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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: roman republic

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  • Corbeill Political Humor In The Late Roman Republic - 1,232 words
    Corbeill - Political Humor In The Late Roman Republic Anthony Corbeill. Controlling Laughter: Political Humor in the Late Roman Republic. Anthony Corbeill is an Associate Professor of Classics, and holds a degree in Classical Languages and Literature from the University of Michigan and the University of California, Berkeley. Professor Corbeill teaches Greek and Latin at all levels, Roman Civlilization, and Greek and Roman Mythology. He is a member of the American Philological Association, the American Classical League, and the Society of Fellows of the American Academy in Rome. Controlling Laughter is a well-organized study which utilizes an original approach to a significant topic. Corbeill ...
    Related: greek and roman mythology, humor, political history, republic, roman, roman mythology, roman republic
  • Moral Decline Of The Roman Republic - 1,951 words
    Moral Decline of the Roman Republic An Exploration of Sallust's and Plutarch's View of the Jamie Neufeld ST# 864583 For: L. Foley Class. 111.3 (08) Though there are varied dates as to the time that the Roman Republic stood, it is agreed upon as lasting approximately 500 years. During the last century of its existence (133 BC -27 BC) there were the many violent years of The Civil Wars and much social strife. Though the end result of these final years of the res publica was the adoption of an Emperor and the birth of the Roman Empire, the focus of this paper will be the presentation of the nature of tensions at the end of the res publica using selections from Sallust and Plutarch as a basis. S ...
    Related: decline, moral life, republic, roman, roman army, roman civilization, roman empire
  • Cicero, Was Truly A Man Of The State His Writings Also Show Us He Was Equally A Man Of Philosophical Temperament And Affluenc - 1,956 words
    ... nd the factors too deeply but rather he relied to mush on the roman historic path as a blueprint. Cicero offered no real comprehensive logic behind his pattern of possible outcomes. Early roman history (tradition) tells of a series of seven kings, and the last, Lucius Tarquinius Superbus, was a tyrannical rex. In the first part of Cicero's diagram a monarch is in place, which can only be followed by a tyrant. After Lucius Tarquinius Superbus overthrow the senate and patricians played a decisive role. The rex's position was abolished and two consuls were elected annual ridding Rome of monarchical and tyrannical rule. This brought Rome into the age of a republic, shortly after the senate g ...
    Related: philosophical, roman state, temperament, roman world, political philosophy
  • Claudius - 465 words
    Claudius Claudius was found hiding behind some balcony curtains by soldiers in the palace after the murder of Caligula by the Praetorian Guard. Instead of seizing and killing him, as Claudius was almost sure they would do, they raised him up on their shoulders and made him emperor! Many writers have depicted Claudius as kind of a befuddled, harmless old man who had been made Emperor so that Romans would have someone in high places to make fun of. In truth, he was an able administrator and ruled well, making many improvements in the government. He gave orders for the conquest of Britain, which the famous Julius Caesar had only invaded and left. The invasion was well planned and carried out. A ...
    Related: claudius, roman republic, civil wars, praetorian guard, caligula
  • Electoral College - 1,801 words
    Electoral College Electoral College The Electoral College, friend or foe? The answer behind this question is in the minds of those that understand it. Whether it be a "friend" or a "foe" there will always be opposing sides and a controversial verse. Since the political circumstance of today, the Electoral College seems to be the topic in every conversation and the thesis to every essay. The uncontrollable desire to know the truth behind the mystery is stirring in the minds of the people in the United States of America. With the 2000 Elections underway sides are beginning to be taken among the people. Many oppose the Electoral College because of the fact that unknowing electors choose their l ...
    Related: college system, electoral, electoral college, founding fathers, controversial issue
  • Governmental Techniques In The Ancient World - 1,978 words
    Governmental Techniques in the Ancient World Throughout history, many techniques have been used for organizing society. Experimentation with different styles primarily took place in the ancient Mediterranean world. Athenian democracy, Hebrew temple state, Hellenic city-states, Hellenistic kingdoms, the Roman Republic, and the Christian Roman Empire were all major forms of governance, each with their own strengths and weaknesses. To determine which of these forms was successful, it is impotent to look at each forms chronological development. Hebrew State Origin The Hebrew State began as a loose confederation of twelve tribes. A tribes elders ruled it, and while there was intermarriage between ...
    Related: ancient world, governmental, world power, athenian democracy, city states
  • Greek And Hebrew Belief In God - 1,217 words
    Greek And Hebrew Belief In God The Hebrews started out enslaved by the Egyptians until they were freed by Moses around 1250 BC. Then the Exodus began from Egypt to the promised land. Moses led the Hebrews to Mt. Sinai to await the word of the lord. Moses dies and his successor Joshua, son of Nun, comes to bring his people to attack east of the Jordan river in Jericho against the Canaanites. Next, was the conquest of Hazor, one of the strongest towns in Canaan the Isrealites took over Hazor and the most Canaanite empire. Before Israel had its first monarchy there was a system of tribal society. There were twelve tribes who were led in times of peace by the elders and in times of war by the ju ...
