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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: schizophrenia

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  • Catatonic Schizophrenia - 512 words
    Catatonic Schizophrenia Catatonic Schizophrenia The most uncommon subtype of schizophrenia is catatonia. Although this kind of mental disorder is the rarest of the schizophrenias, it is perhaps the most disturbing to the people inflicted with the illness, and also to the families and friends who encounter the devastating disorder. Whereas paranoid and unorganized schizophrenia are disorders that effect mainly thought and speech behavior, catatonic schizophrenia not only disables speech and thought processes, but it is also a physically disabling illness. Catatonic schizophrenics experience many of the same symptoms as the other types, especially loosely attached thought and speech patterns a ...
    Related: schizophrenia, mental disorder, physical activity, devastating, involving
  • Childhood Schizophrenia - 855 words
    Childhood Schizophrenia Attention can be defined as the concentrated direction of the mind. We can also improve and develop it in our struggle to grasp the best possible understanding of the world around us so as to exploit it to our best interest. Without the aptitude of attention the amount of information available in the environment would be infinite. For example when someone is faced with a life-threatening situation one needs to be economical in dealing with the information arriving at his/her senses. Even in normal circumstances our environment is a buzz of chaos, and we need to select from many different events those to which we should attend in any given moment. Selective attention p ...
    Related: schizophrenia, second language, information available, limit, filter
  • Discuss Socialpsychological Explanations Given For Schizophrenia - 1,560 words
    Discuss Social/Psychological Explanations Given For Schizophrenia Page 255 Question 4 (a) and (b) DESCRIBE ANY ONE MENTAL DISORDER. DISCUSS SOCIAL/PSYCHOLOGICAL EXPLANATIONS GIVEN FOR THIS DISORDER. SCHIZOPHRENIA Schizophrenia is a serious psychotic disorder that is characterised by a loss of contact with reality. Kraepelin in 1902 originally called schizophrenia Dementia Praecox which is a senility of youth. He believed that the typical symptoms were due to a form of mental deterioration which began in adolescence. Symptoms are mainly disturbances of thought processes but also extend to disturbances of behaviour and emotion. There are two traditional symptom categories of schizophrenia. Acu ...
    Related: paranoid schizophrenia, psychological explanations, schizophrenia, medical research, general public
  • Schizophrenia - 651 words
    Schizophrenia In a quiet, darkened hospital room a twenty five year old man with paranoid schizophrenia lies on a table. His eyes are closed. He is listening to the voice that has plagued him for more than two years. The voice is relentless, speaking once every ten seconds or so. Don't act stupid, it says in a demanding tone. Dirty rotten bastard. This serious mental condition includes delusions, hallucinations, disorientation, and thinking disorders. Schizophrenia can be traced back to a persons genetics, and can have devastating effects. This is one of the many problems that a schizophrenic person has to deal with daily. Some symptoms include visual and auditory hallucinations. Paranoia ma ...
    Related: paranoid schizophrenia, schizophrenia, mental illness, mental health, auditory
  • Schizophrenia - 1,604 words
    Schizophrenia Schizophrenia is a mental illness, characterized by a range of symptoms. Most common symptoms include delusions and hallucinations. Additional symptoms of schizophrenia found in humans include: bizarre behavior, loss of contact with reality, disorganized thinking and speaking, decreased emotional expressiveness, social withdrawal and memory loss. When a person smiles at another person, the usual response is to smile back. When a schizophrenic person sees one`s smile, he/she wonders, Why are they laughing at me? Schizophrenics think that everyone is against them, causing everything to be rarely funny. Unlike other mental illnesses, schizophrenia has a fading effect on the person ...
    Related: schizophrenia, raising children, early adulthood, happy life, autonomy
  • Schizophrenia - 492 words
    Schizophrenia Schizophrenia is a severe mental illness characterized by a variety of symptoms, including loss of contact with reality, bizarre behavior, disorganized thinking and speech, decreased emotional expressiveness, and social withdrawal. Usually only some of these symptoms occur in any one person. The term schizophrenia comes from Greek words meaning "split mind." However, contrary to common belief, schizophrenia does not refer to a person with a split personality or multiple personality.To observers, schizophrenia may seem like madness or insanity. Perhaps more than any other mental illness, schizophrenia has a debilitating effect on the lives of the people who suffer from it. A per ...
    Related: schizophrenia, social services, health professionals, mental health, inappropriate
  • Schizophrenia - 1,459 words
    Schizophrenia Schizophrenia is a debilitating mental disorder characterized by a dysfunctional thinking process and withdrawal from the outside world. The word schizophrenia comes from two Greek words schizo which means split and phrenia, which means mind. This doesnt mean that a person with the disorder has multiple personalities, but rather parts of the mind seem to be operating independent of each other. The disease affects approximately 1 in 100 people and there are thought to be over 2 million schizophrenics in the United States today. Schizophrenia has been found to be a biologically based brain disease due to the imbalance of two of the brains chemicals dopamine and serotonin. In the ...
