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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: royal society

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  • Aids Conspricay Is Aids Biological Warfare - 3,107 words
    Aids Conspricay - Is AIDS Biological Warfare? Refinance now homeowner even if you have bad credit. 185 loc Aids Conspricay - Is AIDS Biological Warfare? The following is a complete verbatim transcription from a recent broadcast of "Network 23", a program shown on a local Los Angeles Public Access Cable Channel. Good evening, I'm Michel Kassett. This is Network 23. A couple of weeks ago we had a program on the subject of AIDS, addressing the question of whether AIDS-the AIDS virus-was created by the government; and I'm sure that some people were quite shocked by what they heard. We spent that entire program relating to you the evidence of a very substantial amount of factual evidence which su ...
    Related: aids, aids research, biological, biological warfare, warfare
  • Anne Sexton - 1,246 words
    Anne Sexton Anne Sexton The third decade of the twentieth century brought on more explicit writers than ever before, but none were as expressive as Anne Sexton. Her style of writing, her works, the image that she created, and the crazy life that she led are all prime examples of this. Known as one of the most "confessional" poets of her time, Anne Sexton was also one of the most criticized. She was known to use images of incest, adultery, and madness to reveal the depths of her deeply troubled life, which often brought on much controversy. Despite this, Anne went on to win many awards and go down as one of the best poets of all time. Anne Sexton was born Anne Gray Harvey on November 9, 1928 ...
    Related: anne, anne sexton, sexton, personal experience, attempted suicide
  • Ben Franklin - 1,759 words
    Ben Franklin Benjamin Franklin-Scientist and Inventor Benjamin Franklin has influenced American technology, and indirectly, lifestyles by using his proficiencies and intelligence to conduct numerous experiments, arrive at theories, and produce several inventions. Franklin's scientific and analytical mind enabled him to generate many long lasting achievements which contributed to the development and refinement of modern technology. Few national heroes, including George Washington and Thomas Jefferson, played a more significant role in shaping the American way of life than Franklin. According to Fowler, He personified the ideal of the self-made man, and his rise from obscurity to eminence exem ...
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  • Ben Franklin Biographycritique - 1,615 words
    ... del for the national character. He was born in Boston, Massachusetts on Jan. 17, 1706, into a religious Puritan household. His father, Josiah, was a candlemaker and a skillful mechanic. His mother, Abiah Bens parents raised thirteen children--the survivors of Josiahs seventeen children by two wives (#1). Printer & Writer Franklin left school at ten years old when he was pressed into his father's trade. At twelve Ben was apprenticed to his half brother James, a printer of The New England Courant. He generally absorbed the values and philosophy of the English Enlightenment. At the age of 16, Franklin wrote some pieces for the Courant signed Silence Dogood, in which he parodied the Boston a ...
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  • Could Gambling Save Science: Encouraging An Honest Consensus - 4,785 words
    Could Gambling Save Science: Encouraging an Honest Consensus To appear in Social Epistemology, 1992. (version appeared: in Proc. Eighth Intl. Conf. on Risk and Gambling, London, 7/90.) C O U L D G A M B L I N G S A V E S C I E N C E? Encouraging an Honest Consensus by Robin Hanson Visiting Researcher, The Foresight Institute P.O. Box 61058, Palo Alto, CA 94306 USA 510-651-7483 The pace of scientific progress may be hindered by the tendency of our academic institutions to reward being popular, rather than being right. A market-based alternative, where scientists can more formally "stake their reputation", is presented here. It offers clear incentives to be careful and honest while contributi ...
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  • Demorgan - 684 words
    Demorgan Augustus ?The Logical One? De Morgan Augustus De Morgan was born in Mandura, India, on June 27, 1806. His father John was a colonel in the Indian Army. At birth Augustus lost sight in his right eye. After seven months he moved to England with his family. Augustus attended private education where he learned Latin, Greek, Hebrew, and mathematics. He did not excel at school and was made the blunt of all the jokes from his schoolmates. In 1923, at the age of sixteen, he entered Trinity College in Cambridge. He received his bachelor?s degree at Trinity, but was not eligible for the master?s degree because he refused to take the theological exam. He graduated from Trinity College in 1927. ...
