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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: rhyme scheme

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  • A Dream Deferred - 898 words
    A Dream Deferred A Dream Deferred What happens to a dream deferred? (a) Does it dry up (b) like a raisin in the sun? (c) Or fester like a sore- (d) And then run? (c) Does it stink like rotten meat? (e) Or crust and sugar over- like a syrupy sweet? (e) Maybe it just sags (f) like a heavy load. (g) Or does it explode? (g) Born in Joplin, Missouri, James Langston Hughes (1902-1967) was born into an abolitionist family. As the grandson of James Mercer Langston, the first Black American to be elected to public office in 1855, Hughes attended Central High School in Cleveland, Ohio, but began writing poetry in the eighth grade, and was selected as Class Poet. His father didn't think he would be abl ...
    Related: deferred, dream, dream deferred, raisin in the sun, james langston hughes
  • Alighieri, Dante The Divine Comedy - 1,760 words
    Alighieri, Dante The Divine Comedy The Divine Comedy by Dante Alighieri (1265 - 1321) Type of Work: Allegorical religious poem Setting Hell, Purgatory and Paradise; A.D. 1300 Principal Characters Dante, the Pilgrim Virgil, the Poet, and Dante's guide Beatrice, Dante's womanly ideal and religious inspiration Story Overview Prologue: Dante, realizing he has strayed from the "true way,. into worldliness, tells of a vision where he travels through all the levels of Hell, up the mount of Purgatory, and finally through the realms of Paradise, where he is allowed a brief glimpse of God. The traveler sets out on the night before Good Friday, and finds himself in the middle of a dark wood. There he e ...
    Related: comedy, dante, dante alighieri, divine, divine comedy
  • An Analysis Of The Poem If You Should Go By Countee Cullen - 534 words
    An Analysis Of The Poem If You Should Go By Countee Cullen In the poem If You Should Go, Countee Cullen emphasizes on the understanding of human joys and sorrows. The importance of joy is shown using different examples of joy such as love and dream. Both stanzas include a persons feeling or reactions towards joy during the happy moments as well as the feelings after the joyous moment is over. In this poem, Cullen conveys several different messages. One of the themes of the poem is that one never realizes what one have until it is lost. In this case it refers to joyous moments. The second stanza the poet also tells the reader that joy makes a long lasting memory in ones mind which is seen in ...
    Related: countee, countee cullen, cullen, poem, point of view
  • Analysis Of Robert Frosts Stopping By Woods On A Snowy Evening - 720 words
    Analysis Of Robert Frost's Stopping By Woods On A Snowy Evening Robert Frost's Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening is by far one of my favorite works of modern poetry. The pensive, unhurried mood of the poem is reflected with a calm rich imagery that creates a vivid mental picture. The simple words and rhyme scheme of the poem give it an easy flow, which adds to the tranquility of the piece. Every aspect of the poem builds off the others to put the mind into the calm of a winter evening. The first stanza of the poem is rather simple and provides the basis for the imagery. It mentions the woods and implies that they are located away from town and civilization his house is in the village thou ...
    Related: evening, robert frost, snowy, snowy evening, stopping by woods on a snowy evening
  • Baca Vs Bradstreet - 850 words
    Baca Vs. Bradstreet Comparative Essay: Baca vs. Bradstreet In Jimmy Santiago Baca's poem entitled I, and Anne Bradstreet's Verses Upon the Burning of Her House, both write about their dreadful experience of the burning of their homes. But the way in which each of the poets express this occurrence, with the use of different styles of imagery and the diction, can change the way the reader interprets the poem. The tone used by each poet is critical because it indicates to the reader their emotions. Therefore, by comparing these poems of Baca and Bradstreet, it will be evident that these elements of writing: tone, diction, and imagery; are crucial factors that will affect the way a reader percei ...
    Related: anne bradstreet, baca, bradstreet, rhyme scheme, belong
  • Because I Could Not Stop For Death, By Emily Dickinson - 1,214 words
    Because I Could Not Stop For Death, By Emily Dickinson 'Because I could not stop for Death - ,' A Poem of Both Marriage and Death When thinking of both marriage and death, the word "eternity" comes to mind. Marriage is looked at as a symbol of eternal love, and death is looked at as a state of eternal rest. Also, Christians consider life after death as an eternal state. In "Because I could not stop for Death - ," Emily Dickinson portrays death by describing an eternal marriage. On the literal level, the speaker remembers a time where she was carried off and eloped with a man called Death and his partner in crime, Immortality. Not realizing that going with Death meant that she would have to l ...
