Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: sculptural

  • 23 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • Ancient Peruvian Ceramics Of The North Coast - 1,143 words
    Ancient Peruvian Ceramics Of The North Coast Ancient Peruvian Ceramics of the North Coast March 11, 1997 The first pottery pieces found in Peru were made somewhere between 1500 and 1000 b.p. The pieces were found in the central Andean region where a religious cult lived. This cult was called Chavn, after the best known ceremonial center, Chavn de Huntar. The religious center was the home to massive temples that were highly embellished with low relief sculptures of gods, animals, and symbols. The pottery found in the area where vessels that were well made and highly decorated with a similar motif as the temples. But the evolution of Peruvian pottery becomes somewhat confusing and complex afte ...
    Related: ceramics, coast, peruvian, daily life, different cultures
  • Art As A Reflection Of Anciant Civilization - 1,373 words
    Art As A Reflection Of Anciant Civilization Art as Reflection of Anciant Civilization Ancient Egytian and Greek sociaties both made significant contributions to western civilization, specificaly in the areas of politics and social structure. The political system of antient Egypt was primarily based on the religios belife that the Pharoah was a divine entity, while Greek politics were based in a democratic system that valued individuals in a unique way. The poitical and social advancments of both Greek and Egyption civilizations are best reflected in the advancement of each cultures artwork. In the early kingdom of the Egyption civilization the Pharoah rulled as a God-King and dictated the re ...
    Related: civilization, egyptian civilization, greek civilization, reflection, western civilization
  • Auguste Rodin - 1,079 words
    Auguste Rodin Like some artists, Rodin was not an overnight success. Even though he was rejected numerous times from art schools because of his art style, he prevailed in the end. Rodin, like many artists, got their inspiration from other great and famous artists. In Rodin's case, his inspiration came from Michelangelo. In Rodin's more famous works, one can see the similarities between the two artists' artwork. Rodin's parents were not wealthy, therefore, he was not able to attend an art school of his choice. His father, however, did send him to Petite cole, "a training ground for commercial draftsman and practiciens--cutters and finishers of work in stone" (Hale 38). At the age of seventeen ...
    Related: auguste, rodin, beaux arts, famous works, salon
  • Constantine Brancusi - 1,565 words
    Constantine Brancusi Constantine Brancusi I found it very difficult to find information on Constantine Brancusi in hard copy, therefore, you will see at the end of my paper that all of my sources are websites. The little information I did locate on the artist was very, very little. Therefore, I combined the small amount of information with some research I found on artists that were strongly influenced by Brancusi. Brancusi's imprint on contemporary sculptural practice ranges from the dissemination of furniture-oriented sculpture and the emerging topos of architectural folly to new paradigms for public art. At the same time many postwar artists engaging in a dialogue with his legacy have read ...
    Related: brancusi, constantine, research paper, social environment, london
  • Copyright Protection - 1,176 words
    Copyright Protection A copyright is the right to produce, reproduce, and transform any original work. Copyrights are only given to original works that fall under the "following seven categories: Literary works, Musical works including accompanying any works, Dramatic works including accompanying music, Choreographic works, Graphical and sculptural works, Motion pictures and other audiovisual works, Sound recordings, and Architectural works"1. Under the Canadian copyright act any published or unpublished original work upon creation will receive automatic copyright protection. Though automatic copyright protection is given to original works the benefits of having ones copyright registered (Cop ...
    Related: copyright, copyright infringement, copyright laws, copyright protection, united states copyright
  • Cubism - 1,295 words
    Cubism Cubism is one of the first forms of abstract art. Cubism was a movement in painting that sought to break down objects into basic shapes of cubes, spheres, cylinders, and cones. Cubism originated in France and was influenced by African sculptures and by Paul Cezanne. The first cubist works were those in which objects, landscapes, and people are represented as many-sided solids. This enables you to see various views of the object at the same time. Later, cubism changed using a flatter type of abstraction, in which the complete pattern, becomes more important, and the objects represented are largely indecipherable. At first, most artists painted with little color. Most paintings were eit ...
    Related: cubism, modern technology, more important, modern times, cezanne
  • Doni Holy Family - 298 words
    Doni Holy Family An interesting case in point is his earliest known painting, the Doni Tondo. Tondo means round. It was a holy family, painted in tempera on a wooden panel about four feet in diameter with an ornate, deeply carved, gold leaf frame almost as much a work of art in itself as the painting it holds. Joseph, in the middle ground, hands a rambunctious Christ child over to his mother who reaches for the boy over her right shoulder while just beyond the parapet is John the Baptist, and beyond that, a group of five, nude, pagan youths bear witness to Michelangelo's preoccupation with the human figure even in such an unlikely context. The figures of the holy family have solid sculptural ...