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  • Devepopment Of Modern Science In Europe - 1,219 words
    ... nt funds scientists, like the ones at Gresham College, could make great strives in improving the lives of the population and making the nation powerful and rich. Gresham College in London, England was an institution funded by Sir Thomas Gresham, which had close ties with the Royal Navy. Many instruments were developed there which aided in accurate time keeping and observation of the stars, which was so critical in ocean navigation. Instruments such as a newer telescope, the thermometer, the microscope, the pendulum clock, the barometer and the air pump. These instruments not only helped England become a great sea power, by enabling ships to travel farther and return safely, but gave the ...
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  • Edward Jenner - 501 words
    Edward Jenner Brooke Basiri Mrs. Frey World History Honors 14 April 2000 Edward Jenner was born in Berkeley in 1749. Orphaned until he was 5 years old, his brothers and sisters wanted him to get involved with medicine. He completed his training with the great surgeon John Hunter at St. George's Hospital in London. At the age of 23 he returned to Berkeley as the local doctor, leaving only to continue smaller practices in London and Cheltenham. The Chantry became his home for 38 years. From the early days of his career, Jenner was interested by country-lore which held that milk-maids who caught the cowpox could not catch smallpox, one of the most feared diseases of all time. (It had been know ...
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  • England Latin Anglia, Political Division Of The Island Of Great Britain, Constituting, With Wales, The Principal Division Of - 4,705 words
    ... ion that was to last for 400 years. William was a hard ruler, punishing England, especially the north, when it disputed his authority. His power and efficiency can be seen in the Domesday Survey, a census for tax purposes, and in the Salisbury Oath of allegiance, which he demanded of all tenants. He appointed Lanfranc, an Italian clergyman, as archbishop of Canterbury. He also promoted church reform, especially by the creation of separate church courts, but retained royal control. When William died in 1087, he gave England to his second son, William II (Rufus), and Normandy to his eldest son, Robert. Henry, his third son, in due time got bothEngland in 1100, when William II died in a hun ...
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  • Ernest Rutherford - 747 words
    Ernest Rutherford Ernest Rutherford was born in New Zealand in 1871 as one of 12 children. It was Rutherford who first "split" an atom and who discovered the atomic "nucleus", a name that he invented. For this he is regarded as the greatest experimental physicist of his time. Rutherford was one of the first and most important researchers in nuclear physics. Soon after the discovery of radioactivity in 1986 by the French physicist Antoine Henri Becquerel, Rutherford discovered the three different types of radiation. By covering his Uranium with thin foils of aluminum, gradually increasing the number of foils. For the first three layers of foil the radiation escaping from the uranium decreased ...
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  • Ernest Rutherford - 747 words
    Ernest Rutherford Ernest Rutherford was born in New Zealand in 1871 as one of 12 children. It was Rutherford who first "split" an atom and who discovered the atomic "nucleus", a name that he invented. For this he is regarded as the greatest experimental physicist of his time. Rutherford was one of the first and most important researchers in nuclear physics. Soon after the discovery of radioactivity in 1986 by the French physicist Antoine Henri Becquerel, Rutherford discovered the three different types of radiation. By covering his Uranium with thin foils of aluminum, gradually increasing the number of foils. For the first three layers of foil the radiation escaping from the uranium decreased ...
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  • Ernest Rutherford - 640 words
    Ernest Rutherford Rutherford was born on August 30, 1871, in Nelson, New Zealand. He was educated at the University of New Zealand and the University of Cambridge. He was a professor of physics at McGill University in Montreal, Quebec from 1989 to 1907. He was also professor at the University of Manchester in England. After 1919 he was professor of experimental physics and director of the Cavendish Lab at the University of Cambridge moreover held a professorship, after 1920, at the Royal Institution of Great Britain in London. Rutherford stated that an atom consists largely of empty space, with an electrically positive nucleus in the center and electrically negative electrons orbiting the nu ...
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  • European History - 1,090 words
    European History Charles et Secondat, Baron de la Brede et de Montesquieu Charles de Secondat, Baron de la Brede et de Montesquieu was born in 1689 to a French noble family. "His family tree could be traced 350 years, which in his view made its name neither good nor bad." (The Encyclopedia of Social Sciences, p. 68) Montesquieu's views started to be shaped at a very early age. A beggar was chosen to be his godfather to remind him of his obligations to the poor. Montesquieu's education started at the age of 11 when he was sent to Juilly, a school maintained by the Congregation of the Oratory. From 1705 to 1709 he studied law in Bordeaux. "From 1705 to 1709 he was a legal apprentice in Paris. ...
