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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: rome

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  • Ancient Rome - 1,988 words
    Ancient Rome Roman games were much like Greek games, but there was more physical contact sports such as Gladiator combats, man against beast, and water battles. Chariot races were the same as the Greek chariot races. Rome had many different types of chariots. Biage were chariots pulled by two horses, and quadrigae chariots were pulled by four horses. Each race had 12 chariots going on one track at once. The racers would take 7 laps around the arena which would be a total of 5 miles long. Teams of four chariots would be either red, blue, green, or red in the chariot racing. Gladiators combat was where two men fought until one was dead. The gladiators would be armed with a weapon to make the b ...
    Related: ancient china, ancient civilizations, ancient egypt, ancient greece, ancient rome, greece and rome, rome
  • Armor Of Ancient Rome - 1,947 words
    Armor Of Ancient Rome Armor of Ancient Rome Ancient Rome expended a great deal of economic resources and effort upon conquest and expansion through military means. The role of armor was fundamental in this expansion as it played a significant role in the success of the Roman armies on the battlefield. There were three common requirements for armor construction throughout its history: The first was that armor had to be flexible enough to allow the wearer freedom of movement; second, it also had to be lightweight enough to be worn without tiring the wearer while providing protection against opponents' weapons; and third, armor had to be cost effective. These three aspects influenced the evolut ...
    Related: ancient rome, armor, rome, military force, praetorian guard
  • Armor Of Ancient Rome - 1,908 words
    ... and relieving the shoulders of part of their burden. Moreover, tests using contemporary arrow types by Massey suggests that most arrowhead types consistently penetrated the mail to a depth that would prove lethal to the wearer. However, bunching of the mail at suspension points prevented penetration of the mail beyond a depth of 3-5 cm. This [implies] that the doubling of mail shoulder defenses known to be practiced by both Romans and Celts may have saved the life of their owners." These observations are consistent with Plutarch's writings of the life of Marcus Licinius Crassus who in 53 B.C. engaged the Parthians with his army in the deserts of Mesopotamia at the Battle of Carrhae. Plut ...
    Related: ancient rome, armor, imperial rome, rome, roman army
  • Brutus: Anything For Rome - 720 words
    Brutus: Anything For Rome Kohlberg's seven level morality scale illustrates his six stages of human development. The stages are split up into three levels, preconventional, conventional, and postconventional morality. Brutus' loyalty and need to preserve the goodness of Rome is a continuous personal theme for him throughout the play. He has this intense loyalty to Rome and follows the moral standards set by the society. Brutus exemplifies the characteristics of a person at stage five, the social contract, which can be found in the postconventional level. Brutus believes that the welfare of Rome is the most important thing and will do almost anything to help preserve the good of Rome. He hone ...
    Related: rome, personality traits, common good, social contract, continuous
  • By The Time Hadrians Contributions To His Country Had Succeeded, And Death Was Near He Was The Most Hated Man In Rome However - 709 words
    By the time Hadrian's contributions to his country had succeeded, and death was near; he was the most hated man in Rome. However, throughout his reign, he was regarded as a noble leader. "The Roman emperor Hadrian exercised a profound organizational influence on the Greco-Roman world. He worked successfully toward the codification of Roman law and the strengthening of imperial border defenses (Eadie 8)." Emperor Hadrian made many important contributions to Roman culture, and he was also known as one of the greatest Roman emperors in history. Hadrian was born on January, 26 76 a.d. in Spain. In his youth, he developed a strong interest in Hellenic culture. This earned him his nickname "The Gr ...
    Related: emperor hadrian, rome, roman emperor, greek culture, founded
  • Christianity In Ancient Rome - 979 words
    Christianity in Ancient Rome The way the Romans viewed Christianity is slightly different from the general theory. The Romans did not spend all their time hunting down Christians in order to crucify them or throw them to the lions. When Christianity first started in the Roman Empire, it was viewed as another sect of Judaism. There was no differentiating between the Jews and the Christians in the eyes of the Roman government. The Christians were seen simply as a more radical group of Jews. They were also not completely trusted because of their monotheistic belief and non-acceptance of the Roman gods. Not much was even known about them by the Romans because of their mostly secretive ways. This ...
    Related: ancient rome, christianity, rome, roman empire, general theory
  • During The Early Middle Ages, Europe Was Undergoing Various Changes And Development In Its Recovery From The Fall Of Rome Med - 1,257 words
    During the early Middle Ages, Europe was undergoing various changes and development in its recovery from the fall of Rome. Medieval civilization developed due to the fall of Rome through the integration of Greco-Roman, Christian and Germanic elements. As medieval society grew and changed, several different communities were established. Three such communities were the feudal community, the monastic community and the intellectual community. Medieval communities exhibited a bias against women which is exemplified by women's struggles to improve their status. There were two feudal ages and the position of the woman changed slightly during these two ages. The first feudal age was the age of feuda ...
