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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: serotonin

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  • A View Of Modern Societ - 763 words
    A View Of Modern Societ I wrote this to try and take the reader on a journey. What you read here is a direct reflection of the current state of our society. I want to point out to you, the reader, exactly what is happening in the undercurrents of the digital frontier. Each image and video clip that you witness is part of the greater whole of the new Internet society that we all live in. It is your voice that has made this view popular. We are all fed up with the bland and tasteless media that is shoved down our collective throats day after day. When you go outside and see a billboard for GAP clothing or SONY consumer devices you may not realize that you are being programmed with each glance. ...
    Related: university school, mass communication, current state, sony, frontier
  • Aggression Biological Theory Vs Behaviorist Theory - 1,254 words
    Aggression - Biological Theory vs Behaviorist Theory Aggression is a problem that affects all members of society. There is no doubt that aggression pays off for some. Parents who yell and threaten punishment get results. The child who hits the hardest gets the toy. The brother who is willing to be the most vicious in a fight wins. The teacher who gives the hardest test and threatens to flunk the most students usually gets the most study time from students. The spouse who threatens to get the maddest gets their way. The male who acts the most macho and aggressive gets the praise of certain groups of males. For decades psychologists have attempted to find the causes of aggression. The focus of ...
    Related: aggression, aggression in children, behaviorist, biological, biological factors
  • Agression - 2,144 words
    Agression Aggression Aggression is a critical part of animal existence, which is an inherent driving force to humans, as we, too, are animals. The source of aggression within humans is a long summative list, but before trying to understand its source one must apply a working definition of aggression. Aggressive behavior is defined by Encyclopedia Britannica as any action of an animal that serves to injure an opponent or prey animal or to cause an opponent to retreat. (7) David G. Myers states that aggression is any physical or verbal behavior intended to hurt or destroy.(9) There are many types of aggressive behaviors, which can be differentiated from the factual act to the hidden motives. F ...
    Related: agression, slave labor, final solution, verbal behavior, track
  • Alcoholism And Sleep - 1,609 words
    Alcoholism And Sleep The Effects of Alcohol on Sleep Many people usually associate alcohol with sleep and sleepiness. However, the effects of alcohol on sleep are mostly negative ones, and these two things should not be interrelated at all. In order to understand how these two things are related, one must explore the depths of two different topics: alcohol and sleep. With this knowledge, one can begin to understand how alcohol and sleep are related and what effects alcohol has on sleep. Sleep is a very active process, just like consciousness. Sleep is controlled largely by nerve centers in the lower brain stem, where the base of the brain joins the spinal cord. It is here where certain nerve ...
    Related: alcoholism, sleep apnea, sleep deprivation, sleep patterns, older persons
  • Alzheimers Disease - 1,259 words
    ... ors leading outside (Alzheimers disease sufferers are known to wander off); clearing floors of clutter; and reducing the contents of closets in order to simplify choices (Alzheimer, 1992, p.17). Costs are typically paid for by the victim's family. Many of these, and other more expensive modifications are introduced in long-term care settings. They help in maintaining the safety and security of the victim as well as reducing their confusion. The patient's and the family's condition should be assessed every six months (Alzheimer, 1992, p.21). In response to constantly changing needs, the aspects of care must be constantly modified. Other issues that usually arise during the care of the pat ...
    Related: alzheimer's disease, alzheimers disease, muscular dystrophy, long term care, alleviating
  • Anorexia Nervosa Is Refusal To Maintain Body Weight At Or Above A Minimally Normal Weight For Age And Height Intense Fear Of - 1,336 words
    Anorexia nervosa is refusal to maintain body weight at or above a minimally normal weight for age and height Intense fear of gaining weight or becoming fat, even though underweight. Disturbance in the way in which one's body weight or shape is experienced, undue influence of body weight or shape on self-evaluation, or denial of the seriousness of the current low body weight. This condition is both a physical illness and a psychiatric illness. Anorexia nervosa can be a very severe illness, including a risk of death from starvation. This illness occurs most often in young women. About 5% to 10% of people with anorexia nervosa are men (Larson). Anorexia nervosa means in Greek and Latin roots la ...
    Related: anorexia, anorexia nervosa, body weight, height, intense, nervosa, refusal
  • Anxiety Disorders - 1,208 words
    Anxiety Disorders Anxiety is a normal reaction to a threatening situation and results from an increase in the amount of adrenaline from the sympathetic nervous system. This increased adrenaline speeds the heart and respiration rate, raises blood pressure, and diverts blood flow to the muscles. These physical reactions are appropriate for escaping from danger but when they cause anxiety in many situations throughout the day, they may be detrimental to a normal lifestyle. An anxiety disorder is a disorder where feelings of fear, apprehension, or anxiety are disruptive or cause distortions in behavior, (Coon, 526); they are psychiatric illnesses that are not useful for normal functioning. At ti ...