    Related: greek, hebrew, the bible, persian empire, syrian
  • Julius Caesar - 1,743 words
    ... ew days later because he thought that she had snuck Clodius in. His last wife was in 59 BC to Calpurnia and was politically motivated. Piso was Calpurnia's father and the year after the marriage Caesar arranged for Piso to be consul. Calpurnia remained Caesar's wife till his death in 44 BC. Caesar had many important roles and offices. His uncle, Marius, got him his first job. Marius announced that Caesar would be the Priest of Jupiter. In those days Romans worshipped the traditional gods. Many complex rituals were binded to the worshipping to the gods. Deserving young adults were given ceremonial posts in religious institutions. One of his functions was to be the junior clerk for the Ves ...
    Related: caesar, julius, julius caesar, roman history, first person
  • Julius Caesar - 1,392 words
    Julius Caesar In my opinion, no other man in the history of the world symbolizes military and political strength as much as Julius Caesar does. Caesar was born on July 12, 100 BC in Rome, Italy (Encarta 2000). His father belonged to the prestigious Julian clan (Internet Explorer) His uncle by marriage was Gaius Marius, leader of the Populares which supported agrarian reform and opposed the Optimates (Comptons Encyclopedia). Marius saw to it that Julius Caesar was appointed flamen dialis which is a archaic priesthood with no power. Caesar's marriage in 84 BC to Cornelia, the daughter of Marius's associate was a political Match (Lindsay Salo). When Lucius Cornelius Sulla, Marius's enemy and le ...
    Related: caesar, julius, julius caesar, early life, civil war
  • Julius Caesar By William Shakespeare 1564 1616 - 1,584 words
    Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616) Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616) Type of Work: Tragic drama Setting Rome,- 44 B.C Principal Characters Julius Caesar, popular Roman general and statesman Brutus, a prominent and devout Roman, and close friend to Caesar Cassius, a conspiring enemy of Caesar Marcus Antonius, Caesar's supporter, a brilliant politician Story Overveiw Rome was in an uproar. General Julius Caesar had just returned after having defeated his rival, Pompey His many military triumphs had made him the most powerful man in Rome. The commoners - blindly cheering whoever was in power - flocked into the streets to hail him. As Caesar passed through the ci ...
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  • Julius Caesar Summary - 1,958 words
    Julius Caesar Summary Act I, Scene i Summary Two patricians Flavius and Marcullus enter. They are confused by the fact that the plebeians are not in their work clothes, and begin to ask some plebeians what their jobs are. A carpenter admits he is a carpenter. Next Marcullus asks a cobbler what his job is, and the cobbler answers in a series of puns ("souls" / "soles"), ("withal" / "with awl"). The cobbler explains that everyone is taking the day off to celebrate Caesar's victory over Pompey. Marcullus, in high rhetoric, insults the plebeians for being fickle, since they very recently all liked Pompey. He tells them all to go back home and feel very sorry for dishonoring Pompey's memory. The ...
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  • Julius Caesar Theme - 1,852 words
    Julius Caesar Theme Act I This first Act contains only three scenes, but each are important for many reasons. It begins with two tribunes, Flavius and Murellus, who scold commoners who parade down the street to celebrate Caesar's victory over Pompey. The two tribunes shame the commoners for celebrating the death of one of Rome's former leaders, and they depart solemnly. On February 15th the festival of Lupecalia is celebrated, and Caesar arrives in the city along with Antony and Brutus. A soothesayer approaches Caesar and tells him to, "Beware the ides of March". Brutus and Cassius remain and converse with one and other. Cassius complains that Caesar has become so powerful that even though h ...
    Related: caesar, julius, julius caesar, evil spirit, roman republic
  • Leadership In Ancient Civilizations - 1,300 words
    Leadership in Ancient Civilizations Leadership in Ancient Civilizations During the period of the Roman Republic and the Roman Empire, different leaders exhibited different styles of leadership and employed different political strategies. In addition, these leaders came to power and maintained their control in their own unique ways. Each leader seemed to have his own agenda, which set the tone for that era. Five prominent leaders of this time period were Agricola, Augustus, Julius Caesar, and the brothers Tiberius and Gaius Gracchus. The point to be made with respect to these particular men is related to the obvious correlation between the nature of a leaders agenda and the impact of his reig ...
