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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: rivers

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  • Columbia And Okanagan Rivers - 728 words
    Columbia And Okanagan Rivers While searching for an accessible route to transport furs to the Pacific, Europeans began exploring the B.C. Interior. In 1811 Scottish trader and explorer David Stuart of the Pacific Fur Company sailed to the junction of the Columbia and Okanagan rivers and built Fort Okanagan. He then travelled north to Thompson River and in so doing, established the Okanagan Valley trail that united the Upper Fraser and Lower Columbia sections. By 1824 the trail was dominated by the activities of the Hudson's Bay Company which provided fur caravans along the lake hills until 1847. Between orchards and vineyards remnants of the trail remain for historical hikes. The first perma ...
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  • Geography Colorado River Geographers Can Tell You That The One Thing That Most Rivers And Their Adjacent Flood Plains In The - 2,394 words
    Geography Colorado River Geographers can tell you that the one thing that most rivers and their adjacent flood plains in the world have in common is that they have rich histories associated with human settlement and development. This especially true in arid regions which are very dependent upon water. Two excellent examples are the Nile and the Tigris-Euphrates rivers which show use the relationship between rivers and concentrations of people. However, the Colorado River is not such a good example along most segments of its course. There is no continuous transportation system that parallels the rivers course, and settlements are clustered. The rugged terrain and entrenched river channels are ...
    Related: colorado, colorado river, flood, geography, rivers
  • Geography Colorado River Geographers Can Tell You That The One Thing That Most Rivers And Their Adjacent Flood Plains In The - 2,425 words
    ... e Powell. The Federal Governments outlook is, "why give the tribes more water?" They gave away their rights, and the Federal government does not have the money for water irrigation projects that would benefit so few people. There is another side to the Indian issue, "first in time, first in right". this means that the Indians were there first, before the laws, so therefore the Indians have first right to the water. This would put a totally different slant on distribution of Colorado River water, but most people feel that this issue would be tied up in litigation for years, and because of the benefits of so few, the Indians would likely lose. Citizens groups have become more vocal in the ...
    Related: colorado, colorado river, columbia river, flood, geography, river basin, rivers
  • 15 Geog 123 - 1,575 words
    15 - GEOG - 123 Anthony November 22, 2000 Travels In Alaska Travels in Alaska takes readers on a trip to Alaska through the vivid descriptions of the author, John Muir. The book is based on journals Muir wrote during his visits to Alaska in 1879, 1880, and 1890. These chronicles of his journey relate his observations of nature, glaciers, and the many people he met. Traveling on foot, by canoe, and dogsled Muir experienced excitement discovering unfamiliar types of lands and animals. Each summer Muir and his new found Presbyterian missionary friend S. Hall Young accompanied by Tlingit Indian guides launched extensive voyages of discovery in a thirty foot canoe. John Muir was a naturalists who ...
    Related: typical american, john muir, gold rush, oval, exploration
  • A Brief View Of Early Western Civilization In The 18th Century - 973 words
    A Brief View Of Early Western Civilization In The 18Th Century The area of early western civilization just following the feudal period was a very interesting time in Europe. There were many new innovations and problems in the way of life of the people of that time. Agriculture was still the main occupation of the time for most people. Two big problems that the people faced were those of war and poor harvest. It was said that perhaps the largest problem was the problem with poor grain. For the majority of people there was also the problem of land. For these people they either had no land of their own or insufficient amounts of it to support a family even when times were good. Poor harvests al ...
    Related: century england, civilization, western civilization, prentice hall, third edition
  • A Comparison Of Early Civilizations - 1,178 words
    A comparison of Early Civilizations A comparison of Early civilizations After reading the articles on early civilization, I've identified several similarities and differences about the people who were from these three cultures. The civilizations in the articles include, the people from Mesopotamia, the Quiche' Indians, a tribe in early Meso-America, and "The book of Genesis" which offers a Christian or biblical explanation of how our own civilization originated. I will tell you about how they believed they came into existence and what they thought they should do to ensure their civilization continued. The three stories offered insight on how the different cultures lived by describing how the ...
    Related: comparison, good and evil, adam and eve, christian belief, adam
  • A Introduction - 1,026 words
    A. Introduction During the last twenty years, industrial livestock farms have been replacing the traditional family size farms that once raised most of the nations swine. The number of livestock animals produced in the United States has grown modestly in the past two decades, but the number of farms raising them has slunk dramatically because large producer now dominate the market. The large increase in industry farming has led to large quantities of manure. B. Problem Definition The over abundance of manure has become a problem that leads to problem with Pollution, heated debates between the industries and societies (people of the community), ways to try and find solutions for the pollution ...
