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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: scientific theory

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  • Atomic Theory - 1,225 words
    Atomic Theory In ancient Greek the word atom meant the smallest indivisible particle that could be conceived. The atom was thought of as indestructible; in fact, the Greek word for atom means not divisible. Knowledge about the size and make up of the atom grew very slowly as scientific theory progressed. What we know/theorize about the atom now began with a core theory devised by Democrotus, a Greek philosopher who proposed that matter consisted of various types of tiny discrete particles and that the properties of matter were determined by the properties of these particles. This core theory was then modified and altered over years by Dalton, Thompson, Rutherford, Bhor, and Chadwick. The ato ...
    Related: atomic, scientific theory, ernest rutherford, weight loss, justify
  • Charles Darwin And The Development And Impact Of The Theory Of Evolution By Natural And Sexual Selection - 1,768 words
    ... tion of new species. By this chance encounter than, Darwins theory was provided with a rationale, and the how of evolution came to supplement the why. It is important to note, that even though the crux of Darwins theory was inspired by Malthus, Darwin diverged from Malthus in a critical way. Darwins debt to Malthus lies in the borrowing of the concept of the struggle for existence. However, in general, what Malthus was concerned about was not how the struggle for existence affected the quality of the population (i.e., he did not suggest that in the struggle for existence the strong survive and the weak perish) but simply how it limited its numbers. Indeed, Malthus essay was written as a ...
    Related: charles darwin, darwin, evolution, natural rate, natural selection, scientific theory, selection
  • Creation And Evo - 1,642 words
    Creation And Evo Creation vs. Evolution Ever since the publication of Charles Darwin's The Origin of Species was published there has been an ongoing debate between science and religion. Scientists have formulated many theories as to the origins of man and to the creation of the earth, whereas religious groups have one main creation theory, based on the Genesis story of The Bible. These theories, however, are not the cause of the debate because the different theories are simply myths meant to explain the unknown-- the debate is caused by different belief systems. According to a November 1997 Gallup poll 44% of the people that responded agreed that God created human beings in their present for ...
    Related: creation theory, charles darwin, theory of evolution, gallup poll, adopt
  • Creationism - 1,390 words
    Creationism Creationism is a religious metaphysical theory about the origin of the universe. It is not a scientific theory. Technically, creationism is not necessarily connected to any particular religion. It simply requires a belief in a Creator. Millions of Christians and non-Christians believe there is a Creator of the universe and that scientific theories such as the the theory of evolution do not conflict with belief in a Creator. However, fundamentalist Christians such as Ronald Reagan and Jerry Falwell, have co-opted the term 'creationism' and it is now difficult to refer to creationism without being understood as referring to fundamentalist Christians who (a) take the stories in Gene ...
    Related: creationism, natural selection, scientific facts, stephen jay gould, certainty
  • Creationism And Evolution - 1,075 words
    Creationism and Evolution For a long time school administrators, teachers, parents and even students have argued for and against the teaching of either creation and/or evolution. Evolution has been taught in many public schools for generations because of the scientific methods and support it has as a scientific theory of how we as humans came to be. Many religions hold different views of how humanity as we know it was created and these people believe that students should be able to hear their side as well. There is one main problem, the separation of church and state and the limits that are set within this statement. Should creation be taught as theory just like evolution? Do other creation ...
    Related: creationism, evolution, evolution theory, scientific basis, court cases
  • Darwin - 2,435 words
    Darwin From his theories that he claimed were developed during his voyage, Darwin eventually wrote his Origin of Species and Descent of Man, which exploded into the world market over twenty years after his return home. Wallace, King and Sanders wrote in Biosphere, The Realm of Life: In 1859, Charles Darwin published a theory of evolution that implied that humans evolved from apes. . .The Darwinian revolution was the greatest paradigm shift in the history of biology, and it greatly changed the way that ordinary men and women viewed their own place in the world. (1) World Book tells us: (2). . .The study of the specimens from the voyage of the Beagle convinced Darwin that modern species had ev ...
    Related: charles darwin, darwin, origin of species, the bible, diversity
  • Discussion On Classical Conditioning As An Explanation Of Learning - 1,030 words
    Discussion On Classical Conditioning As An Explanation Of Learning We use the term classical conditioning to describe one type of associative learning in which there is no contingency between response and reinforcer. This situation resembles most closely the experiment from Pavlov in the 1920s, where he trained his dogs to associate a bell ring with a food-reward. In such experiments, the subject initially shows weak or no response to a conditioned stimulus (CS, e.g. the bell), but a measurable unconditioned response (UCR, e.g. saliva production) to an unconditioned stimulus (UCS, e.g. food). In the course of the training, the CS is repeatedly presented together with the UCS; eventually the ...