    Related: holy, holy family, christ child, sistine chapel, julius
  • Egyptmexican Pyramids - 1,108 words
    Egypt&Mexican Pyramids Mysteries of the Ancient World For many centuries people have been fascinated by ancient cultures and treasures. During the last two centuries the science of archeology and modern inventions allowed people to get inside of the Egyptian and Mayan pyramids and discover the treasures of Egyptian pharaohs and Mayan rulers. Most of what we know about Egypt we owe to the pyramids. Thanks to Egyptian belief in the afterlife we can now find out about the civilization that existed nearly five thousand years ago. Egyptian culture is not the only culture that left us its heritage in pyramids. In America we find pyramids build by civilizations of Olmec and Maya about 7th century C ...
    Related: egyptian pyramids, pyramids, west side, building blocks, chamber
  • Expressionism Is A Much Less Important Current In Sculpture Than In Painting, Since The Ethnographic Sculpture By The Fauves - 1,580 words
    Expressionism is a much less important current in sculpture than in painting, since the ethnographic sculpture by the Fauves might have evoked a strong response among sculptors Only one important sculptor shared in this rediscovery Brancusi, a Rumanian, moved to Paris to study advanced art around 1904 But he was more interested in the formal simplicity and coherence of primitive carvings than in their savage expressiveness; this is evidenced in The Kiss which was executed in 1909 Brancusi had a 'genius of ommission' - to Brancusi a monument is an upright slab, symmetrical and immobile - a permanent marker like the styles of the ancients and he disturbed the basic shape as little as possible ...
    Related: ethnographic, expressionism, modern sculpture, sculpture, african culture
  • Gentle Giants - 1,363 words
    Gentle Giants Michelangelo and Renaissance Religion Michelangelo Buonarroti lived in a time when the medieval aspects of Christianity were overwhelmed by the upheaval of the Reformation. His art portrays this change in religious philosophy by discerning the major trends and objectives of the Renaissance. His works show us...the changing world around him (Richmond 4). In addition, Michelangelo seriously impacted generations of artists to come. The Renaissance was a rebirth that led to new ways of thinking in the sciences, philosophy, and architecture, as well as painting and sculpture (Spence 6). This period of European history, beginning in the fourteenth-century, saw a renewed interest in t ...
    Related: gentle, giants, michelangelo buonarroti, florence italy, flame
  • George Sugarman A Sculpture - 1,680 words
    George Sugarman (A Sculpture) A Polychrome Profusion; sculptor George Sugarman, Fine Arts Building, New York, New York BYLINE: RUBINSTEIN, RAPHAEL Best known today for his public art, George Sugarman began his career with formally eccentric painted-wood sculptures. In a revelatory New York exhibition, early pieces were shown alongside the 86-year-old artist's more recent aluminum work. In the course of 1998, there were a number of important sculpture exhibitions in New York galleries and museums, including the Museum of Modern Art's Tony Smith retrospective, Dia's presentation of Richard Serra's Torqued Ellipses, and a group of David Smith's late painted-steel works at Gagosian Gallery. For ...
    Related: sculpture, fine arts, next decade, first half, artist
  • Gothic Sculpture - 395 words
    Gothic Sculpture In the Gothic period, remarkable sculpture was produced in France, Germany, and Italy. As in Romanesque times, much of it was made in conjunction with church architecture, although sculptured figures are also found on tombs, pulpits, and other church furnishings. France The great cathedral at Chartres exemplifies the stylistic evolution of the Gothic, which can be traced in viewing its portals. Its west entrance, the earliest, built in the mid-12th century, displays rigid, columnar figures with schematic drapery and similar, almost undifferentiated facial expressions; the later portals, on the north and south transepts, show greater differentiation of personality and costume ...
    Related: gothic, gothic period, sculpture, german expressionism, first women
  • Greek Grave Steles - 1,742 words
    Greek Grave Steles To us who live in modern times the melancholic look that we find in the sculpture of cemeteries throughout the world is something we take for granted. Although its authenticity has been lost to us, this so-called look can be traced back to 5th century Greek funerary sculpture. For us it is only natural to associate such a look with death. However, as the above verse elaborates, the Greeks viewed death somewhat differently from the way we do. To them death freed their souls and brought true happiness: then why does their grave sculpture look so pensive and thoughtful? It is because unlike today where the dead are only represented figuratively in a sobbing angel or mournful ...