    Related: dissolved oxygen, problem definition, real estate, solid, dairy
  • A Separate Peace - 768 words
    A Separate Peace Breaking The Mold In John Knowle's, A Separate Peace, there is a transformation in all the key elements in the book, from the rivers to the tree to the seasons to the characters. The transformation is specifically seen in Leper, Gene, and Phineas. These three young men experience a change not just because of the transitions through adolescence. These changes also come about because of the war, the school, and an injury. Leper Lepellier is a very odd young man. He is quiet and is finds himself always taken by surprise. He really is not popular and that does not concern him in any way. Leper really has no true friends at the Devon school, but talks to Gene. He entertains himse ...
    Related: separate peace, john knowles, lonely, collecting
  • Abraham Of Chaldea - 1,547 words
    Abraham of Chaldea Annonymous The following is a narrative description on the life and times of one of the most powerful characters in the Old Testament. Abraham was indeed a man of God in a time where few men believed in the One true God. Through many triumphs and errors, he always returned to God to lead him back to his calling. His dedication resulted in great promises from God that were eventually fulfilled and affect each of our lives today. His story is our story. Abraham was a native of Chaldea, and a ninth generation descendant of Shem, the son of Noah. He was born on the southern tip of the Tigris and Uuphrates rivers in the city of Ur around 2161BC.1 Before his name was changed to ...
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  • Acid Rain - 1,013 words
    Acid Rain Acid Rain (The Environmental Effects) My first question is , What is Acid Rain? You hear about it all the time in the news and it is very important to the earths ecosystem. In simple terms, acid rain is rain that is more acidic than normal. All objects in nature have a certain level of acicicity but acid rain has too much acid in it. Acid rain is a complicated problem, caused by air pollution. Acid rain's spread and damage involves weather, chemistry, soil, and the life cycles of plants and animals on the land and from acid rain in the water. Acidity is measured using a pH scale, with the number 7 being neutral. Therefore, a body with a pH value of less than 7 is acidic. On the oth ...
    Related: acid, acid rain, rain, air pollution, new england
  • Acid Rain - 1,774 words
    Acid Rain What is acid rain? Acid rain is the term for pollution caused when sulfur and nitrogen dioxides combine with atmospheric moisture. The term 'acid rain' is slightly misleading, and would be more accurate if deemed 'enhanced acid rain', as rain occurs acidic naturally. Acidity is measured on what is know as the pH scale. Fourteen is the most basic, seven is the most neutral, and zero is the most acidic. Pure rain has a pH level of 7, which is exactly neutral. The acidity of rain is determined by the pH of pure water in reaction with atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide, resulting in carbonic acid. These particles partly dissociate to produce hydrogen ions and bicarbonate ions ...
    Related: acid, acid rain, rain, electric utilities, major change
  • Acid Rain - 312 words
    Acid Rain Acid Rain Acid rain forms high in the clouds in a gaseous form. Theses gasses stay in the atmosphere until they come in contact with rain that dissolves the gasses. A mild solution of sulfuric and nitric acid is formed. These drops fall to the earth and get into our water table beneath the surface. From there they are collected into streams, rivers, and lakes that eventually will lead to the ocean. Rain isn't the only form acidity falls to the earth. About half of all the acidity falls back through dry deposition as gasses and dry particles. The wind blows the acid particles onto cars, homes, trees, and buildings. The acid discharge is then washed from the surfaces by rain. The run ...
    Related: acid, acid rain, rain, air pollution, water table
  • Acid Rain - 1,731 words
    Acid Rain Introduction: What Causes Acid Rain? One of the main causes of acid rain is sulfur dioxide. Natural sources, which emit this gas, are Volcanoes, sea spray, rotting vegetation and plankton. However, the burning of fossil fuels, such as Coal and oil, are largely to be blamed for approximately half of the emissions of this gas in the world. When sulfur dioxide reaches the atmosphere, it oxidizes to first form a sulfate ion. It then Becomes sulfuric acid as it joins with hydrogen atoms in the air and falls back down to earth. Oxidation occurs the most in clouds and especially in heavily polluted air where other compounds such as ammonia and ozone help to catalyze the reaction, changing ...
