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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: sacrifice

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  • In Democratic Ages Men Rarely Sacrifice Themselves For Another, But They Show A General Compassion For All The Human Race One - 1,080 words
    In democratic ages men rarely sacrifice themselves for another, but they show a general compassion for all the human race. One never sees them inflict pointless suffering, and they are glad to relieve the sorrows of others when they can do so without much trouble to themselves. They are not disinterested, but they are gentle. - Alexis De Tocqueville (www.cybernation.com) Compassion is an innate quality that is found within human nature, and is expressed to those in the form of a helping hand to people who are financially and emotionally troubled. However, each individual may have a different limit towards the amount of compassion that one can show to another being. In Herman Melvilles story, ...
    Related: compassion, human nature, human race, rarely, sacrifice
  • In Democratic Ages Men Rarely Sacrifice Themselves For Another, But They Show A General Compassion For All The Human Race One - 1,110 words
    ... and thus cannot help overcome Bartlebys problems. He says, "what I saw that morning persuaded me that the scrivener [,Bartleby,] was the victim of innate and incurable disorder. I might give alms to his body; but his body did not pain him; it was his soul that suffered, and his soul I could not reach" (2342). Thus, the narrator has given up trying to understand Bartleby, which in effect leads to Bartlebys death. When the narrator concludes that he could not connect to Bartleby, it seems he has reached the limit of his compassion towards Bartleby. He devises a plan to get rid of Bartleby, rationalizing that he is helping the scrivener, when in truth he is bribing him. He says, "I told Bar ...
    Related: compassion, human race, rarely, sacrifice, american literature
  • Sacrifice Within The Israelite Religion - 1,861 words
    Sacrifice Within The Israelite Religion The primary religious rituals of Israelite religion involved sacrifices and offerings. The ritual system within the Israelite cult evolved around gifts and offerings that were presented before Yahweh. In examining the book of Leviticus, the sacrificial system of the Israelites can be identified. It is this sacrificial system that was handed down by God through Moses that allowed the people of Israel to cross over the gap between their own weaknesses and corruption to the expectations presented by God. Sacrifices symbolized an acknowledgement of guilt and a need for divine grace and forgiveness. Understanding the Israelite Cult The Israelite cult is set ...
    Related: israelite, religion, sacrifice, divine grace, everyday life
  • Unnecessary Sacrifice - 204 words
    Unnecessary Sacrifice Just as we wonder how past civilizations could be so barbaric as to practice sacrifice, future generations may wonder how our society could be so barbaric as to sacrifice even the unborn. Thus abortion should not be made legal. Because it is not determined when the fetus inside the mothers womb becomes an actual human being, it cannot be determined when abortion actually becomes murder. Until it can be determined when the fetus becomes an infant it should be considered murder at any point during pregnancy termination. Why do the largest percentage of abortions occur? Because childern are irresponsible. Stupid, little, baby, girls start fooling around and OOPS... they en ...
    Related: sacrifice, unnecessary, abortion, america
  • 1984 And Brave New World - 1,196 words
    ... hidden beneath the dark mustache. O cruel, needless misunderstanding! O stubborn, self-willed exile from the loving breast! Two gin-scented tears trickled down the sides of his nose. But it was all right, everything was all right, the struggle was finished. He had won the victory over himself. He loved Big Brother. This shows the power that the Party and OBrien has had over Winston; they have taken his old understanding and beliefs and transformed them into an attitude that complies with those of the Party. The conditioning of an individual for a utopian society often results in the repression of individuality. Both novels attempt to create a utopian society. The major thing that holds t ...
    Related: 1984, brave, brave new world, utopian society, breast feeding
  • 1984 And Today - 660 words
    1984 and Today In George Orwells 1984, Winston Smith feels frustrated by the oppression and rigid control of the ruling Party of London, which prohibits free thought, sex, and any expression of individuality. The people of his nation, Oceania, are watched every minute of every day by Big Brother, an omniscient leader who can only be seen on telescreens, but never in real life. Winston illegally purchases a diary in which to write his criminal thoughts, and becomes fixated on a powerful Party member named OBrien, whom Winston believes is a secret member of the Brotherhood, the legendary group that works to overthrow the party. He also begins a covert affair with Julia, a co-worker, which is o ...
    Related: 1984, real life, big brother, george orwell, emmanuel
  • 3 Non Traditional Religions Voodoo, Spiritualism, Cults - 2,024 words
    3 Non Traditional Religions Voodoo, Spiritualism, Cults Religion is primary agent of social control in our society. Due to its communally held beliefs and principles, we have a foundation on which we can rest the laws, values, and the main doctrine, of almost any society. Here in America, we have tremendous freedom in both establishing and in choosing the religion of our choice. This freedom has given birth to many non-traditional religions and practices. When discussing the topic of social control and order within a society, these non-traditional religions can be used very strongly to bring about social change within an individual then into the population. On the rise in our nation, is the ...
