Live chat

Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: scientific community

  • 84 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • >>>
  • Albert Einstein - 1,461 words
    Albert Einstein Albert Einstein In the next few pages I will talk about a famous mathematician I decided to choose and write an essay about. I chose probably the most well known mathematician/inventor in the world, his name is Albert Einstein. I chose him because he is the one I know the most about and finding information would not have been as hard. In the next few pages I will tell you about his life as a kid, his life as a mathematician, and his life as an inventor. His name was Albert Einstein. He was born on March 14, 1879 in Ulm, Germany. Before his first birthday, his family had moved to Munich were Albert's father, Hermann Einstein, and uncle set up a small Electro-chemical business. ...
    Related: albert, albert einstein, einstein, world war 1, random house
  • Albert Einsteinman Of Vision - 1,905 words
    Albert Einstein-Man Of Vision Albert Einstein: Man of Vision Albert Einstein, perhaps the greatest mind ever to have walked the face of the earth, was born on March 14, 1879 in Ulm, Germany. As a boy, he hated school, and felt that the regimented and repetitive nature of schooling in Germany at that time had any promise of helping his future. He did not do well in school, mainly because he did not care to learn what was being taught to him. While he seemed to be a bright child, his schoolwork did not interest him, but at the same time the simple compass that his father owned fascinated him. Albert constantly harassed his father and his Uncle Jake with questions concerning how the compass wor ...
    Related: albert, albert einstein, edwin hubble, teaching methods, discovering
  • Aliens - 1,911 words
    Aliens -- Copyright Information -- 1999 SIRS Mandarin, Inc. -- SIRS Researcher Spring 1999 Title: Scientists: UFO Reports May Be Worth Evaluating Author: Michelle Levander Source: San Jose Mercury News (San Jose, CA) Publication Date: June 28, 1998 Page Number(s): n.p. --------------------------- SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS (San Jose, Calif.) June 28, 1998, n.p. (c) 1998, Knight-Ridder Newspapers. Distributed by Knight-Ridder/Tribune Information Services. SCIENTISTS: UFO REPORTS MAY BE WORTH EVALUATING by Michelle Levander Mercury News Staff Writer For more than 50 years, UFO investigators have scoured the skies for signs of alien life--completely snubbed by the scientific community as cranks. Bu ...
    Related: aliens, central intelligence agency, stanford university, staff writer, rockefeller
  • Animal Experimentation - 1,936 words
    ... and adults. The only reason man is able to perform these vital operations is because dogs, who are the closest model to humans for this type of procedure at this time, were used for experimentation. By using the canines for experimentation, they have been able to perfect heart surgery in humans (Wil 65). Another benefit humans have had because of animal experimentation is the treatment of familial hypercholestolemia. It was discovered that Watanabe rabbits have a genetic disorder in which they have dangerously high cholesterol levels. A doctor found this problem on the rabbits' feet, which had yellow "pockets" full of liquid. He soon found out this disorder was similar to the ones in hu ...
    Related: animal experimentation, animal research, animal rights, animal testing, animal welfare, experimentation
  • Astronomers Have Announced That A Large Asteroid On A Trajectory Heading Toward The Vicinity Of Earth Will, In Fact, Pass No - 479 words
    Astronomers have announced that a large asteroid on a trajectory heading toward the vicinity of Earth will, in fact, pass no closer to the planet than about 600,000 miles (about 966,000 kilometers). The announcement brought sighs of relief to the general public and scientific community, both of which had been in a frenzy since an earlier announcement suggested the space rock would pass much closer and possibly collide with the Earth. Such an impact would have catastrophic implications for the planet. Much evidence exists to indicate that ancient bombardment of the Earth by asteroids and comets may have precipitated mass extinctions of dinosaurs and other species. An announcement on March 11 ...
    Related: heading, trajectory, global cooling, general public, announcement
  • Black Holes - 1,073 words
    ... or real, existing ones. The singularity in the this hole is more time-like, while the other is more space-like. With this subtle difference, objects would be able to enter the black whole from regions away from the equator of the event horizon and not be destroyed. The reason it is called a black hole is because any light inside of the singularity would be pulled back by the infinite gravity so that none of it could escape. As a result anything passing beyond the event horizon would dissappear from sight forever, thus making the black hole impossible for humans to see without using technologicalyl advanced instruments for measuring such things like radiation. The second part of the name ...
