Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: scientific discovery

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  • Alchemy - 664 words
    Alchemy Alchemy There are many ways to examine the subject of alchemy, including alchemy as a source of symbolism, psychology, and mysticism. It has also been an influence on the world view of various writers, artist, and musicians. The focus of this report is alchemy as a pre-chemistry, which gave a new impulse towards the preparation of medicinal remedies and also was a major influence on today's scientific investigations. Alchemy is an ancient art, practiced in the Middle Ages. The fundamental concept of alchemy stemmed from Aristotle's doctrine that all things tend to reach perfection. Because other metals were thought to be less perfect than gold, it was reasonable to believe that natur ...
    Related: alchemy, modern chemistry, ancient art, modern science, predecessor
  • Challenger - 2,357 words
    ... ere scrutinized. "Mr. OConnor - who flew on the shuttle Atlantis three months before Challenger was destroyed - said his next mission wasnt until 1991." (Price, p1) But there more to the effects than the investigations; there were also many emotional issues that had to be faced. "For the Challenger mission, Robert B. Sieck was Director of shuttle operations at Floridas Kennedy Space Center - a position he still holds. He is also 57, balding and soft spoken. On the wall of his second floor office is a formal portrait of the Challenger Crew, autographed by the seven members. ! There is also a quote from Teddy Roosevelt that he hung after the explosion. It says " the credit belongs to the m ...
    Related: challenger, shuttle challenger, space shuttle, modern physics, stars
  • Cloning Process - 1,220 words
    Cloning Process Cloning, the process of creating a copy of a plant or animal that is genetically identical to the original through asexual means, has sparked some interesting moral and ethical debate. For years, cloning has been used to produce a greater number of a specific type of plant, such as the Macintosh apple trees, which have all been derived from single mutated plant . Now, however, upon the discovery of a method to clone animals, even humans, people are beginning to become aware of the benefits and consequences of cloning, as well as the ethics involved. Cloning has had a fairly long history. In 1952, the first successful cloning experiment took place. Scientists Robert Briggs and ...
    Related: cloning, thomas king, washington post, good idea, unethical
  • Epistemology Plato Vs Aristotle - 1,086 words
    ... uably caused the civil war. If everyone (in the north and the south) held a similar epistemological view (either Platos or Aristotles) then the civil war wouldnt have taken place. It seems possible that this could happen if nobody broke free from his chains to conceive of a new idea. In this case, everyone would hold a view based on Aristotles epistemology, and there would be no conflict. It seems impossible, however, for everyone to hold a view based on a Platonic epistemology. There will always be people who gain in some way from a current situation, or, because of habituation, simply cant break from their chains to see past the shadows. It seems then, that one problem with Platos epis ...
    Related: aristotle, epistemology, plato, america after, human knowledge
  • Extra Sensory Perception - 1,427 words
    Extra Sensory Perception Have you ever had the feeling that youve been in an establishment before youve actually gone inside? Did you ever feel like youve known that something was about to happen before there were any signs that it was about to occur? If youre not a skeptic about the powers of the mind, then there might just be an explanation for your seemingly coincidental premonitions. Its a phenomenon called extra sensory perception, better known as ESP. The textbook definition of this classification of parapsychology is "sensing" anything beyond the normal.(www.paranormalatoz.com) Most scientists do not believe that this phenomenon exists. Nevertheless, controversial evidence can be used ...
    Related: extra, perception, sensory, sensory perception, international edition
  • Hiv - 627 words
    Hiv CURRENT EVENTS: HIVS ROOTS TRACED TO 1930 Summary Scientists have concluded, based on mathematical research, that the virus that lead to the epidemic of AIDS can be traced all the way back to 1930, somewhere around Central Africa. Bette Korber, of the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico, presented this conclusion at the Conference of Retroviruses. The notion that HIV was introduced in contaminated oral polio vaccines in Africa between the years of 1957 and 1961 has been often debated and challenged. The results presented by Korber, not only refute the before mentioned allegations, but also move us toward finding out where the virus really came from and in which direction it is h ...
    Related: caribbean islands, new mexico, national laboratory, institute
  • Human Cloning - 893 words
    Human Cloning Human Cloning ... Most people panic when they hear the words "Human Cloning". Crazy thoughts run through their heads, imaginations run wild. They think of the world being run over by a million little Hitler's. They think of people thinking exactly like one another, and that no person would be different. And for some reason because of cloning, the world, as we know it will cease to exist. Cloning to some people is even considered "evil." Most religious people believe that it is "Playing God", they think that mankind is not supposed to have this power. Cloning, however, is not a magical way of creating life. It is a scientific procedure that will save many lives, cure diseases an ...
    Related: cloning, cloning human cloning, human cloning, cystic fibrosis, tay sachs disease
  • Journey To Center Of The Earth - 668 words
    Journey To Center Of The Earth In the novel, A Journey to the Center of the Earth, author Jules Verne tells the fictitious story of three men and their adventures as they descend into the depths of the earth. The leading character in this expedition is a fifty-year-old German professor named Hardwigg. He is an uncle to the narrator, Henry (Harry), a simple Englishman. The other man is Hans, a serene Icelandic guide. Professor Hardwigg finds a piece of parchment that written in Runic in a book. Harry finds out before his uncle that it says there is a way to get into the center of the earth through a mountain (Mt. Sneffels) in Iceland. Harry is reluctant to tell his uncle the message because h ...
