nazis to prevent the invasion. Most of the fighting was in the air. There were lots of fighting scenes between the German planes and the RAF and their allies. This film is pretty realistic. I thought that the air battles were pretty realistic. For a film that was made in 1969, ...
    Related: battle of britain, britain, second world, world war i, world war ii
  • Battle Of Britain During World War Ii - 3,116 words
    ... were desperately running out of water and running out of fuel. They found a little oasis where there was a little bit of water. They stayed there for quite a while. German soldiers were on their tail and also looking for water. There were a great many more Germans than allies. The allied soldiers held off the Germans at the fort. The film was a little bit unrealistic. I think that the desert was realistic, but the ending was a little bit too unrealistic. It was too much of a Hollywood ending. It looked like all was going to be over for Bogart's character Joe Gunn. But almost single-handedly he and another soldier outfoxed hundreds of German soldiers into believing that there was plenty ...
    Related: battle of britain, britain, world war ii, steven spielberg, pearl harbor
  • Biomes Of The World - 1,106 words
    Biomes Of The World A biome, also known as life zones, consists of all plants, animals, and other organisms, as well the physical environment in a particular area. A biome is characterized by its' plant life, climate, and location. The climate and physical features determine the boundaries of a biome. A biome is made up of many different ecosystems. The ecosystems tend to have the same pants and animals as neighboring biomes around the boundaries. The major biomes are the tundra, taiga, tropical rain forest, temperate forests, desert, grassland, savanna, chaparral, and marine. Each biome has it's own characteristics such as the tundra. The tundra is a biome that is located in the Northern He ...
    Related: south africa, polar bear, flowering plants, alaska, trout
  • Boston Tea Party Leads To Independence - 1,009 words
    Boston Tea Party Leads To Independence Boston Tea Party Leads to Independence The Boston Tea Party was an important and influential part of America becoming independent from Great Britain. America was formed on the basis of being a free country, however Great Britain held it back from being autonomous. Britain controlled everything about America. Though America was free of some things like religion and politics it was still taxed on many things. Following the Seven Years War, England went through a serious financial crisis as a result of which it was obliged to impose taxes on many products. Among them in particular were goods destined for the colonies, including wine, sugar, molasses, and t ...
    Related: boston, boston harbor, boston tea party, declaration of independence, financial crisis
  • Canadian Fur Trade - 1,435 words
    Canadian Fur Trade The Canadian fur trade, which grew out of the fishing industry, began as a small business, but would expand and become not only the exploiter of a primary Canadian resource, but the industry around which the country of Canada itself developed. The fur trade started shortly after the discovery of the Grand Banks off the coast of Newfoundland. The fishermen who fished there were the first people who traded furs with the Indians; this trade was a secondary means of profit for the fishermen. Later this secondary industry became a profitable big business due to changes in European fashion, and fashion techniques. While the fur trade brought economic growth and land discoveries, ...
    Related: canadian, fur trade, adverse effects, america after, stroke
  • Canadian Fur Trade - 1,385 words
    ... upplies, more primitive implements disappeared and the methods of making them were forgotten This dependance was what destroyed the culture and freedom of the Natives of Canada involved in the fur trade. Once the Natives had forgotten their old ways they became dependent on European goods to survive. So long as the fur trade persisted, the Natives could survive, but by the mid nineteenth century the animals they hunted had almost disappeared. The Natives could not even rely on the fisheries for enough food to survive anymore: moose and deer had virtually been exterminated from the forest country, and fisheries were said to be unreliable . These starving Natives started drifting into colo ...
    Related: canadian, canadian journal, canadian society, fur trade, twentieth century
  • Catcher In The Rye - 838 words
    Catcher In The Rye J.D. Salingers novel The Catcher in the Rye depicts life in the fifties as seen through the eyes of a disillusioned teenager. There is a vast difference between the life of a real 1950s family and that of a typical family portrayed through the television sitcoms of the day. The Catcher in the Rye is filled with examples that demonstrate how different real societies are. In the fifties, quaint and perfect families dominated television home-life. The mother or"house-wife" on television was always perfect. She would always don a housedress, frilly apron, and four-inch high heels, all this along with her perfect makeup and hair. You could always count on your TV mom to be up a ...