    Related: black hole, black holes, surrounding area, general theory, oppenheimer
  • Censorship Welcome To The Monkey House - 1,555 words
    ... ad to quit reproducing so much, and the people who understood morals said that society would collapse if people used sex for nothing but pleasure This story is not nearly as pessimistic as some of Vonnegut's other novels, however it isn't optimistic either. The story makes the government and the scientific community the villains of the story for taking away sex. It also makes Billy the Poet a hero for rebelling against the government edict and for spreading his philosophy of pleasure through sexual intercourse. One thing that should be pointed out about this story is that it was originally written for Playboy magazine. One of the ironies of the story was after Billy raped the suicide hos ...
    Related: censorship, monkey, named desire, birth control, bookkeeper
  • Charles Darwin 18091882 - 423 words
    Charles Darwin (1809-1882) From a young age Charles Darwin disliked school and instead he liked observing birds and collecting insects to study. When he was 16 years old, Darwin was sent to a medical school in Scotland, which he found as a waste of time. In 1827, Darwin enrolled in the University of Cambridge, England. He also though that his time was wasted there too, as far as academic studies were concerned. Henslow, a professor of botany in Cambridge and Darwins friend, encouraged Darwin in his studies of natural history. In 1831 Henslow recommended that Darwin be chosen for the position of naturalist on the ship the HMS Beagle. For Darwin, the Beagle was chartered for a five-year mappin ...
    Related: charles darwin, charles lyell, darwin, south america, natural selection
  • Charles Darwin And The Development And Impact Of The Theory Of Evolution By Natural And Sexual Selection - 1,768 words
    ... tion of new species. By this chance encounter than, Darwins theory was provided with a rationale, and the how of evolution came to supplement the why. It is important to note, that even though the crux of Darwins theory was inspired by Malthus, Darwin diverged from Malthus in a critical way. Darwins debt to Malthus lies in the borrowing of the concept of the struggle for existence. However, in general, what Malthus was concerned about was not how the struggle for existence affected the quality of the population (i.e., he did not suggest that in the struggle for existence the strong survive and the weak perish) but simply how it limited its numbers. Indeed, Malthus essay was written as a ...
    Related: charles darwin, darwin, evolution, natural rate, natural selection, scientific theory, selection
  • Cloning - 745 words
    Cloning Introduction: Have you ever wandered what it would be like to have a clone, or what it would be like have a twin? Well in a few years you might be able to clone yourself. Thats if they legalize it in the US I. What is cloning? Cloning is the scientific process of combining the DNA of one organism with the egg of another. Creating a perfect genetically matched lifeform. In other words getting an egg and fertilizing it. Then putting it back in the a surrogate mother. II. Who cloned Dolly? Scottish embryologist named Ian Wilmut cloned a Finn Dorset lamb named Dolly from fully different adult mother cells. A. Education Wilmut was born in Hampton Lucey, England, attended the University of ...
    Related: cloning, animal research, mad cow disease, research corporation, improvement
  • Cloning Benefits - 1,742 words
    Cloning Benefits Cloning Benefits What if while walking down the street you encountered someone who looked exactly like you? Would you stare in amazement or would your heart be filled with fear? At first some people may look upon the idea of cloning with disgust and question themselves if humans should play God while others would be interested and study the many possibilities that cloning offers. This illustrates the path that cloning has taken over the latter part of the twentieth century. At first, when cloning was brought up in conversations, people tended to fearfully think of an army of identical persons marching across the earth in hopes of ruling humans. This and many other absurd not ...
    Related: cloning, human cloning, vitro fertilization, growth hormone, fertilization
  • Cloning Humans - 1,364 words
    Cloning Humans "And the Lord God formed man of the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrilsthe breath of life; and man became a livingsoul . . . and He took one of his ribs, and closed up the flesh instead thereof; and the rib, which the Lord God had taken from man, made He a woman and brought her unto man." -Genesis 2:7 21-22 Human cloning is becoming one of the most controversial topics of our time. With recent technological breakthroughs, whole new fields are opening with amazing possibilities. Despite the great advantages that cloning can offer humanity, there are just as many negative aspects of the technology, which have given way to large anti-cloning groups who are gaining ...
    Related: cloning, human beings, human cloning, human history, human race
  • Copernicus - 581 words
    Copernicus Nicolas Copernicus Nicolas Copernicus 1473-1543 Physics February 8, 2000 Nicolas Copernicus Nicolas Copernicus 1473-1543 Copernicus was born in Poland in 1473, he started his education at Cracow University. There he studied mathematics and optics. From here he went to Italy, where he was appointed as a canon in the cathedral of Frauenburg, where he spent a comfortable academic life studding. Copernicus had some small hobbies while at the cathedral, he painted, and frequently translated Greek poetry into Latin. One other hobby that just wasn't small enough to be called a hobby to most of us was astronomy. He made investigations quietly and alone, without any help. He observed from ...
