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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: rigid

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  • 1984 - 521 words
    1984 1984 - Summary Winston Smith is an insignificant member of the ruling Party in London, in the nation of Oceania. Everywhere Winston goes, even his own home, he is watched through telescreens, and everywhere he looks he sees the face of the Party's omniscient leader, the figure known only as Big Brother. The Party controls everything, even the people's history and language: The Party is currently forcing the implementation of an invented language called Newspeak, which prevents the possibility for political rebellion by eliminating all words related to it. Even thinking rebellious thoughts is illegal-- thoughtcrime is the worst crime of all. As the novel opens, Winston feels frustrated b ...
    Related: 1984, winston smith, most dangerous, big brother, illegally
  • 1984 And Today - 660 words
    1984 and Today In George Orwells 1984, Winston Smith feels frustrated by the oppression and rigid control of the ruling Party of London, which prohibits free thought, sex, and any expression of individuality. The people of his nation, Oceania, are watched every minute of every day by Big Brother, an omniscient leader who can only be seen on telescreens, but never in real life. Winston illegally purchases a diary in which to write his criminal thoughts, and becomes fixated on a powerful Party member named OBrien, whom Winston believes is a secret member of the Brotherhood, the legendary group that works to overthrow the party. He also begins a covert affair with Julia, a co-worker, which is o ...
    Related: 1984, real life, big brother, george orwell, emmanuel
  • 1984 By George Orwell - 549 words
    1984 By George Orwell 1984 by George Orwel is a dramatic novel portraying a restricted society. Winston Smith is a thin, 39 year-old man who wears blue Party coveralls. Winston is sick of the Party's rigid control over his life and world, and begins trying to rebel against the Party--writing defiant thoughts in a secret diary and starting an illegal affair with Julia. Julia a beautiful dark-haired girl working in the Fiction Department at the Ministry of Truth. A mysterious and powerful member of the Inner Party whom Winston believes is a member of the Brotherhood. Throughout the novel, Winston is obsessed with O'Brien, dreaming he will meet him one day in "the place where there is no darkne ...
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  • 22399 - 1,303 words
    2/23/99 The Hindenburg Disaster Count Ferdinand Von Zeppelin and his crew operated their first airship nearly one hundred years ago. Airships are big controllable balloons, also known as dirigibles. There are three classes of airships, rigid, nonrigid and semirigid. Rigid airships (zeppelins) use framework in the interior to keep their shape. Semirigid airships are a combination of framework and gas pressure to maintain their shape. Nonrigid airships (blimps) rely solely on air pressure to keep their form. They are all propelled with engines, use rudders and elevator flaps for steering and have a gondola where passengers travel. The pride of the zeppelin works was a rigid airship which was o ...
    Related: major general, sporting events, imbalance, nose
  • 3 Non Traditional Religions Voodoo, Spiritualism, Cults - 1,932 words
    ... Evil Deeds done on Earth, VII. Eternal Progress Open to every Human Soul. (Spiritualism) Spiritualists are often accused of being atheists or Anti-Christian, yet our first Principle recognizes God as our Father; but who is God?. Spiritualism is universal religion recognizing such leaders as Buddha, Mohammed, Moses as well as Jesus. It does not however, claim a monopoly of Religion. Ones religion is a personal matter and any person adopting Spiritualism is free to interpret the principles according to their own awareness. Furthermore, they do not believe in a Vindictive God. They are their own judges and they shall receive compensation or retribution for what ever they have done whether ...
    Related: human soul, psychological effects, encarta online, accused, steven
  • A Comparison Of Coleridge's Rationalism To Wordsworth's Liberalism - 1,720 words
    A Comparison Of Coleridge'S Rationalism To Wordsworth'S Liberalism All friendships grow and nurture each other through time. The friendship between Coleridge and Wordsworth allowed for a special relationship of both criticism and admiration to develop. As their friendship matured, they would play important roles in each other's works, culminating in their joint publication of Lyrical Ballads, which is said to mark the beginning of the Romantic period and be a combination of their best works. Despite their basic differences in poetic styles and philosophical beliefs, they would help each other create numerous works renown for their depth and creativity. Coleridge was a reserved dreamer, a tru ...