    Related: because i could not stop for death, dickinson, emily, emily dickinson, turning point
  • Bradstreet Heritage - 1,032 words
    Bradstreet Heritage Anne Bradstreet (1612-1672), although born in England, is considered to be the first American poet. She is also revered as the first woman to be published. Married to Simon Bradstreet at age sixteen, she ventured with her family to the Massachusetts colony. Simon, the governor of Massachusetts colony, served a major role in her life and her literary career. He was the subject in many of the poems included in the two volumes Bradstreet had published. A Puritan all her life, Bradstreet led a simple life guided by principles of grace, plainness, and divine missions. In "To My Dear and Living Husband", she shows her devotion to her husband in a smooth and simple manner. We ca ...
    Related: anne bradstreet, bradstreet, heritage, loving husband, old english
  • Browning Monologues - 1,111 words
    Browning Monologues Consider the range of characterisation in Browning's dramatic monologues and the poetic methods he employs to portray his speakers. Some are written in rhyming verse, use metaphors, et cetera, but for what reason? What is the writer trying to achieve and how successful is he? Robert Browning (1812-1889) was an English poet noted for his mastery of dramatic monologue. He was born in London, the son of a wealthy clerk at the bank of England, he received scant formal education but had access to his father's large library of about 6,000 volumes. Though initially unsuccessful as a poet and financially dependent on his family until well into adulthood Browning was to become a c ...
    Related: browning, dramatic monologue, robert browning, last duchess, men and women
  • Browning Monologues - 1,124 words
    ... achievement of Browning's because unlike the other two speakers he has done nothing wrong. He is even referred to as 'The faultless painter' in the subtitle, though we realise that there are no errors in his hand with its matchless skill, there is in the soul that directs that hand. The reason we detest Andrea by the end of the poem is because although he recognises his faults of character he doesn't address them or take blame and adopts a very fatalistic attitude to his life, 'All is as God over-rules' Similarly as in the other poems the rhythm also says a lot of the character. Andrea's sentences are often short and break off and the verse is blank which make the speaker seem dull and ...
    Related: browning, dramatic monologue, the duke, rhyme scheme, master
  • Critical Appreciation Of William Blakes London - 1,180 words
    Critical Appreciation Of William Blakes London 22nd September 2000 A Critical appreciation of William Blake's London. William Blake who lived in the latter half of the eighteenth century and the early part of the nineteenth century was a poet, a philosopher, a radical, an artist, and a great thinker; who was able to bring about remarkable results with the simplest of means in all of his work. He wrote his poems with deep personal emotions but if we look further and ignore the prophetic qualities we discover a further intended meanings of a strong political and social level. He was a critic of his own era but his poetry also strikes a chord in ours. He was one of several poets of the time who ...
    Related: appreciation, critical, london, william blake, industrial revolution
  • Daddy, Vampires, Black Hearts - 685 words
    Daddy, Vampires, Black Hearts In the poem Daddy, Sylvia Plath says that there are women who, due to early conditioning, find themselves without the tools to deal with oppressive and controlling men. They are left feeling helpless and hopeless. For some women, the struggle is never resolved, others take most of a lifetime. For a lucky few, they are granted a reprieve. The speaker in this poem is Sylvia Plath. The poem describes her feelings of oppression and her battle to come to grips with the issues of this power imbalance. The poem also conjures the struggle many women face in a male dominated society. The conflict of this poem is male authority and control versus the right of a female to ...
    Related: sylvia plath, mike tyson, rhyme scheme, tone, domination
  • Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night - 811 words
    Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night This is a poem about the joy and sadness that comes with the flash of burning life soon blown out with nothing more then a sigh. It focuses on the sadness as those we care for go far too gently into that good night. Of those who left before their time. As this poem was written specifically for Thomass dying father it is even more poignant in the emotional weight the words convey. This poem radiates with intensity, in particular, the verse beginning: wild men who caught and sang the sun in flight is simply beautiful poetry. Addressed to the poet's father as he approaches blindness and death. The relevant aspect of the relationship was Thomas's profound re ...
    Related: gentle, good night, good thing, more important, rhyme scheme
  • Dover Beach - 653 words
    Dover Beach How can life or anything be so wonderful, but at times seem so unbearable? This is a question that Matthew Arnold may have asked himself one day, while writing "Dover Beach". This is a poem about a sea and a beach that is truly beautiful, but hold much deeper meaning than what meets the eye. The poem is written in free verse with no particular meter or rhyme scheme, although some of the words do rhyme. Arnold is the speaker speaking to someone he loves. As the poem progresses, the reader sees why Arnold poses the question stated above, and why life seems to be the way it is. During the first part of the poem Arnold states, "The Sea is calm tonight" and in line 7, "Only, from the ...
    Related: beach, dover, dover beach, free verse, matthew arnold
  • Eldorado - 703 words
    Eldorado In the poem Eldorado, the poet conveys the romantic attitude of following ones passions to the very end, even throughout all circumstances. From a realists point of view, when times become challenging or success is unlikely, it is wiser to give up and stop wasting time. A romantic, however, views the pursuit of passions and human nature as the only goal; every worry or concern that lies in the way of emotional thought is only arbitrary. This poem is written in an AABCCB rhyme scheme and consists of four main stanzas, each with the repeating symbol of shadows and the legendary city of gold, Eldorado. The knight in the poem begins his journey with much enthusiasm, becomes discouraged ...