    Related: copernicus, solar system, universal gravitation, seventeenth century, optics
  • Creationism - 1,390 words
    Creationism Creationism is a religious metaphysical theory about the origin of the universe. It is not a scientific theory. Technically, creationism is not necessarily connected to any particular religion. It simply requires a belief in a Creator. Millions of Christians and non-Christians believe there is a Creator of the universe and that scientific theories such as the the theory of evolution do not conflict with belief in a Creator. However, fundamentalist Christians such as Ronald Reagan and Jerry Falwell, have co-opted the term 'creationism' and it is now difficult to refer to creationism without being understood as referring to fundamentalist Christians who (a) take the stories in Gene ...
    Related: creationism, natural selection, scientific facts, stephen jay gould, certainty
  • Diamond - 1,187 words
    Diamond The unique nature of diamond is heavily dependent upon its composition, crystal structure, and mechanical, thermal, and electromagnetic properties.1 Of those dependencies, composition exacts the most influence over the characteristics. Crystal structure is the repeating pattern of diamonds composition, and each of the properties are the result of molecular interaction which is determined by composition. Therefore, composition is paramount in the determination of the qualities of diamond. Before its discovery, adamantane was known as decaterpene, the name applied by Decker to his tricyclic hydrocarbon. Decker believed that his decaterpene was similar in structure as the diamond lattic ...
    Related: diamond, mass production, natural process, scientific community, proceed
  • Dna Profiling - 1,264 words
    DNA Profiling Genetic engineering has developed and blossomed at a frightening rate in the last decade. Originating as merely an area of interest for scientists, genetic engineering has now become an area of which all people should be somewhat knowledgeable. DNA profiling has many uses, both positive and negative, in our society. Aside from its usefulness in many legal investigations, DNA profiling can be used in the workplace to discriminate against employees whose profiles could pose a financial risk. For example, genetic technology can and has been used to determine the capacity of a person to contract certain diseases, such as sickle-cell anemia, which could cause many employers to hesit ...
    Related: dna profiling, profiling, criminal investigations, federal government, jury
  • Dreams - 1,788 words
    Dreams Someone once said, "Throw your dreams into space like a kite, and you do not know what it will bring back, a new life, a new friend, a new love, a new country" (Nin, The Diaries of Anais). Dreams are the result of subconscious thoughts and desires. The other theory to dreams are random noises in the neurons of the brain without special meaning. Dreams are the mental activity that takes place during sleep. "Usually during REM sleep is when dreams occur" (Oxford University). Normally everyone dreams several times a night...some drugs and alcohol may impair the dream process. The inability to recall dreams is not abnormal though. Dreams are communication of the body, mind, and spirit in ...
    Related: dreams, nobel prize, francis crick, specific purpose, inhibit
  • Drug Testing - 1,438 words
    ... ays Morphine 2 to 4 days Methamphetamine 2 to 4 days Valium 30 days (Bina 124) Today many companies are doing what the FBI has been doing for years, using hair follicle testing as a means of drug screening. Hair follicle testing is a drug testing method that is perhaps, less demeaning, less invasive, and less likely to be tampered with than the well-known urine test. Although, it is more reliable than urine testing it has its problems that need to be addressed. It is necessary for one to understand how hair grows to be able to understand the testing procedure. Hair grows within a small cavity known as the hair follicle. Hair growth occurs when cells divide in the matrix near the bottom o ...
    Related: drug abuse, drug testing, testing, illegal drugs, legal issues
  • England Went Through Dramatic Changes In The 19th Century - 511 words
    England went through dramatic changes in the 19th century. English culture, socio-economic structure and politics where largely influenced by the principles of science. Many social expressions occurred due to these changes. Transformations which categorized this time period could be observed in social institutions; for instance: the switch from popular Evangelicalism to atheism, emergence of feminism and the creation of new political ideologies (Liberalism, Conservatism and Radicalism). These are just a few of the changes that took place. All of this social alteration can be attributed to the importance of science. The English people began to trust more in empiricism and logical thought than ...
    Related: international system, social institutions, animal kingdom, conservatism, competing
  • Ethics Of Embryonic Cloning - 1,341 words
    Ethics of Embryonic Cloning Embryonic Wars The specific objective of this major essay is to clarify and summarise the controversial debate concerning the ethical decency of embryonic cloning for therapeutic purposes. This is the form of cloning that is supposedly beneficial to a barrage of medical applications. We will identify the key opposing ethical perspectives such as those of the justification of embryonic research based on the normative theory of consequentialism. This paper will also probe into the relatively brief history of the debate while gauging the particular stumbling blocks of disagreement which bioethicists have arrived at. The topical aspects of therapeutic cloning will be ...
    Related: cloning, embryonic, embryonic stem, ethics, human cloning
  • 84 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • >>>