    Related: anxiety, anxiety disorder, disorders, panic disorder, behavior therapy
  • Bipolar Disorder - 729 words
    Bipolar Disorder Bipolar disorder is perhaps one of the most tragic mood disorders, because it virtually taunts with the affected persons mind. Bipolar disorder (also known as manic-depressive disorder) is a mental condition in which the person alternates between feelings of mania and depression (Kalat, 614). These feelings are extreme opposites, and thus create tremendous mental and physical stress on the person affected. This unfortunate disorder affects one to two percent of the adult population. Before bipolar disorder can be fully understood, the two main mood stages must first be identified. During an endless bout with bipolar disorder, a person experiences many stages of mania and dep ...
    Related: bipolar, bipolar disorder, depressive disorder, disorder, different types
  • Bipolar Disorder 2 - 1,276 words
    Bipolar Disorder 2 Bipolar affective disorder has been a mystery since the 16th century. History has shown that this disorder can appear in almost anyone. Even the great painter Vincent Van Gogh is believed to have had bipolar disorder. It is clear that in our society many people live with bipolar disorder; however, despite the amount of people suffering from it, we are still waiting for explanations for the causes and cure. The one fact of which we are aware is that bipolar disorder severely undermines its' victims ability to obtain and maintain social and occupational success. Because bipolar disorder has such debilitating symptoms, it is important that we keep looking for explanations of ...
    Related: affective disorder, bipolar, bipolar disorder, disorder, problems associated
  • Brain Scans Show Pattern In Violent Behavior - 485 words
    Brain Scans Show Pattern In Violent Behavior Murderers and other people prone to violence have distinct brain patterns that can be scanned and that might be changed with drugs and other therapies, researchers said. Most people's brain can rein in overreaction to emotions such as fear or anger. But in pathologically violent people, this control system gets short-circuited. Several studies have shown this rewiring can be seen in images such as PET(positron emission tomography) scans. Impulsive,affective aggression may be the product of a failure of emotion regulation, University of Wisconsin-Madison psychologist Richard Davidson and colleagues wrote in their report, published in journal scienc ...
    Related: brain, violent behavior, research center, positron emission tomography, adaptive
  • Causes, Symptoms, Complications And Treatments For The Eating Disorder Anorexia Nervosa - 1,303 words
    Causes, Symptoms, Complications And Treatments For The Eating Disorder Anorexia Nervosa. Causes, Symptoms, Complications and Treatments for the eating disorder Anorexia Nervosa. Eating disorders are devastating behavioral maladies brought on by a complex interplay of factors, which may include emotional and personality disorder, family pressure, a possible genetic or biological susceptibility and a culture in which there is an over abundance of food and an obsession with thinness. Eating disorders are generally characterized as bulimia nervosa, anorexia nervosa and eating disorders not other wise specified. According to the World of Psychology anorexia is defined as an eating disorder charac ...
    Related: anorexia, anorexia nervosa, binge eating, bulimia nervosa, compulsive disorder, disorder, eating disorder
  • Cocaine - 1,412 words
    Cocaine Cocaine is an alkaloid found in leaves of a South American shrub. It is a powerfully reinforcing stimulant. The drug induces a sense of exhilaration in the user primarily by blocking the dopamine from going into your brain. Life-long happiness will be genetically pre-programmed. "Peak experiences" will become a natural part of everyday mental health. Cocaine, alas, offers merely a tragically delusive short-cut. Before Columbian times, the coca leaf was reserved for Inca royalty. The natives subsequently used it for mystical, religious, social, nutritional and medicinal purposes. They exploited its stimulant properties to ward off fatigue and hunger, enhance endurance, and to promote ...
    Related: cocaine, human experience, sherlock holmes, drug testing, wonderful
  • Depression - 1,179 words
    Depression Human nutrition is the study of how food affects the health and survival of the human body. Human beings require food to grow, reproduce, and maintain good health. Without the food our bodies could not stay warm, build or repair tissues, and maintain a good heartbeat. Eating the right foods could help us rid certain diseases or recover faster other illness occur. These and other important functions are dueled by chemical substances in our food called nutrients. Nutrients play a major role in maintaining the bodies organs in functioning at its p0roper level. The Basal Metabolism Rate (BMR) is in influenced by the body site and on state of nutrition. The BMR is an important diagnost ...
    Related: major depression, manic depression, environmental factors, depressive disorder, percentage
  • Depression And Suicide In Adolescents - 1,126 words
    Depression And Suicide In Adolescents Depression and Suicide In Adolescents. As a state of extreme grief and all-encompassing sadness, depression, if left untreated, may lead to a deliberate murder of oneself, suicide. Depression effects individuals with out discriminating against race, gender, or age, yet among adolescents, the incidents of depression have increased significantly. Such increase is the potential cause of the rise of suicide rates amidst adolescents. Therefore it is imperative to treat depression before attempts of suicide are made, for if neglected, such attempts could become successful. Through out the years, adolescence has been regarded as the most confusing and difficult ...