    Related: acid, acid rain, rain, case study, ohio river
  • Acid Rain Legislation - 824 words
    Acid Rain Legislation Acid Rain Legislation Acid rain is a destructive force as a result of nature and man colliding. It is formed through harmful industrial emissions combining with contents of the earth's atmosphere; a dangerous combination. This prompted governments throughout North America to take action. Many laws and regulations have been implemented, yet the question still remains, Should tougher legislation be implemented to force industries to reduce acid rain emissions? To decide whether tougher legislation should be implemented, one must first understand the details of what exactly acid rain is. Acid rain is a result of mankind's carelessness. It travels a long one of the most eff ...
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  • Acid Rains - 540 words
    Acid Rains Acid rain refers to all types of precipitation--rain, snow, sleet, hail, fog--that is acidic in nature. Acidic means that these forms of water have a pH lower than the 5.6 average of rainwater. Acid rain kills aquatic life, trees, crops and other vegetation, damages buildings and monuments, corrodes copper and lead piping, damages such man-made things as automobiles, reduces soil fertility and can cause toxic metals to leach into underground drinking water sources. Rain is naturally acidic because carbon dioxide, found normally in the earth's atmosphere, reacts with water to form carbonic acid. While "pure" rain's acidity is pH 5.6-5.7, actual pH readings vary from place to place ...
    Related: acid, acid rain, carbon dioxide, bodies of water, dioxide
  • Africa - 1,680 words
    Africa European Imperialism European Imperialism European expansion was almost a certainty. The continent was relatively poor place for agriculture, which pushed Europeans outside of Europe in search of new soil. Different countries sent explorers, like Columbus and Magellan, to find unknown trade routes to India and Asia. They stumbled onto new sources for raw materials and goods and Europe was suddenly substantially profiting. The exploration of Africa, Asia, and South America provided new wealth. It increased the standard of living for Europeans, introduced them to spices, luxurious goods, silver, and gold (class notes). Later revolutions and reformers throughout the 19th and 20th centuri ...
    Related: africa, africa asia, power over, european society, indochina
  • Albania - 1,470 words
    Albania Introduction Today, Albania is a real mess. What is currently occurring in the region complicates the situation even further. I'm not sure what Albania should do for the next ten days, let alone ten years. But, I will try to discuss economics and resources. Second, past and current military and diplomatic policy. Finally, I want to tie all of this to the idea of adopting the policies and philosophies of the Western democracies. Only through the aid, encouragement and protection of the West, can Albania hope to make progress for itself and it's citizens. Economics Albania is the poorest country in Europe. Years of dependence on the Soviet Union and China, followed by virtually complet ...
    Related: albania, greek orthodox, first year, strategic importance, geographic
  • Analysis On Bulgaria - 4,272 words
    Analysis On Bulgaria External historical events often changed Bulgaria's national boundaries in its first century of existence, natural terrain features defined most boundaries after 1944, and no significant group of people suffered serious economic hardship because of border delineation. Postwar Bulgaria contained a large percentage of the ethnic Bulgarian people, although numerous migrations into and out of Bulgaria occurred at various times. None of the country's borders was officially disputed in 1991, although nationalist Bulgarians continued to claim that Bulgaria's share of Macedonia--which it shared with both Yugoslavia and Greece--was less than just because of the ethnic connection ...
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  • Ancient Celtic Religion - 1,457 words
    Ancient Celtic Religion Ancient Celtic Religion When thinking of Celtic religion, the first thing that comes to ones mind is generally Druidism, and maybe even Stonehenge. There were many other components to religion in Celtic society before the Common Era, and they were integrated within the daily life, and still remain part of the culture. The sources available are mostly second hand or legends that have become christianised over time, but we can still learn a lot about their beliefs, and how they were intertwined with daily life. The people who lived 25,000 years ago were in awe of nature. They believed that each aspect of nature, such as rain, rivers; thunder and all other natural evens ...
    Related: celtic, religion, rise of christianity, daily life, christianity
  • Ancient Civilization - 1,498 words
    Ancient Civilization Describe Paleolithic and Neolithic cultures. What were the main characteristics of each? The Paleolithic Old Stone era began in about 40,000 - 10,000 B. C. The beginning of this period was marked by the first human hunter-gatherer societies. Hunting, fishing, and gathering of fruits and nuts were the main economic endeavors at the time. The responsibilities in these hunter-gathering societies were shared. The men of this period did the very dangerous hunting of large wild animals like bison and reindeer, while women gatherer fruits and nuts for an entire year. The small communities of 25-50 people came to consensus on decisions and ideas were shared. The extended family ...
    Related: civilization, epic of gilgamesh, men and women, religion & politics, irrigation
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