    Related: human nature, the knight, point of view, mountains, challenging
  • Emily Dickinson And Walt Whitman - 448 words
    Emily Dickinson And Walt Whitman Emily Dickinson and Walt Whitman are two of literatures greatest innovators, they each changed the face of American literature. they are also considered one of literatures greatest pair of opposites. Dickinson is a timid wreck loose. While Whitman was very open and sociable, Whitman shares the ideas of William Cullen Bryant, everyone and everything is somehow linked by a higher bond. Both Whitman and Dickinson were decades ahead of their time, sharing only the universality of their works. Whitmans works always express his feelings of equality towards all mankind "For every atom belonging to me as good to you"(Whitman 347). Whitman exemplifies the American val ...
    Related: dickinson, emily, emily dickinson, walt, walt whitman, whitman
  • Emily Dickinson: A Pastiche And Explication - 1,284 words
    Emily Dickinson: A Pastiche And Explication The Original I heard a Fly buzz - when I died - I heard a Fly buzz - when I died - The Stillness in the Room Was like the Stillness in the Air - Between the Heaves of Storm - The Eyes around - had wrung them dry - 5 And Breaths were gathering firm For that last Onset - when the King Be witnessed - in the Room - I willed my Keepsakes - Signed away What portion of me be 10 Assignable - and then it was There interposed a Fly - With Blue - uncertain stumbling Buzz - Between the light - and me - And then the windows failed - and then 15 I could not see to see - A Pastiche In Troubled - Stillness did I lay, In Troubled - Stillness did I lay, Till Heaven' ...
    Related: emily, emily dickinson, explication, pastiche, make sense
  • Episode Of Hands - 620 words
    Episode Of Hands The first thing that comes to mind upon reading this poem is a sense of calmness and relaxation. Described well is an attempt at reminiscing at one's past, and how it may have affected life at present. It is a poem of truth, and the joy that comes with the realization of one's self, the inner being. In the poem is a character who has injured himself during work, and has taken a recess to tend to the wound. During this time the character is able to find it within himself to discover a truth within that reveals more to him of his life than his life itself could do, having seen its entirety. It gives evidence of having lived two separate lives, one on top of the other, but neit ...
    Related: episode, rhyme scheme, free verse, poem, iron
  • Essay On Much Madness Is Divinest Sense - 983 words
    Essay On Much Madness Is Divinest Sense Ashley Whitfield Professor Bruster English 102, Section 53 17 April 2000 The Divinity of Nonconformists Crazy, lunatic, mad.... these are words that have become part of society's everyday vocabulary. Though they are psychological in nature, they are often applied to people and objects that may not fit into the every day norm. In Emily Dickinson's "Much Madness is divinest Sense," Dickinson criticizes society's inability to accept non-conformist and expresses the belief that it is the majority who should be labeled as, "mad." In the lyrical poem "Much Madness is divinest Sense," Dickinson concentrates on society's judgmental views of non-conformists. Di ...
    Related: madness, subject matter, free verse, rhyme scheme, rhyme
  • Imagery - 2,396 words
    IMAGERY The term imagery has various applications. Generally, imagery includes all kinds of sense perception (not just visual pictures). In a more limited application, the term describes visible objects only. But the term is perhaps most commonly used to describe figurative language, which is as a theme in literature. An example is animal imagery in Othello When Iago tortures Othello with animal images of his wife's supposed infidelity, "were they as prime as goats, as hot as monkeys" (3.3.403), his description so overcomes the Moor that later, in greeting Lodovico, he suddenly blurts out, "Goats and monkeys!" (4.1.256). SIMILE A direct, expressed comparison between two things essentially un ...
    Related: imagery, love song of j alfred prufrock, king herod, dylan thomas, literature
  • Imagery - 2,411 words
    ... ading of a poem, examining the work for meter. Meter is a regular pattern of unstressed and stressed syllables in a line or lines of poetry. BLANK VERSE A Blank Verse is a poem written in unrhymed iambic pentameter. Consider the following from The Ball Poem by John Berryman: What is the boy now, who has lost his ball, What, what is he to do? I saw it go Merrily bouncing, down the street, and then Merrily over-there it is in the water! COUPLET A Couplet is a stanza of two lines, usually rhyming. The following by Andrew Marvell is an example of a rhymed couplet: Had we but world enough and time, This coyness, lady, were no crime. QUATRAIN Quatrain is a four-line stanza which may be rhymed ...
    Related: imagery, step approach, rhyme scheme, john donne, venetian
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