    Related: ancient civilizations, good leadership, leadership, roman civilization, good leader
  • Machiavelli - 3,021 words
    ... eferring to the notorious but often also highly misunderstood cynical character of Machiavelli's analysis, I want to concentrate in the means, not in the legitimacy of the polities, or in the question of whether their goal is genesis, restoration, defence, or destruction of a polity's existence and liberty. The means, namely, ultimately reveal many relevant features of a polity's character: whether its power is built upon legitimacy and liberty, or upon coercion and terror. Those admirers of Machiavelli, who read his works in a selective way, or out of their historical context, tend to overemphasise the cynical character in the thinking of Machiavelli, who wanted to appear a worthy advis ...
    Related: machiavelli, roman empire, christian nation, middle east, contrary
  • Robert E Lee - 1,832 words
    Robert E. Lee Throughout history, there have been people whose names and faces have become synonymous with the time periods in which they lived. For example, Julius Caesar is synonymous with the late Roman Republic and George Washington is synonymous with the American Revolution. Just like these two men, the name Robert E. Lee has become synonymous with the American Civil War. Not only did Lee rise to become the most important and recognizable person in the Southern Confederacy, but his honor and virtuous acts during and after the war made him a hero to modern-day Americans. Even though he fought for what many consider the morally erroneous side of the war, the virtues of his character have ...
    Related: robert e lee, robert e. lee, jefferson davis, confederate general, resolve
  • Roman And Greek Kingdoms - 1,127 words
    Roman And Greek Kingdoms The Romans, unlike the Greeks were not gifted in abstract thought. They constructed no original system of philosophy, invented no major literary forms, and made no scientific discoveries. Yet, they excelled in the art of government and empire building, they created a workable world-state and developed skills in administration, law, and practical affairs. In the Punic Wars, the Roman republic defeated the Carthaginians in North Africa and Rome inherited the Pergamene Kingdom from the last of the Attalids in 133 B.C. Rome became heir to the legacy of the Hellenistic world of the Greeks. The Hellenistic period which lasted 300 years in is noted by the death of Alexander ...
    Related: greek, greek art, greek culture, roman, roman architecture, roman art, roman empire
  • Roman Art Vs Greek Art - 1,178 words
    Roman Art Vs. Greek Art Paul Johnson Debbie Barret-Graves Western Civilization 10/29/00 Roman Art Vs. Greek Art Throughout history art has consistently reflected the cultural values and social structures of individual civilizations. Ancient art serves as a useful tool to help historians decipher some important aspects of ancient culture. From art we can determine the basic moral and philosophical beliefs of many ancient societies. The differences in arts purpose in Greece and Rome, for example, show us the fundamental differences in each cultures political and moral system. The primary objective of Greek art was to explore the order of nature and to convey philosophical thought, while Roman ...
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  • Roman Law - 2,168 words
    ... e defendant [to court] by force. (Nardo 28-29) The Tribunes of the Plebs protected the Plebs from unjustness, and the Plebs protected them by threatening to strike. As time went on, Patrician control over Plebians gradually decreased, until in 366 BC, the Plebs were allowed to become consul. Soon it became a custom to elect one Pleb and one Patrician (Nardo 28). In 287 BC, the Popular Assembly gained the right to make laws. Rome was ever expanding. In 496 BC, Rome conquered Latium. In 449 BC, the Sabines fell, and in 396 BC, the Etruscans. Instead of trying to oppress conquered tribes and peoples, Rome absorbed them, integrating them into their culture. This made them much easier to cont ...
    Related: roman, roman army, roman empire, roman family, roman republic
  • Rome Builders - 719 words
    Rome Builders The Ancient Roman culture had a direct impact on how we view art, literature, architecture, education and religion. Early Roman civilizations were very sophisticated and idealistic. They build great architectural buildings and performed famous playwrights at these ancient places. Romans were considered to most advanced civilization of their time. With beautiful statues, well designed buildings, and some of the greatest philosophers came from Rome. One of the most noticeable characteristics of Roman society and culture is the impact of the Greeks. Greek civilization played an increasing role in Roman culture. Greek ambassadors, merchants, and artists traveled to Rome and spread ...
    Related: builders, rome, roman republic, basic elements, consistent
  • The Corruption Of Power In Rome - 965 words
    The Corruption of Power in Rome The Corruption of Power in Rome Julius Caesar was murdered on the Ides of March in 44 B.C. by the people he trusted and thought were his friends. The justification for his death was that he was too ambitious and wanted too much power. The very concept of government in Rome was against dictatorship, to which Caesar posed a great threat. Although Rome recognized the need for a distinct leader, the power given to the leader was not absolute. The Romans devised a system to avoid dictatorship and retain freedom, but at the same time maintain control of the affairs of the Empire. These leaders, originally given the title of praetor, meaning "to lead the way" (Asimov ...
    Related: corruption, rome, julius caesar, gaius julius caesar, corrupt
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