Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: scientific american

  • 40 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • Airline Safety - 1,183 words
    Airline Safety Airline Safety Many people travel by airplane all around the world. For some people it is the only way they can get to where they are going. On a daily basis, averages of 28 to 30,000 seats are filled on airplanes (Bear, Stearns Co. URL www.hotelonline.com). At each airport, there are hundreds of arrivals and departures worldwide. Even though airline officials say flying is safe, accidents kill many people because airlines neglect to prevent human error or repair faulty equipment. Sometimes I think the only reason an airplane could crash is if something on the plane were to break. However, most of the time that is not the case. A survey conducted by Boeing found that flight cr ...
    Related: airline, time magazine, internet connection, chicago illinois, faulty
  • Cable Modems: Cable Tv Meets The Internet - 3,910 words
    ... downstream traffic travels through the cable modem's Media Access Control mechanism. The MAC mechanism's functions are fairly complex. The MAC mechanism's main purpose is to implement MAC protocols under the direction of the CMTS. MAC protocols are used to time-share the cable media among the various cable modems in a cable data network. The MAC processes can be implemented in hardware, or a combination of software and hardware. Both the CMTS and the MAC mechanism implement MAC protocols to perform ranging procedures to compensate for cable media delays and line losses. The CMTS also interfaces with the MAC mechanism in each cable modem to assign upstream frequencies and upstream time s ...
    Related: cable, cable modems, internet access, internet connection, internet protocol, internet service, internet usage
  • Cold Water Discovered In The Subtropical Atlantic Was Brought There By A Current Which Had Originated In The Polar Region Tem - 638 words
    Cold water discovered in the subtropical Atlantic was brought there by a current which had originated in the polar region; temperature measurements in the real ocean and computer models show there is a southward outflow of cold deep water from the Arctic throughout the Atlantic. This cold water is replaced by warm surface waters, which gradually give off their heat to the atmosphere as they flow northward towards Europe. This acts as a massive heating system for all the land downwind. The heat released by this system is enormous: it measures around 1015 W, equivalent to the output of a million large power stations. If we compare places in Europe with locations at similar latitudes on the Nor ...
    Related: atlantic, north atlantic, originated, polar, polar region
  • Combinatorial Chemistry - 784 words
    Combinatorial Chemistry And New Drugs The body fights disease by generating antibodies that bind to invading organisms. The body can make different antibodies by shuffling and reshuffling their constituent parts, but it can't make a special antibody each time it is faced with a new pathogen. So it uses only the antibodies that will work best and makes more of them. In the past few years, chemists have begun to follow this method to develop new drugs. Instead of looking for signs of a desired activity and then making modifications to the structure, they generate a large number of related compounds and then screen the collection for the ones that could have medicinal value in a process called ...
    Related: chemistry, flat panel, building blocks, scientific american, mixture
  • Computer Crime - 1,366 words
    ... ses spread from program to program and computer to computer, much as biological viruses spread within individual...members of a society. (Chess, 1997) Diskettes were the primary carriers of viruses in the 1980s. (Computer, 1997) Today, they are e-mail attachments, file transfers and infected software downloads or uploads. Networks can even spread viruses to large numbers of connected PCs rapidly. (Yang, 1998) No one working on a [personal computer] is risk free; more viruses are being spread today than ever before, but more help is being developed as well. Special software is now in stores that will help to prevent any major disasters that viruses can cause. (Miastkowski, 1998) Antivirus ...
    Related: computer crime, computer security, computer viruses, crime, personal computer
  • Computer Crime - 1,361 words
    ... m program to program and computer to computer, "much as biological viruses spread within individual...members of a society." (Chess, 1997) Diskettes were the "primary carriers of viruses in the 1980s." ("Computer," 1997) Today, they are e-mail attachments, file transfers and infected software downloads or uploads. Networks can even spread viruses to large numbers of connected PCs rapidly. (Yang, 1998) No one working on a [personal computer] is risk free; more viruses are being spread today than ever before, but more help is being developed as well. Special software is now in stores that will help to prevent any major disasters that viruses can cause. (Miastkowski, 1998) Antivirus softwar ...
    Related: computer crime, computer security, computer viruses, crime, personal computer
  • Coral Reefs Are Arguably The Worlds Most Beautiful Habitats Coral Reefs Have Been Called The Rainforests Of The Oceans, Becau - 1,293 words
    Coral reefs are arguably the worlds most beautiful habitats. Coral reefs have been called the rainforests of the oceans, because of the rich diversity of life they support. Scientists have not yet finished counting the thousands of different species of plants and animals that use or live in the coral reef. There are three types of coral reefs: fringing reefs, barrier reefs, and atolls. Fringing reefs are located close to shore, separated from land by only shallow water. Barrier reefs lie farther offshore, separated from land by lagoons more than ten meters deep. Atolls, on the other hand, are formed far offshore and they make a ring-shaped reef that close a circular lagoon. Coral reefs are t ...