    Related: paranoid schizophrenia, schizophrenia, mental health, national institute, sleeping
  • Schizophrenia - 460 words
    Schizophrenia My Proposal Schizophrenia is a disastrous mental illness present in 1% of the worlds population. Doctors are still unsure of the causes of schizophrenia, and no medical cure has been discovered for this illness. Physicians have developed medical treatments, although the problem is getting the patient to stay on the medication, which contains many side affects. Many alternative medications have been tested for instance marijuana is believed to help schizophrenics battle their illness. Schizophrenics should be admitted to hospitals where doctors can be positive they are correctly diagnosed, and make sure theyre not dangerous, and can survive in society. Schizophrenia is probably ...
    Related: schizophrenia, point of view, real world, problems caused, schizophrenic
  • Schizophrenia - 248 words
    Schizophrenia Schizophrenia is a group of psychotic disorders characterized by disturbances in thought, perception, affect, behavior, and communication that last longer than 6 months. There are 5 recognized types of schizophrenia: catatonic, paranoid, disorganized, undifferentiated, and residual. Schizophrenia is thought to affect about 1% of the population. The symptoms of schizophrenia are present during the active phase. Delusions, hallucinations, catatonic behavior, and incoherence are some of the basic symptoms. No single characteristic is present in all types of schizophrenia. The cause of schizophrenia is unknown. There are various theories to explain the development of this disorder. ...
    Related: schizophrenia, drug treatment, family history, social factors, disorganized
  • Schizophrenia And Frankenstein - 1,193 words
    Schizophrenia And Frankenstein In a psychoanalytic view of Mary Shelleys Frankenstein, Robert Walton develops, during a dreadfully severe trip through the Arctic, a type of schizophrenia; this mental condition enables him to create a seemingly physical being representing each his superego and his id (9). In his mind, Walton creates Victor as his very own superego and the monster as his id. The superego and the id battle throughout the story to produce the final result: Walton, the ego. Many of the qualities Walton develops during his trip are symptoms of schizophrenia. His letters exude an aura of depression, loneliness, In his second letter, Walton emphasizes an obsession with his aspiratio ...
    Related: frankenstein, schizophrenia, shelleys frankenstein, guilford press, robert walton
  • Schizophrenia Is A Serious Brain Disorder It Is A Disease That Makes It Difficult For A Person To Tell The Difference Between - 1,128 words
    Schizophrenia is a serious brain disorder. It is a disease that makes it difficult for a person to tell the difference between real and unreal experiences, to think logically, to have normal emotional responses to other, and to behave normally in social situations. People with schizophrenia may also have difficulty in remembering, talking, and behaving appropriately. Schizophrenia is one of the most common mental illnesses. About 1% of the world population has schizophrenia. In the United States, there are about 2.5 million people with the disease. Schizophrenia is the cause of more hospitalizations than almost any other illness. Schizophrenia most commonly begins between the ages of 15 and ...
    Related: brain, chronic disease, disorder, schizophrenia, best choice
  • Schizophrenia: Theories - 1,377 words
    Schizophrenia: Theories John Psychology Schizophrenia: Theories Schizophrenia is a mental disorder characterized by the loss of contact with reality. When a person's thinking, feeling, and behavior is so far from normal as to interfere with his or her ability to function in everyday life. When delusions, hallucinations, irregular thinking or emotions are produced, then he or she has a mental illness called schizophrenia. About one hundred years ago schizophrenia was first recognized as a mental disorder and researchers have been searching for a cure since. The exact cause of schizophrenia is still unknown and scientists are certain that schizophrenia has more than one cause. Scientists have ...
    Related: social theory, mental disorder, contributing factor, mixed, stimulation
  • Boooooooring Exclaimed Marisa Bored Witless During A Mathematics Lesson, Whilst She Threw Her Feet On The Desk Ta - 893 words
    "Boooooooring!" exclaimed Marisa bored witless during a mathematics lesson, whilst she threw her feet on the desk. "Take your feet off the desk this instant young lady!" shouted the hysterical Ms. Daemon as she had a swig of her "coffee". "Why should I?" asked the arrogant Marisa, tossing her hair off her shoulder with a sly smile. "Warning one, if you get a second warning you're in the focus room!" Ms. Daemon was ready to cut Marisa's throat out with a key, but was previously suspended for her cruel acts of "discipline" so she had to patiently wait for Marisa to make one more mistake, in order for her to fully inflict the mental torture she was all to well acquainted with. Ms. Daemon was a ...
