Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: active euthanasia

  • 37 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • Active Euthenasia A Kantian Perspective - 1,259 words
    Active Euthenasia - A Kantian Perspective Matchmaker.com: Sign up now for a free trial. Date Smarter! Active Euthenasia - A Kantian Perspective Euthanasia is one of society's more widely, and hotly debated moral issues of our time. More directly, active euthanasia, which by definition, is; "Doing something, such as administering a lethal drug, or using other means that cause a person's death."1 Passive euthanasia, defined as; "Stopping (or not starting) some treatment, which allows a person to die, the person's condition causes his or her death,"2 seems not to be as debated, perhaps not as recognized, as it's counterpart. I have chosen to look more closely at the issue of active euthanasia, ...
    Related: active euthanasia, kantian, concise oxford dictionary, health care, personally
  • Assisted Suicide - 1,054 words
    Assisted Suicide It is upsetting and depressing living life in the shadow of death. Many questions appear on this debatable topic, such as should we legalize euthanasia? What is euthanasia? What is assisted suicide? What is the difference between Passive and Active Euthanasia? What is Voluntary, Non-voluntary and Involuntary Euthanasia? What is Mercy Killing? What is Death with dignity? But if euthanasia was legalized, wouldn't patients then die peacefully rather than using plastic bags or other methods? And unfortunately the list continues. No one denies that there are many vulnerable persons who require the protection of the law. Take, for example, those in a temporary state of clinical de ...
    Related: assisted suicide, physician assisted, physician assisted suicide, physician-assisted suicide, suicide
  • Assisted Suicide - 1,648 words
    Assisted Suicide Assisted Suicide: Ethical or Immoral? Assisted Suicide, also known as mercy killing, occurs when a physician provides the means (drugs or other agents) by which a person can take his or her own life. This assistance is one of the most debated issues today in society followed by abortion. Physicians are frequently faced with the question of whether or not assisted suicide is ethical or immoral. Although assisted suicide is currently illegal in almost all states in America, it is still often committed. Is assisted suicide ethical? Studies have found that the majority of Americans support assisted suicide. One must weigh both sides of the argument before they can decide. On Jul ...
    Related: assisted suicide, physician assisted, physician assisted suicide, physician-assisted suicide, suicide
  • Assisted Suicide - 1,178 words
    Assisted Suicide Over the past ten to twenty years a big issue has been made over a person1s right to commit suicide or not. The American courts have had to deal with everything from assisted suicides to planned suicides, and whether the constitution gives the American people the right to take their own lives or whether it says they have the power to allow someone else to take their lives. They have had to determine in some cases whether or not homicide charges needed to be brought up and others times whether or not it was done for an underlying reason such as insurance fraud. There are several aspects to suicide and the law, but we are only going to discuss a few of them. First of all we wi ...
    Related: assisted suicide, suicide, right to life, family member, terminally
  • Ethnobotany - 630 words
    Ethnobotany An Available Option Try to imagine yourself or someone you hold close to you being very sick, so sick that just being alive each day gives more pain and suffering than the previous day. Not one person should have to suffer from a disease that is incurable and leads inevitably to death. With an assisted suicide a person and his or her family can be relieved of the agony of the illness. Euthanasia is sometimes considered to be the best option for a loved one who is in intractable pain, and should be an option available to patients who meet qualifications and agree to the assistance in suicide. There are two different forms of Euthanasia: Active and Passive. Active Euthanasia is the ...
    Related: active euthanasia, assisted suicide, clinical depression, temporary, breathing
  • Euthanaisa - 1,254 words
    Euthanaisa Euthanasia Euthanasia is, according to Webster dictionary, the act of killing an individual for the reason of mercy. This paper will examen the issue of active and passive euthanasia. Active euthanasia is an intervention that would cause death to take place when it would not otherwise happen. Passive euthanasia is the decision to withold help from an individual, ultimately leading to the death of the individual. This paper is supposed to deal with the circumstances, if any, that euthanasia, active or passive, would be morally permissible. Before I build the wall of moral delineation between these two scenarios, consider that they are but two possible choices on a broad continuum o ...
    Related: morally acceptable, natural process, webster dictionary, intervene, morally
  • Euthanasia - 1,535 words
    Euthanasia Matchmaker.com: Sign up now for a free trial. Date Smarter! Euthanasia Lisa, a 43-year-old woman was diagnosed with lung cancer, terminal disease. For the past 2 years Lisa has been receiving chemotherapy and taking numerous types of medication trying to prolong her life. This life prolonging treatment caught up with her. Everyday now Lisa has to battle just to get out of bed, everyday getting worse and worse. The doctors now tell Lisa she has six to eight months to live, and she has to receive 6 hours of therapy everyday. Lisa then breaks down in tears. She decides she doesn't want to go through anymore pain or suffering. Now knowing it is only a matter of time before she dies, s ...