    Related: classical, classical conditioning, conditioning, explanation, cause and effect
  • Distinctive Aspects Of Soviet And Russian - 1,164 words
    DISTINCTIVE ASPECTS OF SOVIET AND RUSSIAN MILITARY THINKING HISTORY 421 This research paper will argue that there are four main areas in which Soviet thinking about war, strategy and defense was, and to a large extent is, distinct from Western thinking. Firstly, Soviet and Western thinking were governed by different aims. While the Soviet aim was messianic, the West was content to defend national interests. Secondly, Russian military thinking is more holistic than Western military thinking. This means that the Russians, unlike many in the West, do not draw sharp lines between different sectors such as the military and civilian components. Thirdly, Russian thinking is based on systematic use ...
    Related: distinctive, russian, soviet, soviet military, soviet union
  • Evolution And Creation - 707 words
    Evolution And Creation Evolution versus creation has been a debate lasting decades upon decades in the United States and around the world. The mock trial held during class, however, was not to prove one view as right and the other wrong. Rather, the focus of the trial, from the view of the prosecution, was simply to prove that creation should not be taught as a science in schools. The prosecution and the defense were each allowed four witnesses. A fifth grade science teacher, a preacher, a world religions professor, and Dawkins were called to the stand by the prosecution. My part in the trial was that of the preacher. Our argument was simple; the preacher believed creation to be true, of cou ...
    Related: evolution, church and state, federal government, separation of church and state, grade
  • Evolution And Creation - 1,400 words
    Evolution And Creation Ever since the publication of Charles Darwin's The Origin of Species was published, there has been an ongoing debate between science and religion. Scientists have formulated many theories as to the origins of man and to the creation of the earth, whereas religious groups have one main creation theory, based on the "Genesis" story of The Bible. These theories, however, are not the cause of the debate because the different theories are simply myths meant to explain the unknown. The debate is caused by different belief systems. The main difference between creationists and scientists is the way they fight this debate. Creationists have developed their own science: Creation ...
    Related: creation theory, evolution, theory of evolution, the bible, king james
  • Falsificationism - 674 words
    Falsificationism There is often a heated debate on whether or not a theory is scientific. This debate brings to light a problem named the demarcation problem. This problem simply asks how one distinguishes between science and non-science. This is a very important question especially in examining separation of church and state. The demarcation problem is apparent when schools are unsure as to whether or not they should teach creationism as a possible scientific theory. Schools are to teach science, but how does one tell the difference between a scientific theory and a theological one. In order to find a solution to the demarcation problem one might look towards falsificationism. Falsification ...
    Related: church and state, separation of church and state, scientific theory, hypotheses, acted
  • God Existence - 1,437 words
    God Existence In David Humes Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion, Cleanthes argument from design is successful in supporting the idea that the universe has an ordered arrangement and pattern. This argument is not sound in its ability to prove the existence of the Christian God. However, Cleanthes does present a sound case for order in the universe, which can be seen as an aspect of ones faith in a Supreme Creator. In the argument from design, Cleanthes is attempting to discover and defend the basic foundations of religion by using the same methods applied in scientific thought. Paramount in the process of scientific thought is reliance on previous observation and experience of certain caus ...
    Related: existence of god, natural religion, falls short, subject matter, relative
  • Greek Roman Godstructures - 2,034 words
    ... ence -- but in a mode that differs fundamentally from ordinary experience. According to Husserl, true positivism does not reduce phenomenon to a physical perspective, but instead places the emphasis on consciousness itself. In his original conception of phenomenology, Husserl's idea of a presuppositionless science amounted to rejecting all antecedent commitments to theories of knowledge, both those formally developed as philosophical systems and those which pervade our ordinary thinking. Identifying any previous knowledge, ideas, or beliefs about phenomenon under investigation, allowed the examiner to be impartial. He intended by this bracketing of scientific or cultural presuppositions ...
    Related: greek, greek / roman, greek roman, roman, edmund husserl
  • Humanism During The Renaissance - 513 words
    Humanism During the Renaissance The Renaissance was an incredibly important turning point in Western Intellectual and Cultural Tradition. All of these changes centered around the idea of Humanism -- in which, people became less "God Centered" and more "Human-centered". I have narrowed down these changes, and will discuss in detail, these changes in three major categories: Political, Education, and the Humanism of Arts. The major pollical changes of the Renaissance were from the old Feudal System of the Middle Ages into a more flexible and liberal class system. This was most noticeable in Italy (particularly in Florence), where the divisions consisted of the old rich, the new rich nobles, the ...