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  • The Effects Of Color On Personality And Relationships - 1,051 words
    ... nditioned to gold over a period of time. Gold strengthens all fields of the body and spirit. Black: is a color that is not used very often but it will help bring a patient to a state of grace. It will help them reach the silence and the peace of God. For example, women are more aware of color and prefer red to blue while men prefer blue to red. Elderly people have a significant preference for light colors over darker ones. People with schizophrenia tend to prefer neutral colors such as white, black, brown, and gray. People with bipolar disorder and mentally healthy individuals tend to prefer chromatic hues such as red, yellow, green and blue. Red and yellow aren't the only warm colors; n ...
    Related: human personality, personality, relationships, medical profession, bipolar disorder
  • Abnormal Psychology - 1,197 words
    Abnormal Psychology In a world full of fears, perhaps the worst one a human being should haveis that to be afraid of his fellow man. The human that should be mostfeared is the one that has Anti-Social Personality Disorder or in laymensterms the psychopath. The psychopath is probably the most deviant mindthat exists and treatment is not very successful because there is not a cureor drug to control it. The solution in my mind to control the problem ofsociopaths is to let them live in colonies with each other. Through myresearch I will develop an understanding of this personality disorder andconvince you the reader that my solution might be a viable solution. Thesociopath is a combination of ot ...
    Related: abnormal, abnormal psychology, psychology, hyperactivity disorder, violent behavior
  • Alfred Hitchcock - 1,409 words
    ALFRED HITCHCOCK He was known to his audiences as the 'Master of Suspense' and what Hitchcock mastered was not only the art of making films but also the task of taming his own imagination. Director of many works such as Vertigo, Psycho, The Birds and The 39 steps, Hitchcock told his stories through intelligent plots, witty dialogue and tales of mystery and murder. In doing so, he inspired a new generation of film makers and revolutionized the thriller film, making him a legend around the world. His brilliance was sometimes too bright: He was hated as well as loved. Hitchcock was unusual, inventive, impassioned, yet demanding. Alfred Joseph Hitchcock was born on August 13, 1899(Sennet 108). H ...
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  • Amphetaminesmethamphetamines - 772 words
    Amphetamines/Methamphetamines Matchmaker.com: Sign up now for a free trial. Date Smarter! Amphetamines/Methamphetamines The medical use of amphetamines was common in the 1950/60's when they were used to help cure depression and to help the user lose weight. An amphetamine is a drug that is a stimulant to the central nervous system. Amphetamines are colorless and may be inhaled, injected, or swallowed. Amphetamines are also used non-medically to avoid sleep, improve athletic performance, or to counter the effects of depressant drugs. Amphetamines are addictive. Because of this, when the user discontinues use or reduces the amount that they use, withdrawal symptoms may occur. Some withdrawal s ...
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  • Analytical Chemistry - 1,249 words
    Analytical Chemistry Nanothinc - providing information services concerning nanotechnology and related enabling technologies, which include supramolecular chemistry, protein engineering, molecular design and modelling software Oxford Molecular Group PLC - A leading developer and marketer of computer-aided chemistry and bioinformatics software. Mac Education Software: Chemistry Math Latin Greek French Spanish Prode - Data on software, computers, chemical engineering, chemistry Trinity Software - programs for chemistry, life science, and speech and communication. Program titles include curriculum supplements and research tools for both PC and MAC computers. New Technology Collaborative, Inc - e ...
    Related: analytical, analytical chemistry, chemistry, inorganic chemistry, intellectual property
  • Anorexia Nervosa - 1,685 words
    Anorexia Nervosa Eating disorders are a cause for serious concern from both a psychological and a nutritional point of view. They are often a complex expression of underlying problems with identity and self concept. These disorders often stem from traumatic experiences and are influenced by society`s attitudes toward beauty and worth (Eating Disorder Resource Center, 1997). Biological factors, family issues, and psychological make-up may be what people who develop eating disorders are responding to. Anyone can be affected by eating disorders, regardless of their socioeconomic background (Eating Disorder Resource Center, 1997). Anorexia nervosa is one such disorder characterized by extreme we ...
    Related: anorexia, anorexia nervosa, nervosa, body image, serious concern
  • Antisocial Personality Disorder - 1,191 words
    ... mistreated or stolen from others; * must be older than 18 to be diagnosed with it * must be evidence of a conduct disorder before the age of 15 * antisocial behavior doesn't occur only during the course of schizophrenia or manic episodes of bipolar illness Anti-Social Personality Disorder is found in as much as 75% of the prison population. Alcohol is a contributing cause or consequence of being antisocial. People that are both antisocial and alcoholic are prone to violent behavior. Not every antisocial becomes a criminal. An antisocial person's disorder peaks between the ages of 24 and 44 and drops off sharply after that. After the age of 30 the sociopath fights less and performs less c ...
    Related: anti-social personality disorder, antisocial, antisocial behavior, antisocial personality disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, conduct disorder, disorder
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