    Related: comparison, liberalism, rationalism, young boy, samuel taylor coleridge
  • A House For Mr Biswas - 536 words
    A House For Mr. Biswas Ever since his birth, Mr. Biswas - the main protagonist of V.S. Naipaul's A House for Mr. Biswas - never has an opportunity to develop a sense of self. He is always finding himself in situations that make him feel powerless. Due to this powerlessness he is always in situations where he is having people tell him what to do. He never has any personal power. Mr. Biswas realizes that with money and possessions a person tends to have more power in society. Indeed, for Mr. Biswas owning a house serves as a symbol which illustrates his ability to realize a self-identity and gain personal power to take control of his life. Mr. Biswas is caught in the grasp of feudalism. He is ...
    Related: biswas, dream house, social structure, self identity, listening
  • A House For Mr Biswas - 553 words
    A House For Mr. Biswas Ever since his birth, Mr. Biswas - the main protagonist of V.S. Naipaul's A House for Mr. Biswas - never has an opportunity to develop a sense of self. He is always finding himself in situations that make him feel powerless. Due to this powerlessness he is always in situations where he is having people tell him what to do. He never has any personal power. Mr. Biswas realizes that with money and possessions a person tends to have more power in society. Indeed, for Mr. Biswas owning a house serves as a symbol which illustrates his ability to realize a self-identity and gain personal power to take control of his life. Mr. Biswas is caught in the grasp of feudalism. He is ...
    Related: biswas, dream house, self identity, social structure, dollhouse
  • A House For Mr Biswas - 553 words
    A House For Mr. Biswas Ever since his birth, Mr. Biswas - the main protagonist of V.S. Naipaul's A House for Mr. Biswas - never has an opportunity to develop a sense of self. He is always finding himself in situations that make him feel powerless. Due to this powerlessness he is always in situations where he is having people tell him what to do. He never has any personal power. Mr. Biswas realizes that with money and possessions a person tends to have more power in society. Indeed, for Mr. Biswas owning a house serves as a symbol which illustrates his ability to realize a self-identity and gain personal power to take control of his life. Mr. Biswas is caught in the grasp of feudalism. He is ...
    Related: biswas, dream house, v. s. naipaul, self identity, symbolic
  • Adolescent Behavior In School - 1,601 words
    Adolescent Behavior In School Middle School is a large school and has students attending from six Putnam County towns and two Dutchess County towns. On the average, the graduating class has close to 500 students and the typical class has 32 students attending. The school has two cafeterias in order to accommodate it's large student population, one cafeteria to provide for fifth and sixth graders, and another for seventh and eighth graders. Interesting enough, the different classes do not attend lunch together, in other words, seventh and eighth graders do not attend lunch together nor fifth and sixth graders. Again I assume this is strictly do to the large population of this school. I entere ...
    Related: adolescent, adolescent behavior, middle school, school work, more important
  • Aerodynamics Of Planes - 1,142 words
    Aerodynamics Of Planes Ever since I was little I was amazed at the ability for a machine to fly. I have always wanted to explore ideas of flight and be able to actually fly. I think I may have found my childhood fantasy in the world of aeronautical engineering. The object of my paper is to give me more insight on my future career as an aeronautical engineer. This paper was also to give me ideas of the physics of flight and be to apply those physics of flight to compete in a high school competition. History of Flight The history of flying dates back as early as the fifteenth century. A Renaissance man named Leonardo da Vinci introduced a flying machine known as the ornithopter. Da Vinci propo ...
    Related: aerodynamics, u.s. military, flying machines, space shuttle, wing
  • African Americans Are Still Enslaved In America - 465 words
    African Americans Are Still Enslaved In America African Americans are Still Enslaved in America Blacks have no rights that which Whites are bound to respect These were the words the words of Chief Justice Roger Tanry. These words that have been believed and honored for centuries. Blacks have attempted to change these discriminative views of White Americans for many years. As an African American born in the United States I have witnessed and experienced several instances of racism and discrimination. White Americans have always wanted to control and manipulate the minds Black America. I know first hand that African Americans are still enslaved in America today.Slavery marked the beginning the ...
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  • Africanamerican Representation In The Media - 1,845 words
    African-American Representation In The Media In Jacqueline Bobo's article, The Color Purple : Black Women as Cultural Readers, she discusses the way in which black women create meaning out of the mainstream text of the film The Color Purple. In Leslie B. Innis and Joe R. Feagin's article, The Cosby Show : The View From the Black Middle Class, they are examining black middle-class responses to the portrayal of black family life on The Cosby Show. In their respective articles, Bobo, and Innis and Feagin are investigating the representation of race, particularly African American race, in the mass media. The chief concerns of their investigations lie in how African Americans deal with the way th ...