    Related: early middle ages, middle ages, recovery, rome, undergoing
  • How Julius Caesar Changed Rome - 963 words
    How Julius Caesar Changed Rome the ill P Gaius Julius Caesar helped establish the vast Roman Empire. Caesar's triumph in a civil war in the 40s BC made him the absolute ruler of Rome. Caesar was neither good nor bad, rather, he was a force of change. His folly was ambition, for when he took power the way to advance changed so drastically that the other Romans ambitions were thwarted, which lead to political jealousies among his opponents and his assassination. Caesar's rise to power obliterated the traditional way of attaining high office in Rome. When Caesar 'became' the Republic, he inadvertently created new needs: a need to be among Caesar's circle of friends, a need to feel important in ...
    Related: caesar, gaius julius, gaius julius caesar, julius, julius caesar, rome
  • Life In Rome - 515 words
    Life in Rome Life in Rome "Was Rome a pleasant city to live in?" Well, writers who wrote about it say that they didn't think so. This is based on survived writings. One big reason why life was not that good was the plan of the city. To many buildings were being built. Emperors were building too many impressive, marble temples. Then in the residential areas were the insulae. They are unplanned blocks of poorly built apartment buildings. These buildings were for the ordinary Roman. They were built very closely, and building collapse was common. Nero made a more systematic reconstruction of the buildings. He used brick concrete instead of wood. Even though he did this, less than twenty years la ...
    Related: rome, twelve tables, permission, caesar
  • Rome - 361 words
    Rome Greek culture laid the foundation for the Roman Empire. The Roman people wanted to be like the Greek people. For example the Romans made a sculpture of the Greek goddess Aphrodite. The Romans recognized the Greek art and architecture to be very well done. Since the Romans likes these traits of the Greek they used the Greeks ideas and created there own. That was the basis of the Roman Empire. In 64 AD there was a fire in Rome that burned down a large part of the city. When Rome decided to reconstruct they built the city back up in Greek style. They used the Greek architecture, and made it into their own. In 385 AD the Roman Empire fell into the West-Roman Empire and the East-Roman Empire ...
    Related: rome, greek culture, roman architecture, greek gods, goddess
  • Rome - 692 words
    Rome Rome is an ancient city located on the western coast of Italy by the Meditterranian Sea.(3:289) The city of Rome was founded, according to the legend, by Romulus in 753 BC. Remus and Romulus were two mythological sons of Mars, the god of war. "T hrough military expansion and colonizations, and by granting citizenship to conquered tribes, the city joined all of Italy south of the Po in the 100-year period before 268 BC." First, the Latin and other tribes were joined, then the Etruscans (a civili zed people north of Rome) and the Greek colonies in the south. "With a large army and several hundred thousand in reserve, Rome defeated Carthage in the 3 Punic Wars, 264-241, 218-201, 149-146, ( ...
    Related: rome, santa maria, first emperor, punic wars, romans
  • Rome Builders - 719 words
    Rome Builders The Ancient Roman culture had a direct impact on how we view art, literature, architecture, education and religion. Early Roman civilizations were very sophisticated and idealistic. They build great architectural buildings and performed famous playwrights at these ancient places. Romans were considered to most advanced civilization of their time. With beautiful statues, well designed buildings, and some of the greatest philosophers came from Rome. One of the most noticeable characteristics of Roman society and culture is the impact of the Greeks. Greek civilization played an increasing role in Roman culture. Greek ambassadors, merchants, and artists traveled to Rome and spread ...
    Related: builders, rome, roman republic, basic elements, consistent
  • Rome Italy - 990 words
    Rome Italy My Trip to Rome, Italy I had learned I was being sent to Italy in March of 2000 for a machine tool exhibition. I found out the happy news just before leaving work. Excitedly I jumped into my car and started my journey home. As I drove home down I-95 through all of the usual evening traffic I just kept thinking about ho I was going to tell my husband we were going to Italy. That night I continuously paced the floor looking out of my bedroom window to see if my husband was home from work yet. As he drove up in our driveway I ran outside to tell him the good news. I said, Nick guess where we are going in March? Before he could even say where I yelled out Italy! Italy, he said with a ...
    Related: ancient rome, italy, rome, european history, guided tour
  • Rome, History Of The Accounts Of The Regal Period Have Come Down Overlaid With Such A Mass Of Myth And Legend That Few Can Be - 2,982 words
    Rome, History of. The accounts of the regal period have come down overlaid with such a mass of myth and legend that few can be verified; Roman historians of later times, lacking authentic records, relied on fabrications of a patriotic nature. Following this period, when a republic was established, Rome became a world power and emerged as an empire with extensive boundaries. The Legendary Period of the Kings (753-510 BC) Rome was said to have been founded by Latin colonists from Alba Longa, a nearby city in ancient Latium. The legendary date of the founding was 753 BC; it was ascribed to Romulus and Remus, the twin sons of Rhea Silvia, a vestal virgin and the daughter of Numitor, king of Alba ...