    Related: arguably, barrier reef, coral, coral reefs, great barrier reef
  • Depression In Women - 763 words
    Depression In Women An article in Scientific American called "Why are so many women depressed", by Ellen Liebenluft, focused on the reason why females are more depressed than males. First, Depression comes with a variety of symptoms. For example, a person suffering from depression may experience sleep disturbances, hopelessness, and feeling of worthlessness, difficulty concentrating, experience fatigue and sometime even delusions. Depression is very common among women. If affects nearly 20 percent of women worldwide. Now we have to focus on the reasons that would factor to Depression. Researchers may say that the women have suffered a form of Physical, sexual abuse, harassment or discriminat ...
    Related: men and women, women today, immune system, family history, fatigue
  • Diabetes And Types - 1,641 words
    Diabetes And Types Diabetes Diabetes is little or no ability to move glucose out of the blood into the red blood cells. Nearly 16 million people have diabetes in the United States, which narrows it down to about 1 out of every seventeen people. About 2,150 new cases are diagnosed each day. Many of us do not clearly know what diabetes is and the different categories that it is classified in. The first type of diabetes that will be discussed is type 1 diabetes and steps that can be taken to diagnose diabetes. The second type of diabetes that will be talked about will be type 2 diabetes and how it effects patients. The third type of diabetes is gestational diabetes and how exercise can help con ...
    Related: dependent diabetes, diabetes, diabetes mellitus, diabetes type, gestational diabetes, insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, type 1 diabetes
  • Dna Profiling - 1,211 words
    ... the fundamental principle of the insurance business is "pooling uncertainty." The concept of adverse selection also causes insurers much dismay. Adverse selection refers to the probability that people privately aware of a medical problem are more likely to seek medical insurance. This negates the insurers policy of setting premiums with accordance to statistical information on the rates of illnesses and sicknesses in society. "The whole foundation of insurance is based on the fact that we and the insurance applicant are operating with equal levels of knowledge and ignorance." Without this level of ignorance, insurance companies will lose their social value as a means of spreading risk a ...
    Related: dna profiling, profiling, genetic screening, statistical information, adverse
  • Drug Testin In The Workplace - 1,397 words
    ... on or probable cause can also lead to the absence of Equal protection under the law, the Fourteenth Amendment (Holtorf, 135). The Fourteenth Amendment was cited as protection against selection of a group of athletes for testing by the National Collegiate Athletic Association without demonstrating a likelihood that drug use was prevalent in that population (Holtorf, 136). Drug tests today are considerably weak. Mistakes and errors swarm the vast business of drug testing. Clinical laboratories are not experienced with the special requirements for specimen collection, analysis, storage, documentation, transport, and handling (McBay, 33B). Often times, simple mistakes such as mislabeling or ...
    Related: drug abuse, drug administration, drug test, drug testing, drug treatment, food and drug administration, illicit drug
  • Drug Testing - 1,395 words
    ... obable cause can also lead to the absence of Equal protection under the law, the Fourteenth Amendment (Holtorf, 135). "The Fourteenth Amendment was cited as protection against selection of a group of athletes for testing by the National Collegiate Athletic Association without demonstrating a likelihood that drug use was prevalent in that population" (Holtorf, 136). Drug tests today are considerably weak. Mistakes and errors swarm the vast business of drug testing. "Clinical laboratories are not experienced with the special requirements for specimen collection, analysis, storage, documentation, transport, and handling" (McBay, 33B). Often times, simple mistakes such as mislabeling or repo ...
    Related: drug abuse, drug administration, drug test, drug testing, drug treatment, food and drug administration, illicit drug
  • Ebola: A Harbinger Of The End Of The World - 1,458 words
    Ebola: A Harbinger Of The End Of The World English Honors Rewrite #2 Ebola: A Harbinger of the End of the World? Several years ago, a virus which originated in Africa swept the entire world killing millions. This virus is the commonly known HIV virus, the virus which causes the fatal AIDS disease. In the 1950's after virologists began the classification of viruses, isolated cases of what are called hot viruses began springing up around the world. Most of the deadly viruses were hemorrhagic fever viruses. Some different forms of hemorrhagic viruses are Hantaviruses, Arenaviruses, Flaviviruses, Bunyaviruses, and one of the most dangerous types of viruses, the filovirus. If one of these viruses ...
    Related: world population, most dangerous, hemorrhagic fever, yellow fever, outbreak
  • Ethics Of Animal Testing - 1,763 words
    Ethics Of Animal Testing This theme song to a popular cartoon is a farce dealing with experiments carried out on animals. In the cartoon one mouse is made very smart and wants to take over the world while the other is clearly not as smart. While the cartoon makes jokes, the reality is that mice and other animals re being used for medical tests every day. For some people this testing brings up ethical questions. One of the biggest questions: is it really necessary to take the lives of animals in the name of science and for the betterment of humanity? For animal rights activists, like People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), the answer is no. PETA pressures labs into halting experim ...