    Related: catholic religion, west indies, social change, catholic church, music
  • A Bet Against Internet Gambling - 1,187 words
    A Bet Against Internet Gambling 07 February 2001 A Bet against Internet Gambling I love gambling. Who doesn't? The minute you walk into a casino you are overwhelmed by exciting noises, flashing lights and people having a good time. There is so much excitement it isn't hard to become addicted, especially after your first big win. The rush you get from winning is something that is hard to parallel. Trust me I know. I almost became addicted. I realized the trouble I was heading for before it was too late. I was a lucky one. Many people aren't as lucky. It is especially easy for people who live very close to a casino to get addicted because it is so easily accessible. Now imagine if everyone who ...
    Related: gambling, gambling impact study commission, internet gambling, internet sites, online gambling
  • A Brave New World - 976 words
    A Brave New World A Personal Utopia: An Analysis of a Key Passage in Brave New World The key passage of Aldous Huxleys Brace New World takes place after John has been arrested and is a conversation with Mond. When John and Mond speak of ideal societies, a major part of Brave New World, the aspect of human nature which makes us search continuously for our personal Utopia, becomes apparent. In Monds study, the sacrifices each character makes in order to find a Utopia are interconnected. The search for a personal Utopia reveals Huxleys view on human nature of sacrificing everything to live with self-fulfillment. The connection of the sacrifices each character makes is shown in the study, helpin ...
    Related: brave, brave new world, ideal society, book reports, intelligence
  • A Brave New World Aldous Huxley 81932, 1946 Aldous Huxley Harpercollins Publishers Ltd Ny,ny 10022 - 1,168 words
    A Brave New World. Aldous Huxley. 81932, 1946 Aldous Huxley. HarperCollins Publishers Ltd. NY,NY. 10022 . P 1 AA squat grey building of only thirty-four stories. Over the main entrance the words, CENTRAL LONDON HATCHERY AND CONDITIONING CENTRE, and, in a shield, the World State=s motto, COMMUNITY, IDENTITY, STABILITY.@ Here is a document I found on the web which helped me (embedded as an OLE object) : P 13 ANothing like oxygen-shortage for keeping an embryo below par.@ AThe lower the caste . . . the shorter the oxygen.@ P 19 AThey hurried out of the room and returned in a minute or two, each pushing a kind of tall dumb-waiter laden, on all its four wire-netted shelves, with eight-month-old b ...
    Related: aldous, aldous huxley, brave, brave new world, huxley, world aldous huxley, world state
  • A Comparison Of Judaism, Islam, Christianity - 1,589 words
    ... from their homes. Much persecution of Jews by Christians has been justified by the belief that the Jews were responsible for the death of Christ. In Nazi Germany and after the fall of the Third Reich, many Germans said that even though what happened to the Jews of Europe during World War Two was horrible, they did bring it on themselves because they were responsible for the death of Jesus. The Christian/Muslim conflicts began during the seventh century CE, with the fall of the Byzantine cities in Egypt and the Holy Land within ten years of the death of Muhammad. "Europeans watched in horror as the Holy Lands became Muslim and the "infidel" advanced into Spain" (Fisher, p.382). This Euro ...
    Related: christianity, comparison, great western, human beings, dependence
  • A Doll House - 1,407 words
    A Doll House Nora Perceived by Other Characters In the Victorian age many woman were thought of as mere objects. Most woman has no real social status and were not allowed to express themselves freely. A Dolls House, a play by Henrik Ibsen, has brought controversy to the conclusion in which Nora leaves her family. Nora perceived in many different ways is the catalyst that forces Nora to leave her family. Many people had found it difficult to understand how Nora could dessert her husband and children. In the Victorian Age it was not only unheard of to walk out on your loved ones but unethical as well. There are many incidents that inch by inch helps Nora come to the conclusion that she must le ...
    Related: doll, doll house, dolls house, real world, different ways
  • A Dolls House - 855 words
    A Doll's House Becoming Independent Throughout A Dolls House, Henrik Ibsen illustrates through an intriguing story how a once infantile-like woman gains independence and a life of her own. Ibsen creates a naturalistic drama that demonstrates how on the outside Nora and Torvald seam to have it all, but in reality their life together is empty. Instead of meaningful discussions, Torvald uses degrading pet names and meaningless talk to relate to Nora. Continuing to treat Nora like a pampered yet unimportant pet, Torvald thoroughly demonstrates how men of his era treat women as insignificant items to be possessed and shown off. While the Helmer household may have the appearance of being sociably ...