    Related: humanism, renaissance, middle class, scientific theory, count
  • Hume - 2,205 words
    ... n this riposte to Cleanthes: Your theory itself cannot surely pretend to any such advantage; even though you have run into anthropomorphism, the better to preserve a conformity to common experience. Let us once more put it to trial. In all instances which we have ever seen, ideas are copied from real objects, and are ectypal, not archetypal, to express myself in learned terms: You reverse this order, and give thought the precedence. In all instances which we have ever seen, though has no influence upon matter, except that matter is so conjoined with it, as to have an equal reciprocal influence upon it. Cleanthes makes no substantial reply, and Demea the pietist comes to the stage with an ...
    Related: hume, free choice, world view, promised land, remote
  • I Am A Person Who Believes That All People Should Be Treated Fairly I Believe In The Freedom Of Thought, The Freedom Of Relig - 960 words
    I am a person who believes that all people should be treated fairly. I believe in the freedom of thought, the freedom of religion, the freedom of speech, but most of all the freedom to control ones own destiny. During his dictatorship Joseph Stalin stripped his people not only of freedom of thought, religion and speech, but of many other rights as well. Although Joseph Stalin managed to bring about great changes in a very short period of time, I believe that the results were not worth the price paid by his country and its people. Stalins first major policy that he enforced came in the form of a five-year plan. This was created to help build up the industry and economy of Russia. It included ...
    Related: fairly, freedom of religion, freedom of speech, world history, joseph stalin
  • In My Short Life On This Planet I Have Come To Question Things That Many Take Upon Blind Faith We All Know That We Must Some - 1,204 words
    In my short life on this planet I have come to question things that many take upon blind faith. We all know that we must some day die; yet we continuously deny the forces at work inside ourselves, which want to search out the answers of what may or may not come after. It is far easier for humanity to accept that they will go to a safe haven and be rewarded for their lives with pleasures and fantasies of an unfathomable scale than to question the existence of a supposed omnipotent being. Yet, there are a few of us humans who tend to question the why's and wherefore's that society puts forth to us. We question the existence of God, or the creation of mankind rather than blindly accepting faith ...
    Related: blind, planet, big bang theory, scientific facts, confirmation
  • Isaac Newton - 1,240 words
    Isaac Newton Isaac Newton was a well-known English scientist. He accomplished a lot during his time and influenced the world a great deal. He is considered to have contributed more to science than any other person. His life can be divided into three periods. The first one was his early childhood, he second was the time of his accomplishments, and the third is his later life. Isaac Newton was born on December 25, 1642 in Woolsthorpe, Lincolnshire, England. His family was poor and his parents farmed for a living. His father died three months before he was born. His mother later remarried a minister and Newton went to stay with his grandmother. He attended a grammar school at the age of eleven, ...
    Related: isaac, isaac newton, newton, early childhood, the bible
  • Its The End Of The Worldand I Feel Fine - 1,539 words
    It's The End Of The World...And I Feel Fine Elspeth Wilson Politics & Film Final Paper December 15, 2000 It's the End of the World ... and I Feel Fine! (The role of intellectuals in the creation and justification of nuclear weapons.) In Fail Safe and Dr. Strangelove, Or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb, Sidney Lumet and Stanley Kubrick question the relationship between technology and humanity by emphasizing mankind's tendency to create machines that cannot be adequately controlled. By blatantly revealing the absurdity of game theory (Mutual Assured Destruction as a reasonable deterrence for nuclear war), both directors call into question the dominant pro-Cold War American id ...
    Related: nuclear warfare, foreign policy, scientific theory, minimal, surprise
  • John Dalton Was Born In September 5,1766 In Eaglesfield In Cumberland, England Dalton And His Family Lived In A Small Country - 1,479 words
    John Dalton was born in September 5,1766 in Eaglesfield in Cumberland, England. Dalton and his family lived in a small country house. His family had been Quakers since 1690. Quakers where members of a society of friends. John had a brother named Mary and A brother named Charles, when he was born his brother was twelve years old and his sister was two years old. Dalton's birth was not recorded, so when he grew up older he asked one of his relatives and got and answer which was his birthday. His parents were honest people and good workers. His dad Joseph had land he had inherited were Dalton and his brother Charles help out with the crop. His mother Deborah Greenup homespun textile Dalton's si ...
    Related: dalton, john dalton, modern chemistry, scientific theory, smart
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