    Related: animal experimentation, animal liberation, animal research, animal rights, animal rights movement, animal testing, animal welfare
  • Exxon Valdez - 1,687 words
    Exxon Valdez On March 24, 1989 at 4 minutes past midnight, the oil tanker ExxonValdez struck a reef in Alaska's breath-taking Prince William Sound. Instantaneously, the quiet waters of the sound became a sea of black. "We've fetched up - ah - hard aground north of Goose Island off Bligh Reef, and - ah - evidently leaking some oil," Joseph Hazelwood, captain of the ship, radioed the Coast Guard Marine Safety Office back in Valdez. That "some oil" turned out to be a total of 11,000,000 gallons of crude oil leaking from the ruptured hull of the ship. By the time a containment effort was put forth, a weather storm had helped to spread the oil as much as three feet thick across 1,400 miles of bea ...
    Related: exxon, exxon valdez, exxon valdez oil spill, valdez, christian science
  • Exxon Valdez - 1,688 words
    Exxon Valdez INTRODUCTION On March 24, 1989 at 4 minutes past midnight, the oil tanker ExxonValdez struck a reef in Alaska's breath-taking Prince William Sound. Instantaneously, the quiet waters of the sound became a sea of black. We've fetched up - ah - hard aground north of Goose Island off Bligh Reef, and - ah - evidently leaking some oil, Joseph Hazelwood, captain of the ship, radioed the Coast Guard Marine Safety Office back in Valdez. That some oil turned out to be a total of 11,000,000 gallons of crude oil leaking from the ruptured hull of the ship. By the time a containment effort was put forth, a weather storm had helped to spread the oil as much as three feet thick across 1,400 mil ...
    Related: exxon, exxon valdez, exxon valdez oil spill, valdez, state parks
  • History Of Weed - 1,621 words
    ... As medicine progressed after 1903, marijuana's use declined, but its therapeutic value remained unchallenged, and doctors continued to prescribe it. Early recreational use of marijuana in the United States. A number of colorful references to the recreational use of marijuana and hashish in the nineteenth century are available. Lush descriptions of their personal experiences were published by Baudelaire, Gautier, Dumas Pere, and other members of a Parisian institution, the Club des Hachichins, where strong forms of marijuana were eaten. In December 1856 a young American, Fitz Hugh Ludlow, of Poughkeepsie, New York, published an account of his own marijuana-eating experiences in Putnam's ...
    Related: history, weed, east indies, dining room, absolute
  • Homosexuality - 1,260 words
    ... enes are arranged along 46 chromosomes and each chromosome contains tiny coils of DNA, deoxyribonucleic acid, which carries the instruction to manufacture a particular body substance. There was no such similar sharing in the same region among heterosexual men. Researchers have not yet compared the homosexuals genetic information to the other group. The finding does not explain all the homosexuals; seven out of forty homosexual brothers did not have the common genetic factor. The explanation for this is it might cause by other unknown genetic influence. (LeVay/Hamer, 27-29). Since the DNA strand is long enough to contain hundreds of genes. Hamers team has not found the gene that makes som ...
    Related: homosexuality, hate crime, genetic research, work cited, clustering
  • Is There Another Earth Out There - 1,049 words
    Is There Another Earth Out There? Is There Another Earth Out There? (adopted from an article by Guillermo Gonzalez, Donald Brownlee and Peter D. Ward, Refugees for Life in a Hostile Universe, Scientific American, October 2001) Is there life on other planets? Science has been trying to answer this question for a long time. In the article, the authors argue that it is highly improbable that complex life forms exist in our galaxy. To quote the authors: "Researchers are now casting a skeptical eye on musings about the prevalence of intelligent life throughout the Milky Way". Furthermore, according to the article, not only may most of the solar system be unfriendly to multi-cellular or complex or ...
    Related: ozone layer, building blocks, solar system, planet, casting
  • Lung Cancer - 796 words
    Lung Cancer "Lung cancer is an uncontrolled, extremely deadly division of cells in the lung" (World Book, "Lung Cancer"). The two major types of lung cancer include small and non-small cell. Many different risk factors contribute to lung cancer. There are numerous symptoms that are difficult to detect in the early stages of lung cancer. Doctors use special machines to detect the severity of each stage. Treatments and cures differ in each individual case. Lung cancer is a huge problem because it is the leading cause of cancer death in both men and women (Microsoft, "Lung Cancer"). Both small cell and non-small cell lung cancer affect different types of cells in the lung and spread in differen ...
    Related: american lung, cancer, cancer treatment, lung, lung cancer
  • 40 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2