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  • George Washington Carver - 1,042 words
    George Washington Carver 'It is not the style of clothes one wears, neither the kind of automobile one drives, nor the amount of money one has in the bank, that counts. These mean nothing. It is simply service that measures success.'--George Washington Carver. George Washington Carver paved the way for agriculturists to come. He always went for the best throughout his whole life. He didn't just keep the best for himself; he gave it away freely for the benefit of mankind. Not only did he achieve his goal as the world's greatest agriculturist, but also he achieved the equality and respect of all. George Washington Carver was born near Diamond Grove, Missouri in 1864. He was born on a farm owne ...
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  • History - 329 words
    History Sir Isaac Newton; His Three Laws of Motion Isaac Newton was born on Christmas day in 1642, in Lincolnshire, England. Newton attended Trinity College in 1661 and had both his Bachelor of Arts and his Master of Arts by 1669. That same year he became the associate of the French Academy of Sciences. He was elected to Parilment, then appointed a warden, and finally, President of the Royal Society. Newton was a master of science and mathematics. He discovered calculus, before Leibniz' became popular. Perhaps Newton's most popular discovery, though, was gravity. As the story goes, Sir Isaac Newton was resting under a tree one day in his garden, when an apple fell from it and hit him on the ...
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  • History Of Chemistry - 1,607 words
    History Of Chemistry History of Chemistry Introduction: Humans have always been very curios creatures. The have always wondered about what they are and why they are here. Our limited knowledge of the environment has always urged for new things to be discovered. The desire to understand the world better has made people search for rational answers, for principles and laws. For centuries people have tried to unlock the mysterious world that surrounds them. History: Because myths did not explain things well enough the Greeks began to ask questions about the world around them. They did this so thoroughly and so brilliantly that the era between 600 and 400 B.C. is called the golden age of philosop ...
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  • How The Government May Have Created Aids - 4,554 words
    How the Government May Have Created AIDS The following is a complete verbatim transcription from a recent broadcast of "Network 23", a program shown on a local Los Angeles Public Access Cable Channel. FULL TRANSCRIPTION FROM NETWORK 23: Good evening, I'm Michel Kassett. This is Network 23. A couple of weeks ago we had a program on the subject of AIDS, addressing the question of whether AIDS -- the AIDS virus -- was created by the government; and I'm sure that some people were quite shocked by what they heard. We spent that entire program relating to you the evidence of a very substantial amount of factual evidence which supports the proposition that AIDS is a synthetic biological agent that ...
    Related: aids, aids research, american government, states government, united states government
  • How The Government May Have Created Aids - 4,360 words
    ... . Although decades have passed and untold billions have been spent in research, CANCER is still with us, the second major cause of death in America. The most dreaded fear that all oncologists (cancer doctors), virologists and immunologists live with is that some day CANCER in one form or another will become a contagious disease, transferable from one person to another. AIDS has now made that fear a reality and if you think you're safe because you're not gay or promiscuous, or because you're not sexually active, then you had better watch this videotape very carefully and then watch it again and again if necessary, until you fully understand what Dr. Strecker is telling you as he takes you ...
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  • Hydroponics - 1,601 words
    Hydroponics The word "hydroponics" is thought to have been derived from the Latin"water working." Water is the basis for hydroponics. Stated plainly, hydroponics is the growth of plants without soil. History Though often thought of as modern and experimental, hydroponics is an ancient practice. Though it wasnt known at the time, the Hanging Gardens of Babylon were hydroponic. Less famous, the Aztecs Raft Gardens also were hydroponic. In the year 1699, scientist John Woodward presented a paper before the Royal Society of England. His paper concerned an experiment that he had performed involving plants grown in polluted river water versus plants grown in rainwater. This paper attacked the prob ...
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  • Isaac Newton - 1,262 words
    Isaac Newton Isaac Newton was one of the greatest scientists of all time. He is best-known for his discovery of the law of universal gravitation and the laws of motion. Much of modern science is based on the understanding and use of his laws. Isaac Newton was born on Christmas Day, 1642, in the small English town of Woolsthorpe. His father, a farmer, died shortly before Isaac was born. When the boy was three years old, his mother remarried and moved to another town. Isaac stayed on at the farm in Woolsthorpe with his grandmother. After attending small country school, he was sent at the age of twelve to the Kings School in the near by town of Grantham. At first Isaac was a poor student. He ca ...
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