    Related: grave, greek, greek art, greek sculpture, archaic period
  • Greek Grave Steles - 1,724 words
    ... tool used for cleansing the body after exercise), perhaps contemplating its use in his next life in Hades, or perhaps reminiscing the many years it had served him by cleansing his beautiful human body. His name Eupheros is inscribed on the pediment above his head. Eupheros is dressed in a himation (large cloak) and sandals and wears a headband. The folds of his drapery, which pile on his arm and wrap around his body subtly indicating the natural contours of his body. According to Oliver "Eupheros was a victim of the plague that ravaged Athens in 430-427 " however, nothing the stone confirms this. Furthermore, she goes on to say "a desire to commemorate the many victims of the plague may ...
    Related: grave, greek, greek sculpture, before christ, young girl
  • Issues Of Mannerism - 1,777 words
    Issues Of Mannerism Issues of Mannerism The movement in painting that is now referred to as Mannerism began in Italy around 1520, influenced artists throughout Europe, and lasted until the end of the 16th century. The word Mannerism originates from the Italian word maniera which translates into the English word style. The basis of Mannerism then is style; its a period of art where the focus was on grace and beauty. While preceding trends of Renaissance art looked to nature to find their style, working to perfect it, Mannerists manipulated nature creating a gross perfection of human form, idealizing forms to the point of abstraction. Definitions of Mannerist art as well as the reasons for its ...
    Related: mannerism, renaissance art, primary colors, human body, grace
  • Lautzu - 1,216 words
    Lau-Tzu We turn clay to make a vessel; But it is on the space where there is nothing That the utility of the vessel depends. Lao-Tzu 1 When we fill the jug, the pouring that fills it flows into the empty jug. The emptiness, the void, is what does the vessel's holding. The empty space, this nothing of the jug, is what the jug is as the holding vessel. . . . From start to finish the potter takes hold of the impalpable void and brings it forth as the container in the shape of the containing vessel. Martin Heidegger 2 These twenty six ewers by Peter Beasecker are a sustained meditation and inquiry within the medium of their facture on the form of the ewer. This also is a meditation and an inquir ...
    Related: middle english, university press, northwestern university, martin, lecture
  • Matisse - 450 words
    Matisse A special chapter in the history of modern sculpture could be devoted to artists who are known primarily for their careers as painters, but who have also made groundbreaking contributions to the understanding of three-dimensional form. Henri Matisse, celebrated as one of this century's greatest colorists, is also now recognized for the brilliant invention he brought to his sculptural compositions. Born in La Cateau-Cambrsis, in northern France, Matisse first studied law before taking up painting at the age of twenty-one, and in 1891 he enrolled at the Acadmie Julian in Paris. The following year he transferred to the cole des Beaux Arts, where he studied under the great Symbolist pain ...
    Related: henri matisse, matisse, next decade, beaux arts, bronze
  • Michelangelo Was Pessimistic In His Poetry And An Optimist In His Artwork Michelangelos Artwork Consisted Of Paintings And Sc - 1,472 words
    Michelangelo was pessimistic in his poetry and an optimist in his artwork. Michelangelo's artwork consisted of paintings and sculptures that showed humanity in it's natural state. Michelangelo's poetry was pessimistic in his response to Strazzi even though he was complementing him. Michelangelo's sculpture brought out his optimism. Michelangelo was optimistic in completing The Tomb of Pope Julius II and persevered through it's many revisions trying to complete his vision. Sculpture was Michelangelo's main goal and the love of his life. Since his art portrayed both optimism and pessimism, Michelangelo was in touch with his positive and negative sides, showing that he had a great and stable pe ...
    Related: artwork, consisted, michelangelo, michelangelo buonarroti, optimist, pessimistic, poetry
  • Modernism - 2,361 words
    Modernism . Introduction [ ] Print section [ ] Modern Art , painting, sculpture, and other forms of 20th-century art. Although scholars disagree as to precisely when the modern period began, they mostly use the term modern art to refer to art of the 20th century in Europe and the Americas, as well as in other regions under Western influence. The modern period has been a particularly innovative one. Among the 20th century's most important contributions to the history of art are the invention of abstraction (art that does not imitate the appearance of things), the introduction of a wide range of new artistic techniques and materials, and even the redefinition of the boundaries of art itself. T ...
    Related: modernism, human body, virginia woolf, comic strips, psychoanalysis
  • Science And Inventions - 1,110 words
    Science And Inventions Leonardo Da Vinci is one of the greatest and most ingenious men that history has produced. His contributions in the areas of art, science, and humanity are still among the most important that a single man has put forth, definitely making his a life worth knowing. Da Vinci, born on April 15, 1452, is credited with being a master painter, sculptor, architect, musician, engineer, and scientist. He was born an illegitimate child to Catherina, a peasant girl. His father was Ser Piero da Vinci, a public notary for the city of Florence, Italy. For the first four years of his life he lived with his mother in the small village of Vinci, directly outside of the great center of t ...
    Related: science, high renaissance, florence italy, leonardo da vinci, italian
  • 23 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2