    Related: catcher, catcher in the rye, the catcher in the rye, world war ii, orange juice
  • Child Observation Report - 1,273 words
    Child Observation Report Robert Reitz Dev. Psych Dr. Trimble 4/13/00 Child Observation Report For this project, I observed my mother's preschool class for three hours, and three kids that she baby-sits on weekends for three hours. Most of the kids that are in the preschool class were three years old, but there was one five year old. The kids I helped baby-sit were two twin three year old girls, and one five year old. When I first arrived at the preschool, the kids seemed very shy towards me and they did not seem like they were very sociable. I was a stranger to them, and I would have to guess that all of the children were experiencing a little bit of stranger anxiety. I talked to my mother a ...
    Related: observation, sibling rivalry, language development, begun, conversation
  • Colonization - 1,422 words
    Colonization Essay #1 Although New England and the Chesapeake regions were settled largely by people of English origin, by 1700 the regions had evolved into two distinct societies. I have described both societies in an attempt to demonstrate their developments. Virginia Colony In 1607 a group of merchants established Englands first permanent colony in North America at Jamestown, Virginia. They operated as a joint-stock company that allowed them to sell shares of stock in their company and use the pooled investment capital to outfit and supply overseas expeditions. This joint stock company operated under a charter from James I with a concern for bringing Christian religion to the native peopl ...
    Related: colonization, harvard college, social institutions, the bible, indian
  • Comparing French And English Relations With Native Americans - 367 words
    Comparing French and English relations with Native Americans The relationships with the Native Americans when dealing with the French and English, were both a rough journey. At first the French seemed to have the upper hand in their relationship of trading furs in Europe. Furs from the skins of deer, beaver, and other animals were all taken in the 1600s. The job of trapping the animals came from the Native Americans. They also collected their furs, and then traded them to the French. This trading business made for the shape of New France. Long, narrow colonies were built along the waterways of the St. Lawrence River and the Great Lakes to insure great transporting opportunities. Although, th ...
    Related: comparing, native, native americans, plymouth colony, new england
  • Drinking Problem - 620 words
    Drinking Problem How do you tell if someone has a drinking problem? It is often a judgment made after assessing the persons drinking habits, how much and when, the effect on him emotionally and physically also family members, friends, employers, and the law. Although there are some ways to find out whether or not someone has a drinking problem, there is also no single set of criteria, which defines the problem drinker. You can ask whether the drinking has affected the persons physical and emotional well being. Has his relationships with his family and friends been affected? Has the persons job been affected, missing work because of drinking, been reprimanded by his employer? Has the person b ...
    Related: drinking, different ages, native americans, pacific northwest, coast
  • Family Meet The Simpsons - 1,683 words
    Family - Meet The Simpsons Meet the Simpsons Over time, the definition of what exactly family means has changed with time. Usually, what constitutes making up a family is relative to a specific culture, but as always, there are exceptions to the rule. Ever since the golden age of television had sprung upon American culture, television has tried to mimic the ideal American family through it's programming. Even as early as the 1950's, television producers made programming that would represent what exactly the ideal American family was. Take for example the show Leave It to Beaver. While I am not going to go in detail about each character, I am going to summarize the family structure and the ro ...
    Related: american family, family life, family member, family structure, family ties, homer simpson, simpsons
  • Feminism - 905 words
    Feminism Feminism can be roughly defined as a movement that seeks to enhance the quality of womens lives by impacting the norms and moves of a society based on male dominance and subsequent female subordination. The means of change in the work place, politically, and domestically. Women have come a long way since the 19th century. Women have been trying to prove to the male dominant world that they are equal. They can perform and complete any tasks equal, or in some cases better than man. Feminism has changed the definition of men in many ways. Women in the work place have transposed dramatically since the 19th and mid 20th century. Even if women had any education in the 19th century they we ...
    Related: feminism, political world, television shows, cady stanton, norms
  • Genocide - 1,677 words
    Genocide The Genocide of the Chiricahua Indian Tribe United States history is taught in public schools when we are old enough to understand its importance. Teachings of honorable plights by our forefathers to establish this great nation are common. However, specific details of this establishment seem to slip through the cracks of our educational curriculum. Genocide by definition is the deliberate and systematic destruction of a racial, political or cultural group. The Chiricahua Indian Tribe of the American southwest and northern Mexico suffered almost complete annihilation at the hands of the American policy makers of the late nineteenth century, policy makers that chose to justify their m ...
    Related: genocide, religious belief, late 1800s, american policy, relationships
  • 55 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3