    Related: active euthanasia, euthanasia, voluntary euthanasia, assisted suicide, doctor who
  • Euthanasia - 1,564 words
    Euthanasia Euthanasia continues to be an extremely controversial issue in society, and there are many opposing viewpoints concerning this specific subject. The case of Sue Rodriguez versus the province of British Columbia, is one that demonstrates the high degree of debate over such a sensitive topic, as euthanasia. The following is an analytical examination of the case at hand, and a critical comparison of it, to the theories of Patrick Nowell-Smith. When relating the theories of Patrick Nowell -Smith to the case of Sue Rodriguez, it is evident that he would not agree with the judges final decision. Firstly, it is necessary to discuss some of the relevant and significant points of the case. ...
    Related: active euthanasia, euthanasia, passive euthanasia, canadian charter of rights, human life
  • Euthanasia - 902 words
    Euthanasia Euthanasia Because our medical technology has improved so much, we are literally able to postpone death. People suffering from incurable diseases or injuries that would have died are being kept alive on machines. Because of this, people have argued for years over the legality of euthanasia. Some believe people should die with honor and not suffer. Others simply call it assisted suicide. Euthanasia should be an option for patients in extreme medical situations. The word euthanasia simply means an easy or painless death (eu meaning well, thanatos meaning death). Euthanasia was first started by the Greeks and has spread throughout the world (Koop 88). Although the act of euthanasia i ...
    Related: active euthanasia, euthanasia, passive euthanasia, hippocratic oath, different types
  • Euthanasia - 575 words
    Euthanasia Euthanasia is one of the most acute and uncomfortable contemporary problems in medical ethics. Is Euthanasia Ethical? The case for euthanasia rests on one main fundamental moral principle: mercy. It is not a new issue; euthanasia has been discussed-and practised-in both Eastern and Western cultures from the earliest historical times to the present. But because of medicine's new technological capacities to extend life, the problem is much more p Euthanasia is a way of granting mercy-both by direct killing and by letting the person die. This principle of mercy establishes two component duties: 1. the duty not to cause further pain or suffering; and 2. the duty to act to end pain or ...
    Related: active euthanasia, euthanasia, passive euthanasia, pain management, terminal illness
  • Euthanasia - 1,059 words
    ... heir life because they feel like a burden to their family. If this is so, what has the world come to when the people that a patient has known, loved, and respected for so long, makes them feel like a burden. A person is supposed to be able to go to their family for support, that1s what a family is all about. Sticking together and getting through problems the right way, not ending one1s life. Many times a patient feels like a burden because of treatment costs. The cost of treatment is way too high for many patients to afford, so they go to their families. But rather than support and help, the patient gets resistance and feels as though they have become a burden. This causes them to want t ...
    Related: active euthanasia, euthanasia, passive euthanasia, good health, assisted suicide
  • Euthanasia - 1,792 words
    Euthanasia Euthanasia, is one of the most controversial issues of our time. This diver se issue raises many questions such as: how should decisions be made, and by whom? What should be determined as a matter of law and what left a matter of discretion and judgment? Should those who want to die, or who are in a "persistent vegetative state" be allowed to die voluntarily? Who should decide: the patient, the physician, the courts, or the families? The pro-euthanasia arguments turn on the individual case of the patient in pain, suffering at the center of an intolerable existence. When life becomes nbearable, quick death can be the answer. If living persons become so ill that they cannot tolerate ...
    Related: active euthanasia, euthanasia, social situations, paul d, beloved
  • Euthanasia - 808 words
    Euthanasia Euthanasia Euthanasia is the practice of mercifully ending a persons life in order to release the person from an incurable disease, intolerable suffering, or undignified death. The word euthanasia derives from the Greek for good death and originally referred to intentional mercy killing. When medical advances made prolonging the lives of dying or comatose patients possible, the term euthanasia was also applied to a lack of action to prevent death. There are three practices that are involved with Euthanasia. The first one is voluntary (or active) euthanasia, where the person asks to be killed. This involves painlessly putting individuals to death for merciful reasons, as when a doc ...
    Related: active euthanasia, euthanasia, passive euthanasia, voluntary euthanasia, ancient greece
  • Euthanasia - 913 words
    Euthanasia A man, well into his forties, lies helplessly in the cold room of the hospital. He eagerly waits for the results of his tests that are to be hand delivered by the warm-hearted doctor. He lies there, his skin is pasty white, his body is slowly deteriorating both inside and out, and his hair is gradually falling out. Yet somehow the man manages to fight for his life, striving to be able to go home to his wife, play football with his son, and take his dog Nasia, for a walk. In the faint distance the man can hear the footsteps of the doctor, the sound intensifying as the doctor get closer. As the physician approaches the door the mans heart thumps louder, and faster, in sync with the ...