    Related: mainstream media, mass media, media, representation, working women
  • After The Reconstruction Years, Blacks And Whites Often Rode Together In The Same Railway Cars, Ate In The Same Restaurants, - 1,531 words
    After the Reconstruction years, blacks and whites often rode together in the same railway cars, ate in the same restaurants, used the same public facilities, but did not often interact as equals. The emergence of large black communities in urban areas and of significant black labor force in factories presented a new challenge to white Southerners. They could not control these new communities in the same informal ways they had been able to control rural blacks, which were more directly dependent on white landowners and merchants than their urban counterparts. In the city, blacks and whites were in more direct competition than they had been in the countryside. There was more danger of social m ...
    Related: blacks, railway, reconstruction, reconstruction period, white supremacy
  • Age Of Innocence - 1,264 words
    Age Of Innocence Although Martin Scorcese does not sound like the logical choice to direct an adaptation of Edith Wharton's novel about manners and morals in New York's society in the 1980's the psychological violence inflicted between characters is at least as damaging as the physical violence perpetrated by Scorcese's usual gangsters. Martin Scorcese has made a reputation of conveying the essence of the human spirit through visuals and vivid colors. His work in "The Age of Innocence" is no different. Scorcese closely observed the tiny details of the world and the impossible situation within the novel. The film stays remarkable true to the Wharton novel, fleshing out details and bringing th ...
    Related: age of innocence, innocence, the age of innocence, victorian period, social revolution
  • Albert Einstien - 1,742 words
    Albert Einstien Men and Women of Science Albert Einstein Early Life Einstein was born in Ulm, Germany on Mar. 14, 1879. Einstein's parents, who were non observant Jews, moved from Ulm to Munich, Germany when Einstein was an infant. The family business was the manufacture of electrical parts. When the business failed, in 1894, the family moved to Milan, Italy. At this time Einstein decided officially to end his German citizenship. Within a year, still without having completed secondary school, Einstein failed an examination that would have allowed him to pursue a course of study leading to a diploma as an electrical engineer at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology. He spent the next year ...
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  • American Beauty - 1,044 words
    ... oblems, so he denied his own sons existence. When Ricky returns from his hiatus from society, he realizes that to live freely he must create a faade too and use it against his father. Ricky creates a fake reality for his father. The jobs that Ricky supposedly holds he uses to pull in front of his fathers eyes. Ricky Fitts uses his fathers weakness against his own father. With his father tricked into believing that he is disciplined and structured, Ricky can do what ever he wants. Ricky defies the rigid dictating of his father by subversively using an illusion for his own ends. Ricky uses these ends to live his life however he pleases. Ricky accepts everything for what it is; he does not ...
    Related: american, american beauty, romeo and juliet, life changes, instantly
  • American Verna - 1,001 words
    American Verna "The American Verna" Why is that humans were able to practically "take over" their environment and leave all other animal species far behind in the race of survival? Not many would argue that we were able to do so just because we can walk upright and we have unspecialized teeth. In fact, humans are capable of many things that separate us from the animals. Our far most important trait is the ability to analyze and comprehend complex subject matters. From that we can learn, understand and communicate with one another so we could accomplish things as a group, a group which one day became so complex that without structure and laws, chaos would preside. In our times, we see many di ...
    Related: american, american freedom, american system, social mobility, social structures
  • American Verna - 1,012 words
    ... did not change much through the years. A cause could be in the human's nature of the need for belonging to a whole. There are two main approaches that could break the firmness of a social structure. One comes from outside the system by enculturation, and attacks the un-fairness of the structure with compare to other ones. A second approach could be made by the lower classes demanding for better conditions. In India, there seems to be a form of harmony and peace within the lower classes. The "Herd Theory" explains this phenomenon by going back to the nature of human behavior. As other animals, people seem to think that a great form of self-defense is associating with ones who seem share c ...
    Related: american, american system, chicago press, significant difference, contrast
  • Ancient Civilization - 1,498 words
    Ancient Civilization Describe Paleolithic and Neolithic cultures. What were the main characteristics of each? The Paleolithic Old Stone era began in about 40,000 - 10,000 B. C. The beginning of this period was marked by the first human hunter-gatherer societies. Hunting, fishing, and gathering of fruits and nuts were the main economic endeavors at the time. The responsibilities in these hunter-gathering societies were shared. The men of this period did the very dangerous hunting of large wild animals like bison and reindeer, while women gatherer fruits and nuts for an entire year. The small communities of 25-50 people came to consensus on decisions and ideas were shared. The extended family ...
    Related: civilization, epic of gilgamesh, men and women, religion & politics, irrigation
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