    Related: a doll's house, dolls house, nora helmer, henrik ibsen, insignificant
  • A Dolls House And Tess Of The Durbevilles - 497 words
    A Doll's House and Tess of the D'Urbevilles A Doll's House and Tess of the D'Urbevilles During the late nineteenth century, women were beginning to break out from the usual molds. Two authors from that time period wrote two separate but very similar pieces of literature. Henrik Ibsen wrote the play A Doll's House, and Thomas Hardy wrote Tess of the D'Urbervilles. Ibsen and Hardy both use the male characters to contrast with their female counterparts to illustrate how women are stronger by following their hearts instead of their minds. Ibsen uses Torvald, to depict a world where men choose to follow their minds in place of their hearts. Ibsen has Torvald believe that he is truly in love with ...
    Related: a doll's house, dolls house, tess, tess of the d'urbervilles, nineteenth century
  • A False Utopia - 426 words
    A False Utopia In Brave New World, their society is supposed to be a utopia. In actuality, it is far from a utopia because a state of utopia can never really be reached. There will always be factors, however minuscule they might be, that will affect the balance of perfection that makes up a utopia. It is impossible for a state of perfection to exist in this world and we learn this through the situations and characters in Brave New World. One of the characters in Brave New World that infringe upon the balance of perfection is Bernard. Bernard is the type of man that questions and analyzes everything. He is also shy and insecure. Bernard is the epitome of what the establishment does not want a ...
    Related: utopia, brave new world, freedom of expression, reaching, discarded
  • A Farewell To Arms - 803 words
    A Farewell To Arms Love is impossible to explain or fully understand; it is enfable and war is merely an outcome of disputes between ignorant aristocrats. A Farewell to Arms, by Ernest Hemingway, is a novel about love and war. The narrator, Fredrick Henry is a war-time ambulance driver, and Catherine Barkley is an English nurse, who find themselves in a love affair which must maneuver itself around the restrictions of World War I. The novel begins in Gorizia, Italy the center of operations for Fredricks troop, World War I. Fredrick is an American volunteer and in the Ambulance Corps for the Italian Army. He meets a English nurse Catherine named Barkley and does not truly fall in love with he ...
    Related: a farewell to arms, farewell, farewell to arms, world war i, the narrator
  • A Generation Set Aside - 1,280 words
    A Generation Set Aside Often we hear of the generation gap -- that huge expanse between parent and child. Perhaps it is an acquaintance gap. Young people and adults do not know each other. The inability to communicate often enters the picture. Sometimes it is because neither knows what the other is interested in. They live under the same roof, but they rarely see one another, especially after the teenage years come along. The father goes off to work before the children are awake. Mother may go back to bed after seeing the husband off to work; or off to her own job. Teenagers get themselves up and off to school without seeing either parent. Then after school there is ball practice, band pract ...
    Related: generation x, everyday life, decision making, changing world, abundant
  • A Holy Nation - 1,915 words
    A Holy Nation A Holy Nation After creating the world, a paradise for human kind, God is forced to banish Adam and Eve because they disobey His orders to not eat fruit from the tree of wisdom. This results ultimately in the fall of man to earth. Immediately from the beginning of his time on Earth, man chooses not to follow the path set before him by God but instead spreads evil throughout the world. Therefore, the inherent problem humans face is the pressure to judge between good and evil, the need to aspire to be like God. God's first solution to this problem was to flood the world killing everyone, but those on Noah's arch. God realizes, however, that this is not an answer to the problem th ...
    Related: holy, men and women, growing old, good and evil, pivotal
  • A Journey Though The Golden Gates Of Promise - 2,284 words
    ... because, without them, the United States would become overpopulated and it would slowly deteriorate. If Congress did not create the quota laws as a way to control who is allowed to enter the country, it would leave the magnificent "Golden Gates" open to anyone who wanted to enter the promise land. It is insane to even consider letting everyone of every ethnicity into the United States because the results would be devastating for the American society. American citizens often criticize that the quota laws discriminate towards different ethnic groups, but, in reality, it is common sense to prefer letting immigrants into the country that are more likely to "fit in" with the cultures being p ...
    Related: golden, promise, another country, labor laws, reject
  • A Nobel Writing Style Reviewed - 997 words
    A Nobel Writing Style Reviewed Earnest Hemmingway is an accomplished author with a large audience. While short novels like The Old Man and the Sea have intrigued many, his war stories have won him a Nobel Prize. Hemmingway possesses a writing style all his own, his ability to write descriptively is unparalleled. His use of similar themes, symbolism, irony, and similar main characters is very profound. Hemmingways use of theme makes his writing style significant. In The Old Man and the Sea Santiago went through a lot of trouble to catch his magnificent fish and didnt want to loose it. The author writes, He did not want to look at the fish. He knew that half of him had been destroyed. This quo ...
    Related: nobel, nobel prize, writing style, open door, good night
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