    Related: depression inventory, suicide, suicide rates, social interaction, american medical
  • Diagnosis And Treatment Of Depression In The Elderly - 1,185 words
    ... nitive therapy on elderly depressed patients. In addition to the success, "the US National Institute of Health consensus conference highlighted the need for continued development in this area (January 1997)." The types of psychological treatments used on the elderly are specifically designed for aged persons. The central idea in cognitive therapy is to take the negative self-opinion and teach ways to reverse this opinion. Validation and reminiscence are examples of techniques used to get the patient to reflect on the accomplishments of his or her lifetime. Hopefully, this will bring back some pleasant memories of family or other accomplishments. It also allows the patient to look at the ...
    Related: diagnosis, elderly, elderly people, elderly persons, treating depression, treatment of depression, treatment options
  • Diagnosis Of Patience - 1,151 words
    Diagnosis Of Patience Jennifer came to me several failed visits and theripys through out her teen years. She had, like it past reports complained of "always feeling worried and anxious". She often talked on how going out to social settings and relationships was so difficult. Believing that it was her fate to always be alone. She felt very uncomfortable around crowds as if they would turn on her in angry or disapproval. Jennifer had came to me after a referral from a mutual friend of mine. One that she had built a friendship with the current job that she had worked continuously for 2 yrs. Past History: Talking about her past relationships, I found she hadn't been intimate with any single pers ...
    Related: diagnosis, patience, social skills, short term, dread
  • Dieting And Weight - 1,312 words
    Dieting And Weight People are, as the expression goes, what they eat. After all, the muscles in a persons body, and the blood flowing through their veins, are all supplied by the food that he or she consumes. Understandably, these foods would also have an effect on the way the brain functions. The foods we eat have measurable effects on the bodys performance, they may prove to have an even more critical influence on how the brain handles its tasks. The idea that the right foods, or the natural neurochemicals they contain, can enhance mental capabilities such as by defusing stress. (Blun 2) In the 1970s, Dr. Richard Wurtman of MIT and his graduate student, John Ferstrom, discovered that the n ...
    Related: dieting, problem solving, digestive system, high blood pressure, fried
  • Dothiepin Vs Fluoxetine Mechanism Of Action And Pharmacodynamics - 1,290 words
    Dothiepin Vs. Fluoxetine (Mechanism Of Action And Pharmacodynamics) Comparison Between Mechanism of Action and Pharmacodynamics of Dothiepin and Fluoxetine Description of medicines Mechanism of action and pharmacodynamics Dothiepin Dothiepin is a tricyclic antidepressant. It acts by promoting the effectiveness of several amines (dopamine, norepinephrine, and 5-hydroxytryptamine, which is also known as 5HT and serotonin). It functions by inhibiting their reuptake at the terminals of nerve cells, thus leading to their prolonged presence at the synaptic cleft and an increased effect on the neuron.(1) The reuptake pumps for the above amines are responsible for reducing the concentration of these ...
    Related: mechanism, gastrointestinal tract, heart disease, new zealand, linear
  • Ecstasy - 787 words
    Ecstasy MDMA, or Ecstasy, was first made in a lab in Germany in 1912. The German pharmaceutical company E. Merck patented it in 1914, not as a medicine, but as a chemical for making more useful drugs later on. MDMA was forgotten until 1953, when the United States Army funded a secret University of Michigan study to develop chemical weapons. After learning that MDMA was non-toxic, the government put it back on the shelf. Rumor says that the drug was tested for mind control purposes, or as a "truth drug", but there is not actual evidence of that. In 1978, Alexander Shulgin wrote a book detailing the MDMA experience called Phenethylamines I Have Known and Loved: A Chemical Love Story. Many psyc ...
    Related: ecstasy, drug enforcement, united states army, medical research, paranoia
  • Ectasy - 1,400 words
    Ectasy Drugs are a ridiculous way to handle all kinds of things. A recent Teen Magazine survey noted that: 86% of respondents had tried drugs before, 77% of whom are under 16. 63% have tried marijuana, 16% have taken a trip, and 32% have no worries about drugs. That is pretty heavy. The top 3 reasons for taking drugs were: Enjoyment, Dealing with pressure, and Peer Pressure. Do you want to end up in hospital, severely injured or DEAD? Anna Wood was a happy 15-year-old girl who was popular, on top of the world, nearly perfectuntil one Saturday night, when her friends decided to take her out to a rave party. She told her parents she was going go-kart racing and left to an Ultimo nightclub, whe ...
    Related: illegal drug, recent studies, orlando florida, dutch, marijuana
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