    Related: active euthanasia, euthanasia, passive euthanasia, lung cancer, human life
  • Euthanasia - 626 words
    Euthanasia Euthanasia, which means "good" or "peaceful" death, has been practiced through the ages. Doctors have always been dedicated to the task of easing pain and suffering, to make dying easier. Adding the adjective "active" alters the meaning of euthanasia. The emphasis shifts from comforting the dying to inducing death. The practice of voluntary euthanasia and assisted suicide would cause society to devalue all life, especially the lives of the dying, the disabled, and the elderly. We should not understate the agonies involved in chronic pain and suffering. Nobody wants to see a loved one suffer or make the decisions that accompany medical science's ability to prolong life. The same te ...
    Related: active euthanasia, euthanasia, voluntary euthanasia, human life, human beings
  • Euthanasia - 1,452 words
    Euthanasia The word euthanasia is derived from the Greek word eu for good and thantos which means death and originally referred to intentional mercy killing. But the word it euthanasia has acquired a more complex meaning in modern times. Proponents of euthanasia believe that a dying patient has the right to end their suffering and leave the world in a dignified manner. Those who contest euthanasia believe that man does not have the right to end another person's life no matter what pain they endure. Euthanasia is one of the most important public policy issues being debated today. The outcome of debate will profoundly affect family relationships, interaction between doctors and patients, and c ...
    Related: active euthanasia, euthanasia, passive euthanasia, voluntary euthanasia, attempted suicide
  • Euthanasia Immoral Or Human Right - 507 words
    Euthanasia - Immoral or Human Right? Recent debates over active euthanasia, "killing" a terminally ill patient, in Holland, has risen the question whether euthanasia is immoral or a simple human right. Doctors seem to have no doubt. They made an oath. The definition of Euthanasia depends on whether it is active or passive. Active Euthanasia i only allowed in Holland, and it means that the doctor takes direct measures to put a patient to sleep, whereas passive Euthanasia only involves stopping pill consumption, or stopping treatment. In England, only passive Euthanasia is allowed. Euthanasia touches some of the deepest feelings in human beings. It is the power over life and death, and respons ...
    Related: active euthanasia, euthanasia, human beings, immoral, passive euthanasia
  • Euthanasia In Australia - 1,294 words
    ... mmonwealth parliament considered the Rights of the Terminally Ill Act to represent a basic shift in Australia's ethos and social fabric. It had additional national significance as all Australians, indeed all people, could have used the Act. It therefore became not just a matter for the people of the Northern Territory, but a matter concerning all people of Australia. The Constitutional framework of Australia divides legislative responsibility between the States and the Commonwealth. The Territories derive their legislative capacity from the Commonwealth, whereas the States do not. States therefore, are different to Territories. Territorians are consequently subjected to a different legis ...
    Related: active euthanasia, australia, euthanasia, voluntary euthanasia, doctor patient relationship
  • Euthanasia In Canada - 1,329 words
    Euthanasia In Canada There is considerable debate today, both among the public and the politicians, about euthanasia. While the government is hesitatant to venture into morals and ethics, it appears that euthanasia is gaining more press coverage, in light of the Sue Rodriguez and Robert Latimer cases. Indeed, the issue is difficult to resolve, and despite few advances, the government has enacted penalties in the Criminal Code to punish assisted suicide. Without reservation, euthanasia is illegal in Canada. An increasing number of people are turning to doctor-assisted suicide. As a result of a more liberal political arena, more people are agreeing that some form of euthanasia must be acceptab ...
    Related: active euthanasia, canada, euthanasia, passive euthanasia, personal choice
  • Euthanasia Mercy Killing - 1,039 words
    Euthanasia Mercy Killing Sue Rodriguez has reminded us all of our own mortality and our need to think carefully about the kind of society we want to live and to die in. Sue Rodriguez was known through the media, and her well spoken and eloquent speeches. People painfully in support of what she believed in, watched as her strength was sapped by the devastating disease (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis), and we were moved by her clear thought and her bravery as a person facing death. Here was a woman who acted on her beliefs with courage and tenacity and whose grace has enriched us all. It is no defense to point to the fact that a person has requested to be killed: "No person is entitled to conse ...
    Related: active euthanasia, euthanasia, mercy, mercy killing, passive euthanasia
  • 37 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2