    Related: history, legend, myth, regal, world power
  • Rome, History Of The Accounts Of The Regal Period Have Come Down Overlaid With Such A Mass Of Myth And Legend That Few Can Be - 2,893 words
    ... life in 79 BC. In addition to proscription, Sulla employed confiscation of lands as a method of suppressing his political enemies. Confiscated lands were either given to the veterans of his legions, who neglected them, or abandoned to become wasteland; Rome's former rich agricultural economy began to decline, and thenceforth more and more of the city's food was imported, Africa becoming the major source of Rome's grain supply. The Rise of Caesar In 67 BC the statesman and general Pompey the Great, who had fought the Marian party in Africa, Sicily, and Spain, cleared the Mediterranean of pirates and was then put in charge of the war against Mithridates. Meanwhile his rival Gaius Julius C ...
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  • Romulus Was Ounder And First King Of Rome He And His Twin Brother, Remus, Were The Sons Of Mars, God Of War, And Of Rhea Silv - 274 words
    Romulus was ounder and first king of Rome. He and his twin brother, Remus, were the sons of Mars, god of war, and of Rhea Silvia, also called Ilia, one of the vestal virgins. Rhea Silvia was the daughter of Numitor, king of Alba Longa, who had been deposed by his younger brother Amulius. Amulius had made Rhea Silvia a priestess so that she would have no children to make claims against his throne. After the birth of her two boys, to remove any threat against himself, he had them thrown in a basket into the Tiber River. The twins were not drowned, however. They were rescued and nursed by a she-wolf on the slope of the Palatine Hill and were later discovered by the shepherd Faustulus and reared ...
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  • The Corruption Of Power In Rome - 965 words
    The Corruption of Power in Rome The Corruption of Power in Rome Julius Caesar was murdered on the Ides of March in 44 B.C. by the people he trusted and thought were his friends. The justification for his death was that he was too ambitious and wanted too much power. The very concept of government in Rome was against dictatorship, to which Caesar posed a great threat. Although Rome recognized the need for a distinct leader, the power given to the leader was not absolute. The Romans devised a system to avoid dictatorship and retain freedom, but at the same time maintain control of the affairs of the Empire. These leaders, originally given the title of praetor, meaning "to lead the way" (Asimov ...
    Related: corruption, rome, julius caesar, gaius julius caesar, corrupt
  • The Fall Of Rome - 906 words
    The Fall of Rome The Fall of Rome The Roman Empire was without a doubt the most powerful governing body in the Mediterranean ever. Why did Rome fall? There was not any single cause to the fall of Rome. It was many things occurring in succession to each other. After the Punic wars with Carthage, Rome acquired many new lands that it did not have before. During peace times it was easy to govern these areas but during war times it proved difficult. The government had to pay soldiers to patrol the frontiers of the empire; it could no longer rely on the loot to serve as the pay for the soldiers. This took a significant amount of money out of the Roman treasury. Some emperors wanted to save money a ...
    Related: rome, civil service, central asia, finished goods, wages
  • The Julian Emperors Were The Emperors Of Rome That Were Related To Julius Caesar, Hence - 1,039 words
    The Julian Emperors were the emperors of Rome that were related to Julius Caesar, hence the name. There were four of them that ruled from A.D.14 to A.D.68. Some of them were related to him vaguely, but legally they were still related to him. The first person in the Julian Empire was Tiberius. He was born in Rome on November 16, 42. When he was four, his mother divorced his father and married the Emperor Augustus. He had Tiberius educated on the art of war, and had him command an expedition to Armenia where he fought the Pannonians. While he was fighting, Augustus made Tiberius end his happy marriage to Vipsania Agrippa, the daughter of the Roman general Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa. Augustus the ...
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  • The Punic Wars Was A Series Of Three Wars Fought Between Rome And Carthage For A Period Of 118 Years Rome, One Of The Sides O - 508 words
    The Punic Wars was a series of three wars fought between Rome and Carthage for a period of 118 years. Rome, one of the sides of these wars, was a immense empire whose influence covered much of the known world at the time. Carthage, the other player in the Punic Wars, was a city state on the North Coast of Africa which had partial control over Sicily before wars and whose location was ideal for trading ground in the Mediterranean. The first war (264-241 BC) started because a conflict between two different city states on the island of Sicily, Messana and Syracuse, had been going on and eventually both Rome and Carthage stepped in. During their intervention, Carthage began to control more and m ...
    Related: carthage, punic, punic war, punic wars, rome, second punic
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