    Related: journey to the center of the earth, human beings, jules verne, the narrator, harry
  • Manhattan Project - 1,922 words
    Manhattan Project Manhattan Project In the early morning hours of July 16, 1945, the first ever nuclear explosion took place in Alamogordo, New Mexico. The explosion was the first test of the most destructive weapon ever known to man, and was the result of almost six years of research and development by some of the world's top scientists. This endeavor was known as the Manhattan Project. Less than a month after the test, which was known as Trinity, the United States dropped two nuclear bombs on Japan, three days apart, which forced the Japanese to surrender. The story of the Manhattan Project is an abysmal subject, as is the effect of the Manhattan Project on international politics, and both ...
    Related: manhattan, manhattan project, military power, harcourt brace, describing
  • Medicine In America - 1,116 words
    Medicine In America James Cassedys Medicine in America, A Short History takes a comprehensive look at medical progress in America from its colonial days to the present time. The book takes on five different themes in discussing medicine. First, it discusses the medical establishment, and how it develops over time. Second, it looks at the alternative to established medicine. Alternatives consist of any kind of medical practice outside the orthodox practice of the time. Third, Cassedy explores the science of medicine, taking time to recognize individuals who make significant discoveries in the field of medicine. The role of government in science is the fourth theme studied by Cassedy. The gove ...
    Related: america, medicine, over time, aids epidemic, rely
  • Peter Mitchell 1920 1992 : Chemiosmotic Hypothesis - 1,149 words
    ... ochrome oxidase involved some fairly heated debates before it finally went to Mrten Wikstrm; and it looks as if the mechanism of ATP synthesis through the F1.F0 ATP-ase is more along the lines envisaged by Paul Boyer than through Peter's earlier proposals. In both these cases, with the benefit of hindsight it looks as if Peter underrated the role of the protein and the subtlety of evolution in designing molecular mechanism. It was part of Peter's charm that, no matter how strongly he held his views, his stance was based on sound principles and experimental results, was always well argued, fair, and devoid of malice. When convinced, he conceded graciously; if his own views prevailed, he w ...
    Related: hypothesis, mitchell, peter, home building, east anglia
  • Science Alchemy Alchemy, Ancient Art Practiced Especially In The Middle Ages, Devoted Chiefly To Discovering A Substance That - 850 words
    Science Alchemy Alchemy, ancient art practiced especially in the Middle Ages, devoted chiefly to discovering a substance that would transmute the more common metals into gold or silver and to finding a means of indefinitely prolonging human life. Although its purposes and techniques were dubious and often illusory, alchemy was in many ways the predecessor of modern science, especially the science of chemistry. The birthplace of alchemy was ancient Egypt, where, in Alexandria, it began to flourish in the Hellenistic period; simultaneously, a school of alchemy was developing in China. The writings of some of the early Greek philosophers might be considered to contain the first chemical theorie ...
    Related: alchemy, ancient art, ancient egypt, devoted, discovering, middle ages, modern science
  • Science Analysis - 1,547 words
    Science Analysis The late 19th and 20th centuries have seen advances in technology and scientific understanding the likes of which have not been seen before in such a short amount of time in known Human history. In the last hundred and fifty years science has advanced so much that one would barely recognize the lifestyle of Humans before all these technological wonders. In fact, if the scientists and thinkers of pre-industrial society had had a glimpse of the technology available to the average early 21st century man they would probably surely think some sort of sorcery was involved and would not believe for one moment that all these technological innovations were based on concepts of the go ...
    Related: modern science, science, scientific theory, industrial society, inquiry
  • The Cicada: Many Things To Many People - 1,704 words
    The Cicada: Many Things To Many People In this century of rapid scientific discovery, there still exist natural phenomena with the power to inspire wonder and mystery. The cicada, an insect known since ancient times, is one such phenomenon. Because scientific knowledge of the cicada contains many gaps, these mysterious insects can still stimulate our imagination or lead us into confusion. At the present time, the cicada is many things to many people: it is a curiosity that should be approached scientifically; it is a source of superstition and dread; it is also little more than an annoying, seasonal inconvenience. The cicada is a stout, black insect about an inch in length. Various species o ...
    Related: life cycle, scientific discovery, life sciences, discourage, cycle
  • The Morality Of Science - 1,063 words
    The Morality Of Science The Morality of Science Lesley Hubbard June 14, 2000 There are two parallel stories in Mary Shelleys Frankenstein, one of attempting to discover the secret of life and the other of forcing nature to open her secrets to man (Neal). This novel can be looked by combining those two stories into a theme of the scientist who seeks to play God and what happens to him in his quest to create life from death. When looking at the book in this regard, the reader discovers the dangers inherent in defying the natural order, (Neal) and the potential consequences of scientific discovery. Victor Frankenstein, fascinated with scientific exploration in the physical world, embarked upon ...
    Related: morality, science, shelleys frankenstein, human life, remedy
  • Thomas Alva Edison - 857 words
    Thomas Alva Edison Thomas Alva Edison was the most famous and prolific inventor of all time. During his life, over 1100 patents were issued to him or his associates; he was known as the wizard of Menlo Park, the town in New Jersey where he set up his first invention factory. Yet he was not really a scientist, having no theory or mathematics, and most of his success came from perfecting the ideas of others or already existing inventions by trial and error. He learned telegraphy on the railway, and his services as a telegrapher were in demand during the Civil War, when he traveled all over the country, incidentally studying electricity. In 1868 came his first invention: a machine to record vot ...
    Related: alva edison, edison, thomas alva edison, thomas edison, electric power
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